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Author Topic: Central Vermont 2-10-4 -- T-3-a  (Read 3434 times)
Zytx


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« on: October 06, 2007, 09:34:10 PM »

hello,

Got a few photos to share of the progress on making a Central Vermont 2-10-4, aka the 700 Class. Progress has been sort of slow, due to a new work schedule, but it's coming along nicely.

I started with a Canadian/Canadien National 2-10-2 because the CV 2-10-4 was essentially a CN 2-10-2 Class T-3-a with a 4 wheel trailing truck. I took a Rivarossi tender & cut a 1 inch section out of the middle. That was easy. What took about 3 frusterating hours was to get the DCC board in & in place because the Vandy tender does not come apart. The rear end comes off, but I seem to have fat fingers because it was almost a nightmare to get the original truck, spring, & screw held in one hand, while the other hand tries to hook the metal washer & the DCC eyelet over the screw tip. Then came the nut. Thankfully the thread pattern matched the Rivarossi threads. I put a dab of hot glue over the end of the truck screws after I got them all in place, just to make darn sure they wouldn't back out. Before I placed & reglued the rear of the tender on, I drilled out a place for the headlamp off the Bachmann tender. Four 1/4 ounce selfsticking tire weights & the mounting of the rear lamp & door.

The DCC board fits nicely inside. It got electrical tape over the entire bottom because I didn't want any short circuts. Another 5 tireweights went in the very bottom for weight & balance. Styrene cut to fit, fixed the coal bunker into a square one like the CV had. Plastistruct I-Beam heated over a candle & bent into the square shape became the "Banjo Frame" over the trailing truck. The pin for pulling is an old machine screw pressed into a piece of styrene & glued to the floor of the tender. The tender originally had a full length weight that came out & got set aside for other projects, but it was the weight that the trucks screwed into (I used the nuts & washers from the Bachmann tender) & the weight also had the pulling pin in it, that I replaced with a better looking machine screw.

The trailing truck started out as a Bennendorf 40' tanker truck that I ground down & shaped into the trailing truck shape. one wheel is a 33'' (original freight car wheel) & the bigger wheel is a 40'' athearn passenger one.

The number boards were built out of small styrene pieces. The Elesco feedwater was a kit I bought from Yardbird designs. I'm using a mix between Ambriod Proweld glue (<-- help! I need more & can't find any anywhere Sad ), & Walthers Goo.

The photos are a little big to show the detail. I'll post one here, & if you want the other 3 images, post here & I'll post them on this thread.

[img]http://download.lavadomefive.com/members/RDFlambouyant/projects/2104B.jpg[img]


Thanks,
Rob
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Zytx


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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2007, 09:41:59 PM »

trying this image again...

</img src="http://download.lavadomefive.com/members/RDFlambouyant/projects/2104B.jpg">

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Guilford Guy


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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2007, 09:58:12 PM »

That is looking Great!!!
I take it you are scratchbashing a new trailing truck.
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Alex

Zytx


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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2007, 10:01:26 PM »

trying too. Don't have as much free time as I used too.. Altho I think I'll stay with what I have so far, because it operates on my 24'' raduis curves just fine. I would hate to tinker & screw that up. Wink


Bob
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Jake

"Scenic route of the world"


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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2007, 12:28:57 PM »


Actually, it should be
Code:
[img]http://download.lavadomefive.com/members/RDFlambouyant/projects/2104B.jpg[/img]

And without the code tags...



Tada! Good job on the kitbash I must say!
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Zytx


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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2007, 01:09:14 PM »

Oh, silly me, I forgot the / in the end brackets Tongue

Here's the other 3 images since I see that the forum automatically resizes the images Cheesy







Thanks,
Bob
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2007, 09:31:28 PM »

Which company makes the Elesco feedwater heater?
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Zytx


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« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2007, 09:50:35 PM »

I got mine from a guy on Ebay.

His stuff is here: http://toys.search.ebay.com/_HO-Scale_W0QQcatrefZC12QQfrppZ25QQsacatZ19128QQsassZyardbirdtrains


Bob
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2007, 02:35:52 PM »

Elesco feedwater system componemts are made by Cal-Scale, and Carey Locomotive works.

I prefer brass to plastic for two reasons:  the resolution is better, and the weight factor..

Most of my engines are "redesigned" with the equstion in mind that dictates the conditions of the road, the type of freight, and frequency of runs.  In reality it doesn't amount to diddly; but in a simulated world, it is a challenge, both to my knowledge of what these machines can do, and what makes them do it.  It will also mandate that you better your skills in  all pertinent areas of this segment.

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
r.cprmier

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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2007, 10:09:09 PM »

Rob;
Great work.  If you want some reference, go to www.divisionpoint.com and they  have some nice shots of your Texas.  The one they are showing is brass, I believe.

RIch

PS:  This winter sometime,  Iwill be starting my conversion of a C&O Texas type.
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Zytx


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« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2007, 05:36:33 PM »

Funny you should say that Rich. Wink as the price tag of $1600 bucks is simply too much for a "toy". So I decided to build my own.

I have several stacks of actual blueprints on the very locomotive. The darn prints are about 20ft long O.o. I live up here still, in st. albans, the very stamping grounds of the old beasts, so getting photos or blueprints are quite an easy thing Smiley

Thanks,
Bob
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Zytx


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« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2007, 09:53:49 PM »

Question: Can I get a flanged driver for the main center of the 2-10-2?

Z
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RAM

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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2007, 10:16:37 PM »

Question: Did the prototype have a flanged driver for the main center of the 2-10-2?  Some did not.
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2007, 05:12:44 PM »

Bob;
I have two prints of them:  One in Palmer, Mass; the other, in Rutland.  I liked them as appearances went.

RIch
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
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