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Author Topic: A Detailed 2-6-2  (Read 3176 times)
Dakota7820


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« on: January 16, 2016, 07:55:30 PM »

Hey Bachmann, how about producing an HO Spectrum 2-6-2 Prairie? True, you do already have a Prairie, but it's more geared toward the train set aspect of the hobby. You have some great looking Spectrum steamers available, and I believe you would have a lot of buyers for an equally detailed 2-6-2. Models of these little engines have been few and far between. Well detailed examples have been even rarer! There's a lot of modelers of small backwoods shortlines, logging railroads, and rural branch lines that would jump at the chance to add one to their roster. Many of the current products out there (from anyone) are models of bigger mainline locomotives, and just don't give the flavor of a small railroad that's "off the beaten path." A little Prairie would be just the ticket. Something similar to McCloud River No. 25 would be great. With no other competition to my knowledge, I think you would be highly successful. Just a thought!  Smiley
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Dakota Davidson
RAM

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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2016, 08:48:09 PM »

Bachmann's 2-6-2 is just a 0-6-0  with add on wheels.   i vote for Santa Fe 1800, or 1000-1100 2-6-2 with the 69 inch drivers.  They were used in all types of service up until the end of steam.
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Dakota7820


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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2016, 09:23:22 PM »

Those were neat locomotives as well RAM. I think it's interesting that they were used so widely on the Santa Fe, yet were so uncommon on most other Class 1 railroads. Makes you wonder why other roads didn't try the same
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Dakota Davidson
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2016, 09:48:27 PM »

We happen to have a 2-6-2 in running order in our fair city.

http://www.ftedmontonpark.com/train-locomotive-107.html

Sid

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Dakota7820


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« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2016, 11:10:04 PM »

Very nice example! There hasn't been a train whistle (or horn) in our small town since the mid 50's. But there is still a surviving 4-6-0 from the Paris & Mt. Pleasant Railway that used to run through here. It was originally built as Texas & Pacific 316, and later sold to the P&MP. It still operates on the Texas State Railroad today. I hear Bachmann plans to offer a model of it.

http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?road_number=TP%20316

http://shop.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=6192
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Dakota Davidson
Trainman203

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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2016, 10:39:57 AM »

That 2-6-2 with a fake diamond stack is a modern catalog 2-6-2 very similar to those on the Reader (not "Reading") Railroad.

 http://condrenrails.com/Reader/index.html

CB&Q and  Northern Pacific had numbers of large mainline Prairies, but they are an uncommon type in general.  Although Bachmann has made models of obscure engines before, such as the mogul from a short class I road I'd never heard of before. 
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
RAM

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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2016, 12:49:25 AM »

The Reader had a nice operation.  I found two RRs that I did not know that they had 2-6-2s, Chicago Great western, and the Walbash.  The reason that they lasted so long on the Santa Fe was their modest weight & good speed and their ability to operate well in reverse made them valuable for branch lines.  The 1800s could not operate on many of the branch lines.  An 1800 was the last steam locomotive that I saw in my home town.  It replaced an Alco rs? for a week or two.  1952 is history.  2016, no need for a local.  No rail customers, no sidings, so the trains don't stop in town any more.
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Len

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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2016, 02:48:27 AM »

It's, "Deja vu all over again."

I've been asking for a detailed small 2-6-2 for years. Usually getting slammed with comments to the effect, "Santa Fe's the only road that really used them.". Or, "They weren't that popular, we need a (whatever) instead."

Personally, I think a good quality 2-6-2 would sell very well. For one thing, unlike most big stream, they don't look rediculous on an 18" radius curve. Even if it was only done in Santa Fe and a painted/unlettered I think it would do weel. Santa Fe is a popular road, and a painted unlettered gives everyone else an easy way to get something going for the "Possum Trot Line" in their own back woods.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
on30gn15


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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2016, 03:02:54 AM »

There is this,
Quote
In 1885 six locomotives with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement were built by Baldwin for New Zealand Railways. In October 1898 Baldwin built a 2-6-2 for the McCloud River Railroad. In 1900 Brooks built several of this type Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. They were planned to be used on the mid-western prairies. However, they did not find favor with the Class I railroads. Only 1500 Prairies were built with many of them destined for short lines.
Railroads that used 2-6-2 "Prairie" locomotives in the USA (data provided by Steve Llanso of Sweat House Media)
http://steamlocomotive.com/prairie/
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When all esle fials, go run trains
Screw the Rivets, I'm building for Atmosphere!
later, Forrest
J3a-614

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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2016, 12:26:17 PM »

If I were in charge of product development at Bachmann and I wanted to consider a 2-6-2, I would go in for a stock logging engine of the type, similar to the operating example cited above.  I would consider basing it around the former 0-6-0 saddle tank engine Bachmann used to make, which as I recall had small 44-inch drivers.  That and 48-inchers were common sizes on stock rod loggers of a variety of wheel arrangements.  Overall size would be comparable to the low-drivered 4-6-0, or maybe somewhat smaller. 

Oh, and there were tank versions of such engines as well. 

There were also logging 2-8-2s that were essentially similar, although most were also a bit fatter than their 2-6-2 counterparts.
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Dakota7820


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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2016, 12:53:32 PM »

Thanks for the comments and info, guys. Lots of great ideas here. I enjoy seeing everyone's thoughts on what a good design would be. Keep em coming!
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Dakota Davidson
Trainman203

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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2016, 05:16:20 PM »

I've been asking for a Reader RR type catalogue light 2-6-2 for years too.

The old Roundhouse die cast SP 0-6-0 made a pretty easy conversion to one.

https://www.google.com/search?sclient=tablet-gws&site=&source=hp&q=roundhouse+0-6-0&oq=roundhouse+0-6-0&gs_l=tablet-gws.3..0j0i22i30l2.2965.9649.0.10871.16.11.0.5.5.0.471.2177.0j3j3j0j2.8.0....0...1c.1.64.tablet-gws..3.13.2205.wMt1jyVZw_Y

Maybe the Bach Man could make a nice contemporary version of that 0-6-0 and offer a 2-6-2 conversion kit.

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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Dakota7820


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« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2016, 07:01:28 PM »

I think that would really be ideal to release a new 0-6-0 with a conversion kit for a 2-6-2, Trainman203. Bachmann would be "killing two birds with one stone." Freelancers would have the option of two different locomotives, yet they would have the same familiar "home road" look if you wanted both. I like this idea.

As for the old Roundhouse 0-6-0, I wasn't familiar with it. But after looking them up and seeing a couple that were converted/detailed/weathered, they don't look bad at all in my opinion. One would definitely make a good stand in until someone finally offers one. I'm sure finding one would be no easy task.....

I have the cheap Bachmann "2-6-2" in storage that I had on my first layout. I've considered trying to dress it up a little....
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Dakota Davidson
nde1945

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« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2016, 01:42:24 AM »

Good idea!  Hope Bachmann agrees and puts it on the market.
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Pacific Northern


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« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2016, 01:35:53 AM »

I now the ATST, Northern Pacific and Southern Pacific all has 2-6-2 engines as I have models of each. These were mid size engines, the GN also had a 2-6-2 and it was a somewhat larger engine.  While these engines are really too large to pass for logging engines the Baldwin catalogue shows a couple of smaller 2-6-2 engines available for logging or mining uses.  A few plantation engines were 2-6-2's as well.

I myself would consider either the larger road engine variety or the much smaller 2-6-2 specialty engines,
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Pacific Northern
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