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Author Topic: new to model railroading  (Read 2501 times)
starman

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« on: February 10, 2007, 12:56:35 PM »

Gene,

thanks for your input.  Some additional info-Some Bachmann advertisements mention "chicken coop pilot slats" on the K4 Pacific locomotives which are pre-WWII.  I just wondered what it meant?

Starman
« Last Edit: February 10, 2007, 02:10:40 PM by starman » Logged
SteamGene

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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2007, 02:00:09 PM »

I've never heard the phrase before, but I'd assume it refers to  pilots with bars close enough together to resemble a chicken coop.   Obviously not a solid or switcher pilot.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
msowsun

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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2007, 06:04:17 PM »

There are 2 types of pilots on K-4 Pacifics.... Slatted and Solid:


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r.cprmier

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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2007, 02:10:35 PM »

To Gene et al;
Why would they use a solid pilot?  Not that it surprised me, but I could never figure it out, as many Pennsy steamers as I had seen.

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
GlennW

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« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2007, 04:18:57 PM »

The closed pilot may be used on passenger trains. Try to get pictures of K4's pulling the premier passenger trains of the line. The slatted ones may go to branchlines or freight runs. I doubt if there are many pictures of K4's doing some switching moves?
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SteamGene

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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2007, 07:23:46 PM »

Glenn, the PRR K4 was not used for freight and probaly not on many branchlines.  It was a heavy Pacific.  The solid pilot is probably a part of the GREAT STREAMLINING EXTRAVAGANZA!  No real reason for it, though at high speeds perhaps the wind got deflected from passing under the locomotive, though I'd think that lift would be negligible. 
Solid seems modern. 
Oh, well.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Tim
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« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2007, 11:25:50 PM »


The solid pilot on the Pennsy K4's was to add fornt end weight.
The same wsa done on the M1 mountain.
The extra weight improved tracking.

Tim Anders
Souderton, Pa
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