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Author Topic: White Pass & Yukon 2-4-2  (Read 2299 times)
dallasj100

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« on: July 04, 2010, 12:17:56 AM »

Looking for information about a large-scale loco & tender I have seen... basically dark green, with livery and road name as "White Pass & Yukon", "W.P. & Y.R.", No. 9. Appears to be a 2-4-2 design, which I am unfamiliar with, and I do not know the Bachmann model number. Nice looking little train - smoke, sound and headlight equipped.
Thanks in advance...
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Doneldon

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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2010, 01:26:09 AM »

dallas -

There weren't too many of these Whyte classification Columbia lokies because the extra firebox capacity was wasted on a loco with only four drivers.  That's why there were so many 4-4-0s.  There weren't a lot of locos with trailing trucks until the machines started to get pretty big, with six, eight, or even ten drivers.  The White Pass was a real railroad but I don't know if they actually had any Columbias.  It was a narrow gauge pike which was built for the 1898 Klondike gold rush and it still exists today as a mainly tourist railroad.
 
                                                                                        -- D


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dallasj100

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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2010, 08:24:03 AM »

Donaldon...

Thank you for your information - a good starting point for some further research.

Much obliged...
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on30gn15


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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2010, 11:18:07 AM »

There weren't a lot of locos with trailing trucks until the machines started to get pretty big, with six, eight, or even ten drivers. 

Don't leave out the 4-4-2 Atlantics -
according to page 121 of Kalmbach's Steam Locomotive Cyclopedia
Quote
About 2000 Atlantics were built from 1900 to 1906, after which the increasing weight of trains favored larger engines.

Hey, that book might say something about 2-4-2 types, hang on . . .
page 63, with a side and end view of a 2-4-2,
highlights
2-4-2T was common in tank engines but not tender engines
BLW used trailing wheels to allow for larger firebox by extending to rear
soon wide fireboxes above trailing truck were incorporated
Between that and the 4-4-2 the use of wider fireboxes became common
In the end, though,
Quote
But the 2-4-2 Columbia type was too small otherwise to make the most of the new invention and became extinct.
"New invention" being the wide firebox above a trailing truck.
got Columbia name from 1893 Baldwin Locomotive Works sample exhibited in Chicago ath the "World's Columbian Exhibition", whatever that was about.
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When all esle fials, go run trains
Screw the Rivets, I'm building for Atmosphere!
later, Forrest
Doneldon

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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2010, 02:52:02 PM »

on30-

Yes, I neglected to mention the Atlantics.  But those were high speed, longer distance, full train haulers which could make use of the extra steaming capacity.  And the 2-4-2Ts don't really count because their trailing trucks were compelled by the need to balance a locomotive with a coal hopper or oil tank hanging on the back end.  I believe that was a major consideration for the tank Prairies as well. 

Thank you for the derivation of the Columbia name.  I didn't know it but I'm glad you included the information because, as a native Chicagoan - the city, not the suburbs - I take pride in all things Chicago.

                                                                                             -- D
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on30gn15


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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2010, 09:43:52 PM »

... for the tank Prairies as well...

Hey, the 2-6-2 tender version - years back Model Die Casting Roundhouse had a little HO scale white metal kit for an ATSF one I thought looked kind of nice.
But somehow never did get around to getting one  Sad

How big would a 1/24 scale one of them be . . . ?

Oh oh oh! Somewhere around here is photo copy of plans of one of the real ones out of an old Model Railroader.
Search objective for tomorrow!!!
Extreme bash of a Big Hauler drive?
(I'll never finish the projects I have already  Undecided )
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When all esle fials, go run trains
Screw the Rivets, I'm building for Atmosphere!
later, Forrest
Doneldon

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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2010, 12:08:13 AM »

on30-

Some of the Santa Fe Prairies were pretty good sized locomotives.  I've even seen pictures of them in helper service!
                                                                        -- D
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davido

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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2010, 03:14:35 AM »

 Hi Dallas

I noticed that part of your original question about Bachmann's Item number for this loco has not been answered and hope that the following quote from the 1999 catalogue will be helpful :

“ 2-4-2 STEAM LOCOMOTIVE & TENDER
With an all new motor, metal gear box, metal bearings, and all-metal wheels, our 2-4-2- Columbia Locomotive is ready for active duty on rosters around the world.  We have completely updated this locomotive’s drive train for more power, dependability and endurance. This is a beautiful model that will earn a reputation as one of your locomotives.  The 2-4-2 will be available in turn-of-the-century styling with a wood tender or as a “modern” locomotive with coal tender.”

Three models are illustrated:
91114   PENNSYLVANIA No 3 (Modern) with Coal Tender.
91119   WHITE PASS & YUKON No 9 (Old Time) with Wood Tender
91170   PAINTED UNLETTERED (Modern) with Coal Tender

Davido
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