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| | |-+  Customizing Paint Scheme for OUR Roadname
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Author Topic: Customizing Paint Scheme for OUR Roadname  (Read 2355 times)
choochoodad

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« on: February 01, 2011, 10:17:08 AM »

We're looking for initial advice on how folks tend to customize their locos or coaches that have been purchased without any roadname. Do you paint them by hand? Print decals on inkjet/laserjet?

Thank you in advance.
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jonathan


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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2011, 10:51:13 AM »

choochoodad,

I have read about several methods for decorating your own rolling stock.  Here's how I do it:

1.  Make sure the piece is clean:  washed, free of dirt, dust and fingerprints.

2. Spray paint a light coat of primer: I use grey primer; either testors or floquil work just fine.  Let dry for 24-48 hours.

3. Spray paint the main color in a gloss paint.  This allows the decals to stick to the finish.  Let dry for 24-48 hours.  Sometimes a second coat is necessary.  A gloss finish will look a little uneven.  The shine shows every imperfection.  I try not to let that bother me.  

4.  I use premade decals from Microscale or Champ.  Champ Decals are no longer produced, but can still be found at train shows or on eBay.  Some folks make their own decals using their PC printer.  I have not tried that, yet.

5.  Apply one or two coats of Microsol to the decals, along with poking holes in any bubbles you see in the decals.  The Microsol softens the decals and allows them to mold to any rivets and the like.  Let dry for about an hour.

6.  Apply a thin coat of Testor's Dullcote to the whole piece.  This kills the shine and hides the decal lines.

7.  This is when I add any fine painting details with a brush, i.e. bells, whistles, grab irons, etc.

8.  Weather to taste.  I tend not to weather much, as I don't like my technique, yet.

9.  Another fine mist of dullcote and call it a day.

Regards,

Jonathan
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 10:56:38 AM by jonathan » Logged
ACY

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« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2011, 02:35:15 PM »

You can also use dry transfer/rub on decals for the lettering and logos. Unless you own an Alps printer with special cartridges you cannot print white ink, so if you need anything with white you will have to buy the decals. Testors and other companies sell decals paper in both white and clear. The white cannot be seen through, so it would completely cover everything, but the clear is see through and can be used as long as you don't need white and aren't applying it to a dark color.
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jward


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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2011, 02:54:25 PM »

if you do decide to use a printer to make your decals be sure you are using waterproof ink, and that you seal the decals after you print them but before you apply them to your locomotive.

i found this supplier through a web search. i have never ordered from them, but this will give you some ideas on having custom decals made....

http://home.mindspring.com/~elstrains/index.html
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
BradKT

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« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2011, 07:34:32 PM »

ACY: They now have decal paper for an inkjet printer that has a white background field for you to print against.  I have used it with decent results.

You are correct, of course, that the type of decal paper for an inkjet printer that I am referring to is not the ordinary decal paper.  On the ordinary decal paper, what appears to be a "white" background is actually clear.
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ACY

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« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2011, 07:45:57 PM »

ACY: They now have decal paper for an inkjet printer that has a white background field for you to print against.  I have used it with decent results.

You are correct, of course, that the type of decal paper for an inkjet printer that I am referring to is not the ordinary decal paper.  On the ordinary decal paper, what appears to be a "white" background is actually clear.
Then you have to cut very precisely around the decal, otherwise you will have excess white. I have used both types, but found the white background to be difficult to work with becuase I have to cut around the decal so closely to minimize the white or print the outer area of the decal in the same color as where it is being applied then apply dull coat and then weather it a bit.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2011, 04:19:51 AM »

In my experience, the white decal film has limitations. For example, it really doesn't work to make a more opaque background because every little bit of the while must be removed and that isn't realistic. It can be useful in making a "panel" of white or any other color used as the background color. This is pretty good for signs but doesn't necessarily solve decalling problems on rolling stock.
                                                                                                           -- D
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rbryce1

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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2012, 09:29:52 AM »

Jonathon,

Thanks, really great info on painting rolling stock.
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M1FredQ

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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2012, 05:19:46 PM »

From model airplane building days once you lay your decals down on a "GLOSSY FINISH".

Make sure once they are dry you then overcoat them with "FUTURE ACRYLIC FLOOR WAX"

The Acrylic locks and protects the decals and preserves them. Once it is dry you can use some dull coat to take some of the "shine' away!!!!!!!!!!!!

For weathering you can use very little dry-brushing which adds dimension and depth to your

piece. If weathering scares you you can use weathering chalks and brush it on if you don't

like it just wipe and brush it off!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Doneldon

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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2012, 02:11:10 AM »

Be sure to seal the weathering chalks with a product like Testor's Dull Coat.

                                                                                   -- D
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