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Author Topic: Parallel track with #6 turnout  (Read 2055 times)
whizamit

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« on: March 11, 2011, 04:20:59 AM »

Hello,

I am trying to a branch line connection to my main line using #6 turnouts to get a layout like this.

          ================
         /                                    \
==========================

I assume i need to curved track sections to hook up to both the #6 turnouts and then use straight sections to join the top part.

Any suggestions on what kind of curved section is needed? i think it might be 1/3 of 18 inch curve or 1/2 of 22 inch curve.

Thanks
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2011, 10:25:25 AM »

Dear Whiz,

http://www.bachmanntrains.com/home-usa/board/index.php/topic,14693.0.html

http://www.bachmanntrains.com/home-usa/board/index.php/topic,13230.0.html

Long story short, 18"R-10 degree is close on the degrees, but way too short on the radius.  Cut your own from a longer radius curve, or Atlas flex track and cork.  

One other caveat, one of the links above has a reply that says the straight track (small fitter) assortment is not yet available.  

Time has passed and they are now in stock in various places (on-line, magazine ad or local hobby shop [LHS] ).

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 10:28:36 AM by Joe Satnik » Logged

If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
Len

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« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2011, 06:00:33 PM »

Took a shot at it with RR-Track, and this combination appears to work for making a passing siding with #6 turnouts with four 9in straights between them:

Cut two 10deg arcs out of a 22in radius curve. A full piece has a 22.25deg arc, so the pieces would be a little shorter than a 1/2 section. Use one on each of the turnout diverging legs to bring them back parallel with the main.

The passing track is made up of the following straight sections:

9.00in - 2
4.50in - 1
2.25in - 1
2.00in - 1
1.50in - 1

Once you have the basic configuration, you can add additional straights to the main and passing tracks as needed. Just use the same additional pieces with both.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Doneldon

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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2011, 10:48:34 PM »

Len-

A minor detail but a 22" radius curve has 22.5o of curvature.

                                                                             -- D
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2011, 12:40:46 AM »

what about Bachmanns crossover turnouts
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Len

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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2011, 08:16:12 AM »

Len-

A minor detail but a 22" radius curve has 22.5o of curvature.

                                                                             -- D


Oooops! Typing too fast and got an extra '2' in there.

You still chop the one piece into 2 pieces with 10deg arcs though.

Back when I was doing an early layout, I took a piece of poster board and drew 15, 18, 22in radius quarter circles on it with a yard stick "beam compass". Then I drew lines from the center point outward every 5deg of arc.

If I needed a 15deg 22in radius section, I'd lay it on the appropriate curve, line up the center line, and mark the cut location, and chop it off. I thought about adding additional arc lines, but it's easy enough to 'eyeball' the inbetween locations if you needed a 13deg arc section.

With plastic roadbed track I cut through the plastic with a 52TPI Zona saw, then snip the rails with a Xuron track cutter. This leaves minimal clean up to be done with a small file.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Joe Satnik


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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2011, 10:11:38 AM »

Jerry,

http://www.bachmanntrains.com/home-usa/board/index.php/topic,14014.0.html

Scroll down to my post. 

Hope this helps. 

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
Jerrys HO
Guest
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2011, 08:57:58 PM »

thanks Joe I thought I had a solution thats why you are here. I am new to HO had small O scale layout and got really bored with it. HO is more challenging. Stick around I may be needing alot of advice myself. Those were excellent links by the way.
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2011, 09:37:14 PM »

Jerry,

You're welcome.

Glad I could help.

Joe
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If your loco is too heavy to lift, you'd better be able to ride in, on or behind it.
BradKT

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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2011, 01:11:15 AM »

Try working it out using anyrail.com.  You can work out track issues using 50 pieces of track or less with a free program.  You can work it out using Bachmann track, Atlas track, or whatever.
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