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Author Topic: Varney Dockside Switcher  (Read 72118 times)
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2009, 11:39:35 PM »

a gloss or semi gloss finish of the paint would be fine, then when you're done applying decals. a coat of dull coat will hide all the edges of the decals. and give a very clean surface. At this point it will need the cotton glove treatment.
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jonathan


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« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2009, 06:34:30 AM »

What follows is a small picture story:


Motor broke!


Kite String!


Alcohol Bath!  Yes, it ran like a motor boat, baby.


She Lives!  Actually ran smoother the more she ran.




Kite string will only last so long. Now I must go down the new motor path.  Nuts!

Regards,

Jonathan
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2009, 06:54:20 AM »

Ask the people at Yardbird if they have an exact motor replacement or parts for that motor. If not, then you could go for the new motor
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jonathan


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« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2009, 07:52:06 AM »

PD,

I will definitely be looking at a new motor from yardbird.  They have one made specifically for the Varney Dockside ($30.95).

Tim mentioned that I will kill the motor, if I disassemble it (magnetism will dissappear).

Was probably reaching too back in time anyway.  I got a 1966 engine to run very well, with all its original parts. 62 years was probably a bit of a stretch for this old motor.  But for now, it will run until I get a replacement.  Spilled milk if you will.

Will have to recover from Xmas shopping, before I go ordering any new parts right now.  However, I can get on with the painting part, if the thinner solution will ever release the 62-year-old paint!

Regards,

Jonathan
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jerryl

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« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2009, 11:51:26 AM »

The Bowser website says the valve gear kit will fit Varney Cary & Bowser Docksiders. Not sure they are available. If not, someone out there has some. I bought a valve gear kit for a mantua 0-6-0 awhile ago & never knew they existed.
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jonathan


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« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2009, 12:02:20 PM »

Jerry,

I have sent a couple of emails to Bowser, inquiring about replacement parts and detailing kits (valve gear). No response is forthcoming.  I could never make a valve gear, but I believe I can fashion my own stanchions and grabirons.  I have to proceed as if Bowser no longer stocks steamer parts.  Perhaps I'll find some parts at the upcoming trains show in January (DC area). I know I can count on kadee to stock some kind of coupler arrangement, when I get to that stage.

R,

J

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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2009, 01:28:35 PM »

try yardbird for the parts and valve gear. Much cheaper
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ebtnut

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« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2009, 03:10:56 PM »

I know this going sound a bit bizzare, but here's a suggestion as an interim solution.  See if you can get one of those small elastic "scrunchies" that women use in their hair.  That should give you a bit of flex, but be better than the kite string.  In the long run, yes, try and replace the motor in kind if possible. 
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jonathan


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« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2009, 08:01:07 AM »

ebtnut,

I've tried more bizarre things in the past, so the scrunchy idea sounds good to me.  Unfortunately, I couldn't find one small enough to work (my wife and daughter have a small collection of those things). However, I did tie a rubberband around said motor armature and that worked.  I ran the undercarriage of the switcher, this morning, for about 20 minutes in each direction.  It needs about 55% power to continue to run smoothly (a touch of wobble).  Dropping power down to 50% makes the engine start to jerk a little bit.  This is good enough for now, until I can get a new motor from Yardbird.

Now I'm concentrating on stripping the old paint.  After 60 hours of soaking in paint thinner, I can scratch off the paint with my fingernail, but not a toothbrush.  Will continue to soak the shell and cylinder for a few more days to see if the paint loosens up any further.

Also, I've found I can drill holes in the metal with a pin vise, and using some oil as a lubricant.  It is a very slow process, but who's in a hurry.

I have about 20 leftover stanchions from all the old GP35 kits I built this past year.  I believe I can cut them to length and mount into the small holes I drill. 

What's a good bonding agent (glue) for metal?

I may not be prototypical, but with the right glue, I can make it tough.  That's a loftier goal, so my son, or future grandson can play with the Varney and not do any serious damage.

First, I'm going to try the handrail on the pilot cross bar (nomenclature?).  Will post pics asap, to get an opinion of appearance and sturdiness.

Regards,

Jonathan
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Tim

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« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2009, 08:52:46 AM »

Jonathan

I find that 5min epoxy works very well on metal to metal joints.
Make sure that any lubricants from drilling are removed first.

Just make sure the parts are where you want them before the
glue sets.  They aren't moving after that.

Tim Anders
Souderton,PA
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ebtnut

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« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2009, 02:59:56 PM »

Jonathon:  I thought about a rubber band, but thought the scruncie might be more durable.  Rubber doesn't usually take well to lubricants.  I would seriously suggest trying to get the proper hand rail stanchions since they will look much better than those from the Geep.  As noted, check with Yardbird.  For glue, I prefer gap-filling ACC for jobs like that, but epoxy will work just fine.  For the paint removal, if you haven't had much success I would suggest getting some paint stripper from your local home supply store.  Another suggestion that has worked for some folks is automotive brake fluid.  With any of these, make sure to wear hand protection. 
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ebtnut

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« Reply #26 on: December 11, 2009, 03:01:37 PM »

Oh, and one other thing.  Use beeswax as a lubricant for your pin vise drilling.  It doesn't create the cleaning problems some oils do when your trying to glue or paint.  You can get beeswax at a craft store or a sewing supply store.
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jonathan


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« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2009, 03:18:18 PM »

Great tip on the beeswax!  I just happen to have some sitting in an old treadle sewing machine I got stuck with (heirloom).  Wondered what that stuff was for...  trains of course.

I see that yardbird does have stanchions that are reasonable.  Will give it serious thought (one more thing to order along with the motor).   I've about decided that I will consider adding the valve gear AFTER the rest of the project is finished.  Again, this is something that I hope one of my progeny will want to play with... extra moving parts mean more possibilities for damage.

Thanks, once more, for the wisdom.

Jonathan
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2009, 05:11:43 PM »

 I just checked their site and yardbird has all parts for the varney little Joe. They may not be shown but you can ask for them. A lot of parts for these engines can also be acquired from bowser too, but they charge more.
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #29 on: December 11, 2009, 10:59:50 PM »

For brush springs, you might use music wire to go under that screw, then use the two ends to hold the two brushes.  Put some small shrink tubing on it to insulate the brushes from the spring.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
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