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Author Topic: Damaged but Surviving Gorre & Daphetid Locomotives  (Read 46139 times)
ryeguyisme

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« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2011, 03:34:13 PM »


There is another engine I can't identify; it is the furthest to the right in this photo, next to a curving main line.  It's the tank engine mentioned above with a diamond stack, and is notable in that it has a saddle tank (wraps around the boiler), but the top of the tank is flat (suggesting an older prototype), and the engine appears to have a peaked cab roof, also typical of older locomotives (i.e., No. 8, the Sargent Ennis).

http://www.gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/The_Slides/Set_00/slides/s0_012_const_july57-orig.html

A slightly different angle:

http://www.gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/The_Slides/Set_01/slides/s1_007_const_july57-orig.html


That's john's invention of a steam powered snowplow, not rostered as motive power, this can be seen in action in the gorre and daphetid video footage in a snow scene that inspired him to have a permanent snow scene on the 3rd layout

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This is interesting--a tiny, European-looking narrow gauge tank engine, on a pedestal, apparently a preserved industrial locomotive; it's lined up above and behind No. 28's stack and a bulldozer in this photo.  Wonder what the story behind that one is?

http://www.gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/The_Slides/Set_00/slides/s0_079_westwardho28_feb70-orig.html


my guess is that he wanted to have like a narrow gauge memorial for a line that may have ran through andrews? No clue, it's mostly all standard gauge at Andrews I believe. But most interesting is the station to the right which has an atlas station and platform incorporated into it, I really wish I knew what components he used for the bottom half of that station whether he made it or came from another kit, I'd really light to build that station.

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This is interesting, several trolleys that do not look like the one Allen used for the Cooper electric line, and some orange traction motors (lower right corner).  Visiting equipment?

http://www.gdlines.com/GD_Galleries/The_Slides/Set_02/slides/s2_014_cablecar_july59-orig.html


my best guess is Dave Cooper's Trolleys to test the electrical overhead lines he made, John only had one trolley



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The "V&T"-looking 4-4-0 (Reno, straight stack) shows up in this photo, at the left in the photo at Angels Camp, just to the left of a long drovers' caboose, another visitor?

http://homepage.mac.com/doug56/G&D/page8.html

Have fun.

Most likely a visitor, after the second layout John had little interest in older power, he wanted mostly chunky engines with pulling power, so most likely a visitor, I think we came to that conclusion in the group when me and a few others pointed it out


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J3a-614

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« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2011, 04:10:37 PM »

Thanks for the answers, Rye; sounds like you and the Yahoo group have been having some heavy discussions on identifying this odd stuff here and there.

Looking at the Andrews station, it looks to me that the lower level is a homemade job.  The construction technique, based on the appearance of the windows in the lower brick section, appears to be a base of wood or perhaps cardboard, overlaid with brick paper--a common construction method from at least the 1940s into the at least the 1970s.  The windows themselves seem to be clear plastic with the muntins (window framing strips) painted or inked on; the plastic itself seems to be sanded, perhaps with fingers and an abrasive powder such as pumice, to give it "tooth" for the ink or paint to stick.  This, and the brick paper too, was a technique used very frequently by E. L. Moore, who wrote many structure scratchbuilding articles in Railroad Model Craftsman over the years.  The LCL freight platforms are the far right are modified from the Atlas kit's platforms; the doors in the lower level also appear to be Atlas depot components, possibly from the base kit's unseen rear wall.  John apparently didn't spend extra money on things like that! 

Trim would be stripwood, the base or foundation is likely also stripwood (strip and sheet styrene wouldn't have been commonly available until later).  I couldn't guess as to what the roof is; there would be several things to use for that.  The chimney appears to be a square piece of wood wrapped in brick paper again.  I think the stairs would have been a horrible scratchbuilding job then, but you can get very similar looking steps in plastic from Tichy today. 

Signs and weathering, of course would be to taste, although I wonder what method John used to weather the brick walls and not have the ink run or cause warping in the paper.  Of course, all this would have been well braced inside to prevent warping in general. 

It also appears the station was not quite complete at the time of the photo; that's a long and dangerous final drop at the bottom of those stairs! 
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ForThemPanzerz

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« Reply #62 on: September 25, 2011, 10:44:36 PM »

As my quote says "John Allan and the G&D need their own museum."
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ryeguyisme

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« Reply #63 on: September 25, 2011, 11:26:42 PM »

As my quote says "John Allan and the G&D need their own museum."

John has a whole section dedicated to him at the museum in Sacramento CA
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ForThemPanzerz

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« Reply #64 on: September 26, 2011, 06:34:25 PM »

As my quote says "John Allan and the G&D need their own museum."

John has a whole section dedicated to him at the museum in Sacramento CA
thats good, i think model railroader owns the last 2 operating G&D engines but their both in display cases.
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ryeguyisme

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« Reply #65 on: September 28, 2011, 07:53:11 PM »

one is at the museum and the other is in private hands
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J3a-614

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« Reply #66 on: October 06, 2017, 12:40:02 AM »

It's an old topic, but this ties in--commentary on John Allen and the Gorre & Daphetid by Jim Findley.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rK99FrHAHw
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