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Author Topic: Varney Dockside Switcher  (Read 71284 times)
J3a-614

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« Reply #210 on: June 29, 2010, 07:04:59 AM »

One of the neat things about railroading, prototype and model, is that you almost always are learning something new--in this case, some comments about the Docksides that appeared in Railway Preservation News with other comments on Western Maryland 202, a 4-6-2 converted to oil firing:

And finally, some pics of the rarely photographed engine taken June 24th, 2010:

Good timing on the way back from the Potomac - a nice cloudy yet blue sky day and a small heaping of Photoshop to bring out some of the details of this remarkable engine sitting under it's protective canopy.

What a beauty!

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=329421

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=329405

/Mitch
  
Why did the Western Maryland have an oil burner?

That was due to an anti-smoke ordinance in Baltimore; this conversion was for 4 of the WM's 4-6-2s. Several Pennsylvania engines also had similar conversions, including at least one 0-6-0 and a 4-4-2, E-6s No. 13 (which on another division was well liked for its trouble-free operation, despite that number). And B&O's famous Dockside or "Little Joe" 0-4-0T's that worked Pratt Street were also oil-fired.

Quote:
And B&O's famous Dockside or "Little Joe" 0-4-0T's that worked Pratt Street were also oil-fired.

Those Pratt Street engines took advantage of the oil firing when switching inside buildings, which was common on that job. One of the former firemen on the job told me they would just turn the oil burner off when going inside, operate for a while as a "fireless cooker", then fire it back up when they got outside again to avoid smoking the place up.

The original thread, just in case there is interest:

http://server.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=29099&st=0&sk=t&sd=a

Enjoy.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010, 07:18:18 AM by J3a-614 » Logged
RAM

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« Reply #211 on: June 29, 2010, 11:00:15 PM »

Many railroad used oil for the passenger locos.
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ebtnut

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« Reply #212 on: June 30, 2010, 01:34:33 PM »

Eastern roads that had oil-fired locos usually did it to meet smoke abatement laws.  Railroads in the far West used oil routinely since it was abundant and cheaper that having to ship in coal from elsewhere.  Typically, the roads uses what was often referred to as "Bunker C" oil.  This stuff was just about one step above asphalt and needed to be warm to flow properly.  No problem in a hot southern California summer, but up on Donner Pass in the winter was a different story.  Most road locos had heater coils in the tender, normally tied to steam from the loco to keep the oil liquid in cold weather. 
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J3a-614

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« Reply #213 on: July 03, 2010, 06:10:53 PM »

Hello, Jon,

Saw your comments about the crosshead links causing shorting problems at turnouts on the Bachmann saddletank thread, and did some thinking about possible remedies you might be able to use.  Keep in mind, however, that I don't own one of these things, so I'm having to guess at actions to take; you may find they are no good for you.  At the same time, an engine that gives problems like this isn't much good either, so here goes:

My first thought would be to raise the cylinder block up with a spacer of some sort, preferably one that could also double as an insulator.  If the interference is as little as you have suggested it might be, a couple of sheets of paper might be enough, possibly even one sheet if it's heavy enought (like from a shopping bag).  Keep in mind you want to raise your valve gear hangers, too, to keep the crosshead guides level.

A potential problem with this approach is that you will make that rearward slope of the superstructure more pronounced than it already is.  (By the way, this shows up in your earliest photos of the unaltered engine, so it's been there a while.)  Two possible ways to correct for this could include filing down the cylinder saddle, and shimming up the rear end.

Filing down the cylinder saddle is a slow and rather tedious job, which I found out on that Bowser K-11 I worked on, but it could get you a better fit between the boiler and the saddle as part of the result.  This is because a casting like that of the cylinder saddle has what is called a draft angle in it to allow the part to be withdrawn fron the mold.  In the case of the cylinder saddle, this angle may be in the middle of the saddle, running across the engine from one side to the other.  You can test for this by laying a straight and stiff piece of something, like a good hard ruler or a file along the line of the boiler (i.e., at right angles to the cylinder block), and seeing if it rocks just a little bit.  If it does, that's your draft angle.  Removing this will let the boiler (smokebox, actually) nestle down into the saddle along most of its length instead of riding on the crest of the draft angle; this also lowers the front of the superstructure very slightly, and may even be enough to level it.

The other option, shimming up the rear, is a bit more problematical because I don't have a Dockside in front of me to look at, and I've never worked on one.  If it's like a Mantua Booster (0-4-0T) I own, the superstructure fits into the rear footboards (which are part of the main frame) with a couple of little tabs going into slots.  If this is the case, there is likely some slack in the tab-slot connections that can be shimmed to raise the rear end up a little. Alternately, you could also do this and some very, very judicious and careful filing in the slots or even on the tabs, to get the movement upward you want; I don't have to tell you to be careful with this, as there isn't much you can take off in this area.  Of course, if your engine isn't like this, you're on your own, but maybe something here may be of help. 

Good luck, and keep us posted.  You've got me wanting to pick up one of those little buggers some day, the reason being that it used to be about every model railroader had one back when, including John Allen!
« Last Edit: July 03, 2010, 06:23:11 PM by J3a-614 » Logged
J3a-614

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« Reply #214 on: July 03, 2010, 06:32:18 PM »

I am an idiot, I should have looked at the first photos of the disassembled engine way back on page 1. It looks like all you have to do at the rear, if you have to do anything, is a little shimming on the frame; looks like the rear is held with a screw, with simplifies this sort of thing considerably.
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jonathan


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« Reply #215 on: July 03, 2010, 07:26:45 PM »

Actually the rear is held by a 'tongue and groove' type operation.  There is only one bolt, up front, that holds everything together at once.  Shimming up the rear wouldn't accomplish much.

I had to get a little creative with shims (business card stock) to get the angle just right on the crosshead guides.

I think I can file about 1/64" of material off the bottom of the crosshead links (slowly and carefully).  After that, I can apply a thin coat of 5-minute epoxy to the bottom of the crosshead link, screw and crosshead piece.  The epoxy should act as an insulator.  Not looking forward to trying this, but I have to try something to finish this thing and get it roadworthy.

Thanks for thinking of me J3a.  Every suggestion gets me thinking in a direction I hadn't considered.  That has solved more problems than I can remember.

Regards,

Jonathan
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jonathan


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« Reply #216 on: July 04, 2010, 07:22:03 AM »

J3a,

I keep relooking at it from all angles, trying to see this raised front.  A few of you have seen it.  My power of observation must be amiss.  I get the filing of the steam chest part.

I will do some careful observation and measuring when I open her up.  I have to redo the lights, anyway.  I burnt 'em out on my last run test.  Thought I was being clever with 1.5v bulbs, in series, and a resistor.  Now I'm a dolt.  Back to the drawing board.

Thanks,

Jonathan
`
« Last Edit: July 06, 2010, 05:25:05 AM by jonathan » Logged
J3a-614

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« Reply #217 on: July 07, 2010, 06:58:44 AM »

Just saw the photo with what I guess is the Neo Lube applied to the rods--looks great!  I'll have to pick some up myself.

The angle business mainly shows up in your broadside photos of the engine on the turntable.  The camera was shooting from a low angle, and these photos are the only ones the slope shows up in, and even then it's not terribly noticable.  If you don't see it with your own eyes, and it truthfully doesn't show up unless you are at that broadside angle and in a photo (cameras are very unforgiving), then I wouldn't worry about it too much.  Real engines can develop a sag, due to weak springs or spring rigging that is just "ornery:" fixing the latter involves jacking up the whole engine and a lot of work on the springs and equalizers to get the engine level again.

Again, it is amazing what the Neo Lube and chains do for the appearance.  Now, hopefully that clearance problem with the crosshead link will work out. . .
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jonathan


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« Reply #218 on: July 07, 2010, 07:59:38 AM »

Thanks, J3a-614.

I redid the lights this morning.  While I had it apart, I filed just a touch of material off the cradle.  I also filed about 1/64" off the bottom of the crosshead link.  All that's left is to install the rear coupler, do a little cleaning, and touch up a few areas here and there.

I will be preparing to take the final photos soon.  Give me a few days to get it all together, and I should be ready for the final post.

Regards,

Jonathan
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Doneldon

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« Reply #219 on: July 07, 2010, 02:06:33 PM »

Jonathan-

I have to pronounce this thread a treasure.  Do you realize it has (now) 219 comments and over 3200 viewings?  That's amazing.  The next closest on the HO front page has only 36, and it's another of yours about saddle tankers.  I think this is wonderful.  Here's a large segment of the modeling community which your project has brought together for several months to kibbutz a humble docksider.  I hope you realize what a positive contribution your little lokie and this thread have made to our hobby.  Thank you.
                                                                                                         -- D
« Last Edit: July 07, 2010, 02:09:38 PM by Doneldon » Logged
jonathan


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« Reply #220 on: July 07, 2010, 04:17:29 PM »

Your welcome, D.  And thanks to you, and our many forum friends, for making this dream a reality.  I wonder how many of us started with a lowly locomotive, such as this, that led to a lifelong love affair with trains.

As they say, "Anticipate!"  The unveiling is coming soon...

Regards,

Jonathan



« Last Edit: July 07, 2010, 04:21:14 PM by jonathan » Logged
bandmguy
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« Reply #221 on: July 07, 2010, 05:30:37 PM »

It was not unusual to see a loco with a tilted cab or a tender that that was sloped to the front. One of the EBT locos comes to mind with the bent tender, it' was been fixed.
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jonathan


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« Reply #222 on: July 08, 2010, 04:41:06 AM »

The Vogel Locomotive Works has finally released the Dockside Switcher.

Catharsis.

From the bottom of my heart, many thanks to PD(come back soon), Woody, Jim B., Tim, J3a-614, B&ORRF, Doneldon, Ray, Jerryl, lexon, ebtnut, ebtbob, tac, Matt, RAM, pipefitter, JBJ and NMWTRR.  Your input and guidance has made this project really fun and rewarding.  If I missed anyone, I am deeply sorry.

First the business:

The tow chains are temporary (have a more prototypical size on order).  Also getting a brass B&O herald for the nose.

The headlight lens is the original jewel.  I sanded off the backing, turned it backwards, and attached with white glue.  It looks good in person.  It didn't photograph well--too reflective I guess.  The other lenses are MV products.  Lower switcher headlight was a bear to add (clearance).

The lights work, two in front, one in the rear.  They are a little dim, but after two previous attempts at bright lights, I gave up and installed 12v GOR bulbs (parallel).

Discovered the drive wheels are not spaced to NMRA standards.  They are a little narrow.  I had to file out a little material off the rail guides on some of my turnouts.  The Varney now passes through OK, and the modification doesn't seem to affect the other rolling stock (fingers crossed).  Li'l Joe can only operate on my upper loop which is all code 100 rail.

She runs pretty good for 63 years old, a little wobbly, but I ain't complainin'.

Should I weather it?  I still really like Earl Smallshaw's Doxie.  And yes, it's a Varney.  I blew up the photo.  The builder's plate shows a "V" up close.  Hard to tell.  The shadows made it look like a "T".

Here are photos of the completed work.

Regards,

Jonathan

































P.S.  I was going to recreate the original 1947 ad for the Li'l Joe, but Chesterfield cigarrettes are a little rare.  Just wouldn't have any class sitting on top a pack of Marlboros or Kools.  Smiley
« Last Edit: July 08, 2010, 09:34:14 AM by jonathan » Logged
J3a-614

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« Reply #223 on: July 08, 2010, 06:40:35 AM »

Congratulations!  The engine looks great, she sits level now, and from what you said the clearance problem has been worked out. 

You have a little jewel, an an hierloom from your grandad, and now from you (even if an insurance company wouldn't recognise it as such); we here know better. . .

Again, congratulations. . .I can say no more. . . 
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ebtnut

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« Reply #224 on: July 08, 2010, 11:45:17 AM »

Johnathon:  You should be proud of your perseverance and the final results.  She looks real good.  Adding that brass dome plate to the front will be a nice finishing touch.  Gives us all some hope and inspiration that craftsmanship in this hobby ain't dead just yet. Cheesy
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