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Author Topic: New to G  (Read 5141 times)
u3o8geo

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« on: June 11, 2016, 12:07:32 PM »

I am new to G-scale, as I was given a Big Hauler Tweetsie set [looks like it has the version 5 frame]. A couple of questions - As part of the package that was given was some Aristo Craft brass track and the Bachmann steel track was not included. It looks that the rail height of the brass track is 0.35 mm, so I assume that it is not code 250?

Secondly, what should I consider as a replacement power supply [I do have the one that came with the set]; I do not plan to run multiple locos with the layout I am planning to build?

Finally, as this is 1:22.5 I assume I will need to scratch-build structures [?] so is there a 1:22.5 scale rule?

Thanks for any help that might be offered!

Regards,

TED
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Chuck N

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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2016, 12:38:35 PM »

Ted

I doubt your track is 0.33mm.  If it is AristoCraft it is most likely code 332 (0.332" tall, just the rail). That size rail is made by several different manufacturers, USATRAINS, LGB, Piko, Train-Li, and Bachmann.  They are all interchangeable.  There are different tie spacings.  The Bachmann steel track is fine for indoors, but it will rust very quickly outside.

What is the diameter of a circle made with your curved track?  If it is 4', I'd recommend going to a larger diameter curves.  4' diameter is fine for occasional use, like under a Christmas tree, but for regular use on a layout it puts a lot of stress and wear on the wheels, gears and motor.

Most, if not all plastic building kits, Pola and Piko, are 1:22.5.

Chuck
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JerryB

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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2016, 12:54:43 PM »

I question your stated ".35mm" dimension. That would make the rail height only 0.014" tall. That is tiny!

Rail 'code' is the rail height in decimal inches with the decimal point removed. Examples:

Code 250 is .250" (1/4" or 6.35mm) rail height
Code 332 is .332" (a little over 5/16" or 8.43mm) rail height

Those are the most common rail sizes used in large scale, with the 332 track usually included in sets.

Your set power supply will get you started. As to replacing it, first decide what combination of power and control you want. Examples are conventional track power, battery power with R/C, DCC, etc. Those decisions will point you to the type of power supply you will need.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
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Sequoia Pacific RR in 1:20 / 70.6mm
Boonville Light & Power Co. in 1:20 / 45mm
Navarro Engineering & Construction Co. in 1:20 / 32mm
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u3o8geo

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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2016, 01:33:04 PM »

Jerry and Chuck -

Thanks for your quick replies! Yes, I made the assumption that my caliper was metric rather than imperial [which it is], therefore the rail height is 0.33X inches, and not mm.

As you note, the diameter of the Aristo Craft track is 4 feet [yup, my tape is imperial] and  I thought the curves looked a bit tight [I also model in HOn3 and am a bit sensitive to tight radii].

Thanks again!

TED
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Chuck N

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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2016, 03:13:12 PM »

Ted

A lot of 1:22.5 rolling stock is closer to 1:24.  If you are going to scratch build buildings, it is easier to use 1:24 as it is half inch to the foot.  No scale ruler is needed.  On my outdoor layout, in Virginia, all the buildings are Pola or Piko.  I run 1:20.3, 1:22.5/24 and 1:29 scale trains.  The coaling tower, water tower, signal tower, and station are the only trackside structures.  All three scales look fine with the buildings.  In "G" gauge most of us use the 10 foot rule.  If it looks good from 10' away, it looks fine.

On my winter layout in Arizona I run exclusively 1:22.5/24.  There is a mixture of Pola, Piko, and wooden bird houses and other structurers that looked appropriate.  When looking at buildings for train I measure the height of the front door.  If it between 3 and 3 1/2 inches tall it will work.  Keep your eyes out.  We we got a jail and a general store in a trading post in Winslow, Arizona and a cool Navajo hogan at a trading post in Saunders, Arizona.  The latter three are wood and I wouldn't leave the out where they could get wet.  They were all less than$50.  That is a lot less than a kit.

Are you planning an indoor or outdoor layout?

Chuck

Here are some pictures of my Virginia layout.

1:29 train passing a 1:22.5 Pola station with pola water tank, coaling station and engine house in the background.



here are three Bachmann 1:20.3 engines in front of the Pola station, right to left, K-27, Connie (2-8-0) and Shay.



An LGB train, 1:22.5/24.








« Last Edit: June 11, 2016, 03:42:26 PM by Chuck N » Logged
Chuck N

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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2016, 03:44:41 PM »

Looks as if I exceeded my limit in the previous post.  Here are a couple more.

Now a couple of picture from our Arizona layout,with a mixture of buildings.

The Hogan



a picture of the jail before taking it to Arizona


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Hunt
?
MBB


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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2016, 04:48:43 PM »

Ted,

Click Here for online SCALE CONVERSION CALCULATOR

Click Here for a source of scale rulers.
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u3o8geo

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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2016, 05:13:47 PM »

Thanks to all who have responded to my not so smart questions! Living near Reno Nevada I think that I am going to do an outdoor layout, especially as we have some interesting space in a moderate-sized walled-in front courtyard.

Thanks again!

TED
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Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


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« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2016, 06:04:18 PM »

Ted,

Your Tweetsie Set was introduced in 1999, and was one of the first sets with the Version 5 chassis.  If your new layout will be small, and you will run only the one locomotive, the set power supply will be fine, especially if grades will be minimal and you don,t pull many more cars that came in the set.  If Reno has high temperatures, 90's 100's then don't keep out buildings with plastic roofs or train cars with dark roofs or they might soften and warp.  If i run a lot in high heat I also lube my locomotives every six weeks or so.

I too agree that 1/24th scale buildings, vehicles, and people work well with your set.  If you try something, and it looks good to you then don't worry about what someone else might think.

Have fun!

Loco Bill
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Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
Joe Zullo

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« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2016, 08:28:54 PM »

u3o8geo,

Just to be clear, "G" is the gauge of the track (45 mm), not the scale of the trains that run on that track. There are 5 or more scales that run on G gauge track.

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Chuck N

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« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2016, 09:44:22 PM »

Ted

In your original post you also asked about powering your railroad.  There are several options, as said by Jerry.  In my opinion there is no single system that is best in all situations.

I built my first garden railroad in the early 1980s in Lakewood, Colorado.  I had two loops that were separated by about 2 feet in elevation.  They were connected by a cog railroad.  I ran all three independently on track power.  I have been using track power ever since.  I only run one train at a time on a single mainline.  Here in Virginia I have a single mainline and in front of the station are the mainline and two through passing sidings.  I can have three trains out, but can only run one at a time, still using analog DC track power. For me that is fine.  If you look at the picture of the stream liner with the GG1 you will see about 1/3 of my layout.  The picture of the 3 Bachmann engines shows the mainline and the two passing sidings.

If I wanted to run two or more trains on the mainline at the same time, or I wanted to use all the sounds available, I would have to go to DCC.   For me I don't see any advantage to go to DCC.  

I have several engines with battery and RC.  I run them on the home layout, but their main purpose is to run trains on other layouts that don't have track power.

As to power supplies, the one that came with your set will pull your train and not much more.  Any grades or more cars, smoke, sound, will add to the current drain.  That power supply is about 1 amp at best.  Think about what type of trains you will be running in the future.  I figure about one amp per motor in the engine.  Some engines have 2 motors and some have 4.  Lighted cars pull current.  My USAT streamliners each pull about 1/2 amp.  The streamliner in the picture is probably pulling about 10 amps.  Is it better to buy a 10 or 15 amp power supply now and be covered for the future, or buy a smaller one and then get the larger one when you expand to bigger engines and trains?  

My recommendation is to start with track power and see where you want to go.  Also join a local club and pick their brains.  Go to open houses and ask questions.  One on One with people using the various power options will help you come to a decision.  Just take your time.  

Chuck

I have remote control of my train.  I'm using a Meanwell 24volt/15amp power supply and a Bridgewerks, Ur-15 controller between the power supply and the track.  G-Scale Graphics has a similar remote controller.  I don't have one, but I have heard good things about it.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2016, 10:53:52 AM by Chuck N » Logged
Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2016, 10:24:15 AM »

Ted,

As for the power supply, the most important factor is safety, be sure to use a ground fault protected outlet.

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Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
brad g

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« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2016, 01:32:49 AM »

Hmmm.
I'd like to jump in here with a question.
So if I want a bigger layout for my Big Hauler, I should be able to just switch out the stock power supply with a CW-80 80 watt power supply, which is about 5 amps, and that ought to work fine. 
Yes?
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Yardmaster
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« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2016, 10:10:31 AM »

If you are talking about a Lionel CW80 pack - no it will not work. O gauge trains run on AC not DC.
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Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


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« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2016, 11:29:19 AM »

Brad,

Any good 5 AMP "DC"  power pack will be fine for an expanded layout and will provide enough output for doubleheading if you would want to.  As I mentioned earlier, be sure to be safe!

Loco Bill
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Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
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