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Author Topic: Any suggestions for Bachmann's future models?  (Read 40133 times)
jbsmith


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« Reply #105 on: October 16, 2015, 08:32:04 PM »

2-4-2 are interesting and different
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wiley209

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« Reply #106 on: October 16, 2015, 08:41:15 PM »

I think a train set similar to the Bachmann "Golden Star" set from the '90s should be made. For those unfamiliar...

In addition to the 7-unit train hauled by a Union Pacific GP40, it also included a 56x38" oval of E-Z Track, and several Plasticville kits like the Suburban Station, the Barn, Farm Buildings, the School House and the Signal Bridge, along with a picket fence set, park assortment, and the usual signs, poles and figures. Although this was originally made in the 90s, the stuff featured in this set is still made today, though the Union Pacific GP40 would obviously be the newer and improved model (compared to the older one used back then), and the rolling stock would have body-mount knuckle couplers. It's an ideal set for someone who wants to start out in building a model railroad town.
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rogertra


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« Reply #107 on: October 16, 2015, 11:02:40 PM »

Thanks for the kind words, guys.

Roger, there's a thread HERE with lots of photos on that rebuild, including the changes to the valve chest/cylinder assembly.


Wayne

Wayne.

Excellent.  I've booked marked it for future reference.

Many thanks.

Roger T.

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Skarloey Railway

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« Reply #108 on: October 17, 2015, 07:32:08 AM »

I don't get the idea that the 4-6-0 is too old-time looking. Not knowing the prototype I just checked the Ma & Pa version and the prototype was built in 1906 and retired in 1955. That covers the eras most steam-age modellers like to build.

Personally, the prototypes (both British and US) that would get me back into modelling date from the 1860s to 1910s.
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J3a-614

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« Reply #109 on: October 17, 2015, 04:33:07 PM »

So many having commented on the Backmann 4-6-0 looking older than they would like has finally gotten me to say a bit about that. . .

For the record, we've noted that the low-boiler, low driver vrsion is based on a Maryland & Pennsylvania prototype, and it wouldn't surprise me if the prototype was a stock engine and might have been build with a slightly different cylinder block and Stephenson valve gear.

To me, the high driver, high boiler version looks also llike a stock Baldwin design used as a passenger engine on a number of roads in the Deep South.

Something very similar went to a railroad in Nevada, and it runs there today:

http://museum.escubes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/7908.1324838376.jpg

http://museum.escubes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/IMG01425.jpg

http://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/fileSendAction/fcType/0/fcOid/33106235478270085/filePointer/33106235478270205/fodoid/33106235478270194/imageType/LARGE/inlineImage/true/IMG_4633.JPG

Now here's a really interesting detail about this engine, and it was also common on a lot of engines in the south, including on Southern Railway---take a closer look at the cylinder block and valve chest, particularly in the first photograph.  Also note the steam pipes coming out of the smokebox, such as would be for a piston-valve engine.  That's because this engine does have piston valves, in a so-called "universal" valve conversion "kit" that was available in the steam age.  The giveaway, besides the steam pipes, is the tall valve "box" with the circular end covers where the valves themselves are.  

This was, as noted, a fairly common conversion job, and was typically undertaken when a locomotive was converted from saturated to superheated steam; the latter didn't work too well with flat or "D" valves due to lubrication problems.  There was some debate on this among mechanical men about whether the lower cost savings of retaining the existing cylinder block might not be offset by better steam flow with a newer (but more expensive) cylinder block, but the item of note is that (a) such a prototype installation of flat valves and outside valve gear was not too unusual, and (b) we now have yet ANOTHER fun prototype example to follow!

No. 40 also has an early version of Baker valve gear.  Another engine with this type of valve gear is Strasburg (ex-N&W) 475, a 4-8-0.

The use of flat valves with outside gear was not limited to older wheel arrangements such as 4-6-0s.  Check out these good-looking 2-8-2s that are still around on the narrow-gauge East Broad Top in Pennsylvania (Sadly the road is currently not operational):

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1674559

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=78635

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=306775

No. 15, the newest of the trio, was built in 1914.  

These represent half of the narrow gauge operational roster when the road closed in 1956.  The other three engines, Nos. 16, 17, and 18, also 2-8-2s ( built in 1916, 1918, and 1920, respectively), are a good deal larger and were built with superheating, piston valves, and Southern valve gear.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2799490

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1911211
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 04:43:54 PM by J3a-614 » Logged
rogertra


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« Reply #110 on: October 17, 2015, 05:08:00 PM »

I don't get the idea that the 4-6-0 is too old-time looking. Not knowing the prototype I just checked the Ma & Pa version and the prototype was built in 1906 and retired in 1955. That covers the eras most steam-age modellers like to build.

Personally, the prototypes (both British and US) that would get me back into modelling date from the 1860s to 1910s.

I certainly didn't mean to imply that the 4-6-0 was too old-time-looking to be in service, only that it was so for my freelanced road, which I like to think of as up-to-date. 

Wayne

Wayne.

Same here.  Locos that looked like the 4-6-0, with the wedding cake steam dome and sandbox, slide valves, decorative woodwork cab etc.,  on the CPR or CNR disappeared or were rebuilt with "modern" fittings between the wars.  That's the look I will be trying to replicate, if and when I ever get around to rebuilding them.  Which is where the link to your previous posts will come in most handy.  I don't want to reinvent the wheel, I'm quite happy stealing other peoples ideas.  Smiley 

Cheers

Roger T.
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RAM

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« Reply #111 on: October 17, 2015, 09:04:21 PM »

There is an interesting story behind NN #40 and the passenger cars.   They had just been overhauled when passenger serve was ended.  The people that ran the railroad just loved them.  So when the big wheels were set to come and check on the mines, the railroad people would take the train and hide it.
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Pacific Northern


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« Reply #112 on: October 18, 2015, 07:36:45 PM »

I don't get the idea that the 4-6-0 is too old-time looking. Not knowing the prototype I just checked the Ma & Pa version and the prototype was built in 1906 and retired in 1955. That covers the eras most steam-age modellers like to build.

Personally, the prototypes (both British and US) that would get me back into modelling date from the 1860s to 1910s.

The two versions that Bachmann had of their 4-6-0 offered great diversity. The low driver versions with the small drivers gave it an old wild west type of appearance, while the larger driver version made it look like a much more modern steamer.
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Pacific Northern
electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #113 on: October 18, 2015, 08:46:01 PM »

To add some diversity to the mix:

Long about 8 years back, MR (I think) had a photo of a model someone had either built up or bought as it is.  It is a 2-4-4-2; in his case, it was lettered for (don't laugh...) the "Bicci&Orni Railway"  This would be a delightful loco to see offered, albeit probably a losing proposition...
...Of course, some weirdo (like me) would be so inclined to pursue this...

Rich C.
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Trainman203

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« Reply #114 on: October 18, 2015, 09:20:22 PM »

To me both Bachmann 4-6-0's are over the top beyond cool Dixie short line engines appropriate until the mid 60's.  I wouldn't mind seeing a model of a Missouri Pacific TW-63 ten wheeler, not a whole lot different from  Wayne's beautiful rebuilds.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #115 on: October 18, 2015, 09:41:56 PM »

I'm with Rich on a 2-4-4-2. I think one would fit my shortline layout nicely.



Sid
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Ken Clark

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« Reply #116 on: October 19, 2015, 12:04:41 AM »



   Sid

  I Have a AKANE  2-4-4-2 in Brass, even at over 40 years old, still running if somewhat
 noisey. Still a sweet running engine. Time for a grease and lube job.

   Ken C
    GWN
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Rashputin

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« Reply #117 on: October 19, 2015, 03:36:36 AM »

IMHo, Bachmann is missing a good thing if they don't make come out with NYC L2 series Mohawks (4-8-2, aka Mountains everywhere except on NYC which had more than anyone else) and an H10 2-8-2. Neither is available except in brass and the price of brass ones keeps climbing in spite of the fact that other than the rare stuff brass isn't selling all that well since it doesn't run as well as new non-brass engines.

Look, Broadway already dominates the Pennsy crowd by having produced so far, the Q2, T1, M1, I1, K4, J1, L1, S2, and H10. That pretty well sews up the Pennsy market and someone could work with the NYCHS to get the important things right to do the same for the NYC which has more fans than most people thiink. A good H10 Mike and the L2 series Mohawks are both basically new boilers and details for running gear Bachmann already has. If they're accurate enough and run as well as the other newer Bachmann engines I think they'd sell very, very, well for a long time (I'd sell a kidney and most of my other engines on Ebay to get a half dozen L2s and at least that many H10s).

Then there are the NYC Pacifics which, while not as famous as the Hudsons, seem to be popular but aren't available in anything but poorly operating brass (that I know of at least) and which could use the Bachmann K4 running gear and not compete with BLI periodically running their K4.

Well that's my .02 cents, again. Why no one makes the most common type of 4-8-2 used in the US which is the L2 series Mohawk I just don't know. Just about everyone likes them and their front end plumbing and those who don't do like the late models like the L2d which had a sunken Elesco like a J3 Hudson. Speaking of which, Bachmann could do a lot worse than running a J3a which is not the same as the J1 Hudsons BLI does. Alas, NYC people are out in the cold, really, unless they want a herd of elephant ears and plan on doing without the Mikes and Mohawks that were really the most common engines on the NYC.

Then again, maybe Bachmann doesn't want to make anything that road specific although after several runs of USRA Mikes I was amazed that Bachmann decided to pile more of them onto the market rather than doing something else. I dunno, we can always dream and hope Bachmann will come out with the C&O H7, D&RGW L-131, or maybe the SAL KB1 2-6-6-4. Small market items to be sure, but what the heck, at least there aren't a ton of them on the market already and being re-run every other year by someone else.

While I think of it, anyone know how well the Bachmann EM1 is selling ? That's a killer engine that runs well and I would think sells well. Bachmann stole a march on everyone else with that one.
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Skarloey Railway

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« Reply #118 on: October 19, 2015, 08:10:52 AM »


The one modeller of old-time locos who springs readily to mind for me is Harold Minky.  A google search should take you to some of his stuff if you're not already familiar with it. He does, in my opinion, some very fine work with what's available.

Wayne

Thanks, DR Wayne. Is Harold Minky the Pacific Coast modeller who like 1:55 scale?

And agreed, not much around for the modeller of early rail. Looking forward to reviews of B'mann's new 4-4-0
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Skarloey Railway

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« Reply #119 on: October 19, 2015, 08:17:11 AM »

So many having commented on the Backmann 4-6-0 looking older than they would like has finally gotten me to say a bit about that. . .

For the record, we've noted that the low-boiler, low driver vrsion is based on a Maryland & Pennsylvania prototype, and it wouldn't surprise me if the prototype was a stock engine and might have been build with a slightly different cylinder block and Stephenson valve gear.


#27 of the Ma & Pa was indeed built with Stephenson valve gear. http://www.maparailroadhist.org/locos/loco27.htm converted in 1922
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