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Author Topic: Steam locomotives  (Read 13665 times)
Inder


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« Reply #60 on: September 19, 2007, 02:41:17 PM »

Thanks Gene,

Lesson 1:  When painting the wheels be careful not to get paint down on the actual wheel surface contact.

I did and after carefully scraping off all the paint from the wheel surface contact the little guy still runs a little rough without the tender.  Luckily once I put the tender back on it runs normal thanks to the additional contacts on the tender.

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ebtnut

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« Reply #61 on: September 27, 2007, 03:30:52 PM »

Loco painting, especially steam locos, is an art and a science.  Books could (and have been) written on the subject.  A few thoughts--for masking, consider using the "blue" masking tape from 3M.  It seems to have less adhesive residue problems than the traditional masking tapes.  For your drivers, lay the masking tape down on a smooth, clean surface (a piece of safety glass is good) and cut thin strips of tape with your hobby knife just wide enough to cover the treads.  Saves a lot of clean-up later.  In general, you should disassemble the model as much as possible, to make sure you get paint everywhere it needs to be.  Yes, it is a hassle, but you'll get a better job for it.  Use some common sense, though.  If your loco is a Bachmann or other RTR loco, and the frames are already black, leave it be--maybe use a regular paint brush to apply a bit of weathering behind the wheels to highlight it a bit.  In general, use a gloss or semi-gloss paint for your base coat, so decals will be much easier to apply.  Use your dulling agent and/or weathering to flatten the finish down as needed.  You want to keep a bit of shine on areas like boiler shells, tender sides, etc. that don't collect dirt and soot as readily as horizontal surfaces. 
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Inder


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« Reply #62 on: September 27, 2007, 04:47:16 PM »

Thanks for the advice.
I did have the blue masking tape in mind for use when painting my locomotives.  i will certainly use that.

I have applied a coat of gloss on the boiler but I want to apply a light, or minute amount of soot on the top section of the boiler to show fallout from the smoke stack but I don't think a brush is the correct device to do this.
I do not currently own an airbrush but Gene recommended a good one.
My question is, will an airbrush be the correct device to apply a light amount of soot at the top of the boiler to show smoke fallout?

I have practiced a lot weathering my box cars to look dirty and grimy.  However I also want to have some look aged and faded by the sun.  I tried applying white paint but no matter how diluted I make the paint I'm not happy with the results because I see the brush stroke and pattern.
I don't know if I should try cotton swabs or maybe this needs to be put off until I purchase an airbrush.  Some book mentioned weathering chalks but I'm not sure that is a good method. 

Also, I purchased some broken locomotives on Ebay and I have given them a full coat of rust all over as well as some other shades of black and gray.  I plan to use theses as decoration around the yard once I put my layout together.  Is this something that was common to find?  None of the pictures  I have looked at show junked locomotives in the yards.
Anyway, I thought it would be a nice touch.
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Scott S

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« Reply #63 on: September 27, 2007, 05:34:48 PM »

In any period older locomotives would have been retired and ultimately scrapped.

This happened intensively in the late '40s and though the 50's as railroads switched to diesels.

An HO layout that is (or was, 2 or more years ago) on display in the Wenham Museum (Wenham, MA) includes a scene that portrays a steamer being cut up. Has a bright little bulb in a circuit flashing in or by the boiler to mimic a cutting torch.
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SteamGene

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« Reply #64 on: September 27, 2007, 05:52:02 PM »

A yard might well have a "dead track" which was where retired locomotives went to await their fate.  They were normally coupled together to conserve space and in no particular order.  Stored locomotives - one not in active service but ready to be recalled were treated the same way. 
Try dry brushing white - where you use a stiff brush and remove most of the paint with a paper towel before applying this.  I've seen great work under letter using this meethod.
Chalks work well, but you need to set them with Dullcoat and apply several layers to get the proper effect.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Inder


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« Reply #65 on: September 27, 2007, 09:26:46 PM »

Wow it took me a while to understand the concept but i get it.
I can't wait to try it.  I will do it tonight.  Thanks
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rogertra


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« Reply #66 on: September 28, 2007, 01:21:32 AM »

Gene.

Just so happens that I picked up a partially assembled MDC 2-8-0 that I'm right in the middle of prepping for the scrap line.

First thing I did was to remove the motor so that the loco can freewheel.

I've removed the piston rods and they're currently strapped to the running boards, the stack's been capped, headlight removed and I'm blocking out the cab windows.  The tender will be modelled empty, a bit of kitbashing required there, and working Kadee couplers will be added fore and aft.

Why working Kadees you may ask? 

Every once in a while, the loco will become a "load" and will required to be switched out of the scrap line and into a wayfreight for haulage to Montreal, where the GER's main shops are located, for scrapping.  It will reappear on the modelled portion of the railway as a loco for scrap in-transit to Montreal and will be set out onto the scrap line until room is available for it in the Montreal scrap yard.

I'm always on the look out for suitable locos that I can use to populate a 36" long scrap line.  After all, I model 1958 and there were sadly many locos awaiting scrapping at many, many roundhouses.

« Last Edit: September 28, 2007, 01:23:03 AM by rogertra » Logged

Inder


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« Reply #67 on: September 28, 2007, 01:41:20 AM »

Rogertra,

What scale is that?
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SteamGene

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« Reply #68 on: September 28, 2007, 09:22:27 AM »

Roger does HO.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
ebtnut

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« Reply #69 on: September 28, 2007, 10:37:27 AM »

Inder - Yes, the airbush is the best way to apply weathering.  For soot effect, I would use something like Grimy Black.  Make sure you thin it A LOT.  Make a couple of light passes, then let the paint dry for a couple of minutes and see what it looks like.  In weathering, you don't want to see the paint; rather you want to see the "effect" of the paint.  As for weathering rolling stock, Floquil used to make a weathering color called "Dust".  I don't know if they have an equivalent in thier acyrlics line or not.  It was/is a greyish off-white, and again, thin it out before applying.  A quick shot of Dust, and a quick shot of your thinned Grimy Black from the top will give you a quick, decent weathering job.  If you can't find "Dust", try mixing up about 2 parts Reefer Grey to 1 part White, thin it down, and try that. 
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Inder


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« Reply #70 on: September 29, 2007, 09:01:15 PM »

To create a faded look I use white paint heavily watered down.
Then I apply it on the model and as the diluted paint collects at the bottom of the model I then remove the excess amount with the brush.

The results:  No brush stroke and the paint is distributed evenly throughout the model.


It's phenomenal.
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #71 on: September 30, 2007, 09:35:11 AM »

There are some chemicals (no, not drugs) that, when compounded with-say-Na (salt) will create some interesting weathering.

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Inder


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« Reply #72 on: October 01, 2007, 12:12:53 AM »

r.cprmier.

Do tell what these secret chemicals are.  I want to create this magical weathering potion.

--------

I found this guy online who creates spectacular weathered rolling stock.  Unfortunately it's all HO scale and I model N scale.
But I started taking ideas from him and he's been very influential.  Last night my friend and I practically cloned one of his designs.  I'm so proud I almost wanna shoot him an e-mail thanking him and showing him my little clone of his art. 
You guys think it's bad to borrow heavily from someone else's designs?
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rogertra


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« Reply #73 on: October 01, 2007, 02:14:32 AM »

Inder.

Weathering is a non scale detail.  it doesn't matter what scale you model, all weathering is the same.  There is no such thing a "HO" scale or "N" scale or even "O" scale weathing, it's all just "weathering".

Best tip anyone can give you it start with very light weathering.  It's easier to add weathering than it is to take it away.

You also don't need expensive airbrushes.  I don't own one yet I'm quite happy with my weathering efforts.

Just pluck up the courage and have a go.
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Inder


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« Reply #74 on: October 01, 2007, 02:33:51 AM »

Thanks rogertra,

Now, if I want to post pictures here to get some tips can I do that? 
Or do they have to go into the photo gallery or maybe I can link them to a website? 
I don't have a website for my train pictures, do you guys recommend one?
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