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November 17, 2017, 03:26:19 PM
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| | |-+  How about adding a 2-6-0. an 8-18d 2-6-0
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Author Topic: How about adding a 2-6-0. an 8-18d 2-6-0  (Read 12742 times)
ScottyB

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« Reply #30 on: August 13, 2017, 10:09:27 AM »

The shay was the "WOW!" locomotive that really sparked interest in On30. The Climax that followed had the same result.

The locomotives that followed are all gorgeous and run wonderfully, but lack that WOW! effect that the shay and climax had. I really think that if Bachmann came out with something being suggested in this thread, it might reignite interest in the scale. Even just re-running the shay for those late to the party that couldn't get one would be a great shot for On30.

As far as freight cars, all Bachmann cars are roughly based on the same tooling. I'd love to see them produce "shake the box" kits with the parts available. It's a kitbashers scale and I think that would be a big hit.

That said, I don't expect any new locos for On30 that aren't based on already existing tooling. I think 3D printing is the future.

Scott
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Trainman203

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« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2017, 10:05:43 AM »

Please excuse my lack of knowledge.

What does 8-18d mean?
« Last Edit: September 02, 2017, 05:54:23 PM by Trainman203 » Logged

Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
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MBB


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« Reply #32 on: September 02, 2017, 08:26:11 PM »

Please excuse my lack of knowledge.

What does 8-18d mean?

Baldwin Locomotive Works
Class of Locomotive  Designation
   8  -- Number of wheels under locomotive
   16 --Diameter of cylinders
   D  -- Indicates 6 wheels are connected as driving wheels

Class 8-16 D is one class of Baldwin Locomotive Works Narrow Gauge Freight Locomotive designs

 
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MBB


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« Reply #33 on: September 02, 2017, 09:14:50 PM »

Correct typo from 8-16 D to 8-18 D in quote

Please excuse my lack of knowledge.

What does 8-18d mean?

Baldwin Locomotive Works
Class of Locomotive  Designation
   8  -- Number of wheels under locomotive
  18 -- Diameter of cylinders
   D  -- Indicates 6 wheels are connected as driving wheels

Class 8-18 D is one class of Baldwin Locomotive Works Narrow Gauge Freight Locomotive designs

 




Clarification: The number after the hyphen designates the cylinder diameter,  it is not the diameter.
examples:
  16 designates cylinders 11 inches in diameter
  18 designates cylinders 12 inches in diameter


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Trainman203

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« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2017, 11:05:01 AM »

I've been reading about steam locomotives since the 1950s and have never heard that nomenclature before.  Did other builders use it too?  Or is it a catalog shorthand that went out of use with early woodburners?  

This nomenclature could not have been used on compound locomotives with high- and low-pressure cylinders, including the early compound Mallets.  It could not have been used with 3 cylinder locomotives. All of these were fashionable motive power concepts in the very early 20th century. If someone has examples of this system describing these locomotives I'd like to see it.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 11:15:00 AM by Trainman203 » Logged

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hminky

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« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2017, 12:16:22 PM »

Those are standard Baldwin catalog designations:





Harold
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 12:19:12 PM by hminky » Logged
Trainman203

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« Reply #36 on: September 03, 2017, 05:10:12 PM »

Now THAT is cool 😎.  Thanks.  I've seen those catalogue pages plenty but never paid much attention to those codes.  Did other builders use those definitions in their catalogues too?

Still waiting an example of a compound or a three-cylinder engine.

I love the railroad period represented by these catalog pictures, 1900 up to ww1 maybe.  You almost never see it represented on layouts.  Not much available enginewise and rolling stock wise.  In those days you see engine crews wearing white jump suits sometimes.  I've sometimes wondered how you could actually make a layout in black and white , the whole thing, to look like the photographs of the time.
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ebtnut

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« Reply #37 on: September 05, 2017, 11:22:54 AM »

Compounding for steam locos means using the steam twice before exhausing it.  After being used one in a cylinder stroke the steam still have a lot of energy left, but at a lower effective pressure.  It can be routed to another cylinder that has a larger diameter than the initial (high pressure) cylinder to compensate for the lower pressure.  If you look at pics of early articulateds, the front cylinders are much larger than the rear for this reason.  Using the steam twice increases the efficiency of the loco, resulting in better water and fuel usage.  With standard non-articulateds, there were two common methods of compounding - Cross compounds, where the cylinder on one side is larger than the other side; a Vauclain compound (named for the president of Baldwin in the turn of the century period) where on first look the cylinders look like they have two valves, when in fact one of them is the high pressure cylinder.  The development of the superheater spelled the end for most compounds, since the efficiency was achieved without all the extra machinery. 

Three-cylinder locos were developed in the 1920's mostly to give some extra boost.  They were not compounds - all cylinders received high-pressure steam.  They weren't overly popular in the U.S., probably more so in Europe.  The Southern Pacific had a fleet of 4-10-2 three-cylilnder locos.  The U.P.'s fleet of 4-12-2's were originally three-cylinder machines.  The third cylinder and valve were buried in the middle of the cylinder saddle.  The give-away was the Gresley valve gear mounted on the pilot deck.  The Baldwin 60,000 4-10-2 on display at the Franklin Institute in Phildadelphia is a three-cylinder loco.
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Dbarefoot

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« Reply #38 on: September 06, 2017, 08:33:57 AM »

Please folks. I made this thread for the 2-6-0. Let's try to keep on topic.

Rock On!
~Dusten
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Trainman203

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« Reply #39 on: September 06, 2017, 11:24:19 AM »

It's still about the 2-6-0 and the catalog designation used in the title.
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