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Author Topic: Any suggestions for Bachmann's future models?  (Read 33458 times)
ryeguyisme

Heavy Mountain Steam


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« Reply #135 on: October 22, 2015, 10:47:15 PM »

Another thing we need is having all wheel pickup on the tender trucks-

It is very encouraging seeing a lot of discussion on Steam Locomotives more than anything..

how about some rolling stock? I would like to see bachmann produce drop bottom gondolas and fruit express reefers or single sheath outside braced boxcars.

Maybe produce some unique MOW equipment like a Ditcher or a Rotary Snowplow

For passenger cars how about wood sided palace heavyweight passenger cars?

It would also be neat to see model kits as well, like an intercity coal dock/coal dealer, a wooden coal mine like some that are found in old pictures of Utah, maybe a drawbridge, steel viaducts, factory buildings, etc.
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rogertra


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« Reply #136 on: October 23, 2015, 12:00:11 AM »


Another thing we need is having all wheel pickup on the tender trucks-


A big Y E S for all wheel pick up tender trucks.  Nothing improves the pick up like those and it's cheap upgrade.

Why Bachmann hasn't done this in the past is a mystery.

Cheers

Roger T.

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electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #137 on: October 23, 2015, 07:45:46 AM »

Roger, Jonathan, et al;
Given plastic/non-conductive frames, isn't what is out there-for the most part-sufficient?  I latched onto a couple of pairs of brass express tender trucks (I like the looks) and found that they had isolated the wheels from the frame via a couple of plastic bushings; similar to the set-up Don Tichy offers. 

I just picked up a couple of pairs of Bachmann tender trucks and find these to be good for a pickup set-up-and they will give me peace of mind.
If you really want to do this, you can fabricate out of Phosphor Bronze flat stock, pickups to your respective configuration.  These, of course, could be installed on the  trucks in a beneficial way; using the isolating quality of Bachmann's trucks, and being careful not to distort the shape. 
Roger, Wayne, Jonathan, etc.; would probably have no trouble doing this.  Otherwise; other parts makers like Tomar, make sliders that slide along the rail.

Rich C.
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rogertra


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« Reply #138 on: October 23, 2015, 01:39:46 PM »

I make easy tender wheel pick up wipers using Kadee No. 5 coupler centring 'springs'.  The brass flat spring.

However, I only have to do that because Bachmann doesn't, which is too bad as it's an easy fix for Bachmann to carry out.

Cheers

Roger T.



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electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #139 on: October 23, 2015, 08:19:29 PM »

Roger;
Some time ago, I had thought about laying out a sheet-metal print for something reminiscent of the Tomar wipers; and  I will do it.  Micro-Mark has this photo-etch set-up.  I haven't looked at it closely, but ostensibly will probably just have a plate or two photo-etched out of phosphor bronze (which is what those Kadee springs are made of) at my friendly neighbourhood photo-etch shoppe...
What I would like to do is secure them to the inside of the truck side-frame, cornered under the bolster, but I will have to develop that set-up.  As I had started to say; I saw that photo-etch equipment and the price is what shoos me off.  Out of a 6X12 sheet of .008 phosphor bronze, one can get a lot of these little puppies, so the initial investment is really a negative..
Picked up some parts, so I am going to do more loco building.  The stuff I "create" falls a little on the diminutive side, looks-wise.  Sometimes I wish TT scale had taken off big-I still think it would have been an ideal scale.

RIch C. 
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Rashputin

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« Reply #140 on: October 23, 2015, 11:44:21 PM »

Several of you folks obviously have a good bit of experience with improving electrical pickup so maybe you could give me your opinion of "Keep alive" capacitors (?) in engines as opposed to adding pickup to the tender and so forty. I gather that the storage approach such circuits use will keep an engine going across a reasonably long section of completely dead track.

Is that sort of thing an adjunct to or a replacement for the sort of modifications you folks make?
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electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #141 on: October 24, 2015, 03:39:59 PM »

Wayne;
There exists a circuit that the old timers(?) used; it consists of a dry-cell battery, a switch and a capacitor/resistor filter type device.  This was primarily used for turnout machines using a solenoid coil.  You can vary the amount of voltage "leakage" by varying the combination of values to the resistor and capacitor; hence the amount of "snap" given to "snap-switches"...(ha ha ha).  For an added  control, use a coil to smooth things out nicely.
I was looking on "Tony's Trains" site today, and they have an  equivalent to this for DCC.  The unit has a pretty hefty sized cap on it; this of course, will get a locomotive across a big turnout configuration, dirty track, etc.  Given the nature of electron behaviour, I would say that this should work in a straight DC circuit as well; as by the time that voltage gets to the motors, LEDs, etc., it is DC  anyways.

Rich C..
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jbrock27

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« Reply #142 on: October 25, 2015, 08:33:16 AM »

Wayne, do you happen to run all of your rolling stock with metal wheels?  The majority maybe?
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Keep Calm and Carry On
jbrock27

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« Reply #143 on: October 25, 2015, 07:43:12 PM »

As Arte Johnson would say, verrrry interesting.

Thank you doctowayne.
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Trainman203

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« Reply #144 on: October 25, 2015, 08:05:24 PM »

Wayne, I like the mixed train with the combine.  Not many people run them or even know what they are.  They are a thing from the distant past.

A mixed train is my only passenger service, but on two levels.  The extra-fare one has the combine, and for the extra money the passenger gets wooden seats that are sanded so you don't "get" splinters, ice in the water cooler, and the overalls wearing conductor wears a passenger service cap with a brass badge.  And the train has a name, the "Midland Limited."  The lower level mixed is a drovers caboose with none of the amenities.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
RAM

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« Reply #145 on: October 25, 2015, 10:08:07 PM »

Well I think flat wheels went out 40 year ago, if not longer.  They were great for picking points and derailing.  As far as mixed trains.  The Santa Fe a lot of them in the mid west.  I loved visiting Ottawa Kansas.  They ran two mixed trains.  One went to Topeka, out one day, and back the next.  It had either a 2-8-0 or a 2-6-2 and a combine on the end.  The other one ran 6 days a week, with a Doodlebug.  I think the maximum number of cars was 7.  If it had more than that they would use a 2-8-0 or 2-6-2 and a combine on the end.      
« Last Edit: October 25, 2015, 10:09:56 PM by RAM » Logged
J3a-614

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« Reply #146 on: October 25, 2015, 10:55:22 PM »

Wayne, I like the mixed train with the combine.  Not many people run them or even know what they are.  They are a thing from the distant past.

A mixed train is my only passenger service, but on two levels.  The extra-fare one has the combine, and for the extra money the passenger gets wooden seats that are sanded so you don't "get" splinters, ice in the water cooler, and the overalls wearing conductor wears a passenger service cap with a brass badge.  And the train has a name, the "Midland Limited."  The lower level mixed is a drovers caboose with none of the amenities.

Mixed trains aren't too far into the past, or at least I don't think they are.

The Wabash had a mixed train that ran into the early years of the merger with the Norfolk & Western, and the C&O had a mixed train that ran to the resort at Hot Springs, Va.  This was as late as 1968 or 1969, and amazingly was a Pullman connection with sleeping cars from the main line trains (connection was at Clifton Forge, actual junction was at Covington).  

The B&O had mixed train service right to Amtrak day between Huntington, W.Va. and Parkersburg, connecting with main line trains at the latter point.  This was actually a ride in a caboose as opposed to a coach. 

I think the Georgia Railroad ran a mixed even later, into the 1970s.  

Finally, the Reader Railroad in Arkansas ran a mixed train into the 1970s--behind steam, no less.  This was one of the last regular service steam shortlines, and the road attempted supplement its freight income with a bit of tourist money.  
« Last Edit: October 25, 2015, 10:58:57 PM by J3a-614 » Logged
rogertra


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« Reply #147 on: October 26, 2015, 02:12:47 AM »

Wayne, I like the mixed train with the combine.  Not many people run them or even know what they are.  They are a thing from the distant past.

A mixed train is my only passenger service, but on two levels.  The extra-fare one has the combine, and for the extra money the passenger gets wooden seats that are sanded so you don't "get" splinters, ice in the water cooler, and the overalls wearing conductor wears a passenger service cap with a brass badge.  And the train has a name, the "Midland Limited."  The lower level mixed is a drovers caboose with none of the amenities.

I also run a mixed on my branch line from Farnham to Magog (reverse loop staging).  Used a Rivarossi (?) combine with added smoke stacks to represent the three caboose style coal stoves typically used to heat the car in winter.  One in the baggage area and two in the passenger section.  It gets cold in Quebec in the middle of winter.

Cheers

Roger T.   
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Trainman203

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« Reply #148 on: October 26, 2015, 10:24:12 AM »

I rode the Reader in 1963.  Later on, a friend of mine fired on that line.  Back home in Louisiana, both the MP and T&NO operated mixed service out of my home town on the branches that radiated  out.  The MP one went away in 1935, I remember the T&NO one in steam in 1955 just before it went out.

There were late survivors of mixed train service, it is true, but their time ended largely in the 30s when my MP one did, done in by roads and cars.

 Wayne I am mad at you.  That MDC combine looks way too good.  I could have had one but dilly dallied and now those palace cars are gone, for good. Now you are making me really want one.  I did get the observation car to make my business car though.

I have a couple of the MDC 50' open end truss rod combines on my mixed trains.  But I still want the palace combine.

However (Bachmann content), the Bach Man is soon bringing out a heavyweight steel combine.

What paint did you use on those cars?
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #149 on: October 26, 2015, 10:49:30 AM »

One in the baggage area and two in the passenger section.  It gets cold in Quebec in the middle of winter.

Yeah, Roger; but isn't that how you guys get so many Canadians?

Still working on the roster.  I will send photo or two when I take them.  If I have time today, I will start cutting out roadbed.  Retired?? HAH!
 Rich C.
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