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Author Topic: " T " Gauge  (Read 3281 times)
jerryl

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« on: August 15, 2009, 10:27:45 PM »

  I was at the Greenburg show today & saw a VERY small gauge train & circle of track.  The track is 3mm which is a little under 1/8''.   The cars which resembled subway cars, were about 1/4'' high.  The engine had a headlight that came on when it ran forward,& red lights came on the back when it was in reverse.  The package consisted of a 4 unit train, an oval of track, a rerailer, a controller that ran off of 2 flashlight batteries.  AC adapter also available.  More track is available along with "people".
   The whole package was $130. Couldn't believe the paint job. If anyone is going tomorrow, it is located against the wall near the layouts.   
    A "z" gauge hopper car looked like a GIANT next to them.  They ran very well, considering the size.   For phone # or email...email me.   Jerry
 
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Hamish K

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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2009, 04:57:33 AM »

I saw one of these recently at a model train show here in Australia. They are very very small! They are made by a Japanese company and buildings etc (Japanese prototypes) are also available. No switches , as yet anyway, so operation is limited. Only commuter EMUs are currently available. Main use would seem to be in building a model city or etc. and providing it with operating trains for movement, rather than as a model railroad with a full range of operations. I should imagine shunting movements and etc. could be difficult.

Another use is as a basis for a miniature, fairground or park railway in a larger scale. The company making them is apparently bringing out a 1/32 scale children's ride on park railroad set. This will represent a gauge of about 3 and a half inches, at the very small end of ride on park railroad gauges. In HO 3mm is about 10 and a half inches, a good gauge I would have thought for a fairground set up.  So perhaps an enterprising scratch builder could use it as the basis for an HO scenic accessory.

An interesting novelty and each to his or her own, but I can't see Bachmann rushing to make these just yet!

Hamish




 
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Hamish K

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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2009, 11:02:17 AM »

I have now found out that turnouts (switches or points depending where you are) are to become available fot T gauge. Doesn't alter my view that T is really too small except to add movement to a model city or other scene - it is hard to tell what the trains are because of their size. Others may disagree.

Hamish
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Cooped


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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2009, 03:00:36 PM »

I saw this too there. Honestly if you tripped in front of it you run the risk of it dissappearing up your nose it's so tiny. I was amazed.
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Yes dear, I'm looking at trains again........
jerryl

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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2009, 03:44:33 PM »

   They are small & IMHO still a novelty. Forgot to mention that also included in the package is a "back & forth" circuit that allows for a point to point layout.
    I also found some video on youtube, one makes them look good while the other....not so much.   The one I saw at the show ran very well, in fact the operator walked away for a while & it still ran fine, which is when most derailments seem to happen, at least in my world.  Jerry 
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RAM

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« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2009, 04:18:33 PM »

I can remember when Z scale came out.  Well even N scale.  They were more a a toy.  They did not run well and were used mainly a train set.  They both run great today.  I am not quite old enough to remember when HO came out.  I think I was born about the time it came out.  1932.
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Hamish K

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« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2009, 07:12:30 PM »

"T" is not the smallest model train available, but it may be the smallest with motors in the trains themselves. A company makes 1/900 scale trains that are powered by a belt under the track, so the train can only run round in circles or ovals. Tiny scenic layouts with operating trains are available.

Some years ago (early 1990s?) in Europe HZ scale was prodiced,  1/440 on I think 3.25 mm gauge track. I don't know much about them or how they were powered and  I don't think they lasted long.

I/900 could provide a fairground set up for Z scale (track would be about 13 or 14 inch gauge) and a small ride on railroad in N (roughly 7 inch gauge track).

Hamish
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buzz

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« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2009, 04:45:38 AM »

I think you will find the manufacturer is serious about it.
There are trains set track flex track soon to be points.
Buildings, figures and other accessories available.
The Autum trees and palms look like the may be usefull for super detailing,
residential properties in the foreground of HO and OO layouts.
Add a suitable bead or free travel tooth paste cap and some tea leaves, and you have potted plants for the foreground houses, or they could be
planted in the flower beds.
Oh they also do a 1/32 scale miniature train that runs on the same 3mm gauge track.
regards John
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A model railway can be completed but its never finished
jerryl

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« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2009, 08:38:17 AM »

I noticed on youtube that there is a "ZZ" scale. It didn't seem to give the proportions, but stated that it was the smallest.
  I was told that the "T" gauge uses pager motors. Can't believe those gears could hold up for that long.
  This has to be a young person's gauge. I'm having trouble rerailing my HO rolling stock!    Jerry
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RAM

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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2009, 10:17:22 AM »

Until the 2006 announcement of T scale, ZZ scale WAS the smallest commercially available scale for model railroads.

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