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November 19, 2017, 11:44:58 PM
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Author Topic: Converting Ho Layout To N Scale.  (Read 1052 times)
Nightwing

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« on: April 18, 2017, 11:00:19 AM »

I just picked up a Bachmann N scale train set. I would like to duplicate my HO layout in N scale. My HO layout uses 15", 18" and 22" radius curves. N scale track is available in 11 1/4", 12 1/2", 14", 15 1/2", 17 1/2" and 19" radius. Is there a chart that shows how to convert HO to N? I don't want to have to buy a bunch of track in each radius just to be able to pick and choose what fits.
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jonathan


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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2017, 11:25:21 AM »

My grandfather did something similar when he converted from HO to N.

At 160:1, N scale is not exactly half of HO (87:1)  It works out that N scale is 54.375% in comparison to HO sizes. This is why the radii look a little different.

So a 22" radius curve in HO is comparable to 11.25" radius in N.

I have never played with my grandfather's N scale stuff, but I think that's how he worked it out (decades ago of course).

Regards,

Jonathan
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Nightwing

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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2017, 11:55:30 AM »

That works for the 22" radius, but nothing for the 18" or 15".
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Len

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« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2017, 12:10:04 PM »

Bigger is better. If you have the room, why not use 11, 15, and 19 in radius curves? That will let you run just about anything.

Len
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Nightwing

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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2017, 12:50:33 PM »

Certainly if I bought a couple of packages of every radius track Bachmann makes, I could make it work.  I am trying to avoid having to go thru that expense when I might only need 1 or 2 pieces of a particular radius to connect everything.  The HO layout I built was from a plan that had every piece identified, so buying everything was easy with minimal extras.
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jonathan


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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2017, 01:00:30 PM »

Then wouldn't flex track be the most economical way?

Regards,

Jonathan
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Nightwing

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« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 01:40:17 PM »

Then wouldn't flex track be the most economical way?

Regards,

Jonathan

No, since I already have EZ-Track 12" radius and straight track in my 29X44 layout.  I want to stay with EZ-Track.
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ACY

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« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2017, 05:21:44 PM »

No, since I already have EZ-Track 12" radius and straight track in my 29X44 layout.  I want to stay with EZ-Track.
Just because you have some Bachmann EZ track doesn't mean you can't also use flex track. Just buy a bundle of flex track; it doesn't get any easier than that. You can make the curves whatever you want them to be and keep your existing track. It is really easy to use flex track in conjunction with any track with a built in roadbed. This way you don't have to buy a variety of EZ track and you can easily get whatever radius you desire.
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2017, 07:38:55 PM »

Given Jonathan's calculation of 54.375%. that means a comparable N radius to the HO 18" would be 9.7875" and for 15" radius, it would be 8.15635". Since Bachmann doesn't make those, you don't have many options.
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Nightwing

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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2017, 09:45:59 PM »

The problem I need to solve is this:

Two N scale straight tracks running parallel to each other. They are horizontal.  Lets call them top and bottom.

The bottom track has a 30° crossing that connects to the top track.  I need to know what radius track needs to be in the top rail to aim into the 30° crossing.  Also important is the length of the radius track; is it a full section, half section?

I tried to post a diagram of the layout but they seem to be out of storage space here.
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Warflight

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« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2017, 12:59:57 AM »

I'm using a free (and easy to use) program called SCARM to figure out my track, and layout, and it already has all of the Bachmann EZ track in the program to use.

I think that might be your best bet, if you're committed to using EZ Track, and need to judge radius... it even has a thing that after you set up your dream layout, it will list each piece of EZ track, including the Bachmann part number, to make it easier to order the track you need. (Oh, and I'm with you on the EZ Track... that's all I plan to use on my first HO layout... it's easy, and it's what I have been using until I can build my layout, because I can lay it anywhere, and run my trains!)

My suggestion would be to look at the EZ Track sizes in the program that are bigger than the 11" radius, and see what they have.

Oh, and here's a link to it, if you're interested: http://www.scarm.info/index.php

(I hope the link is okay to post here)
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Len

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« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2017, 02:02:42 AM »

Kato makes 6", 7", 8-9/16", 9-3/4", and 11" radius curves. With slight modifications, you could use the Kato Snap-TrackŪ Conversion Track to connect your on hand EZ-Track to the Kato curves.

Len
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dutchbuilder


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« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2017, 04:30:44 AM »

Have a look at the track design program Anyrail.
It is free upto 50 pieces of track.
It comes with an extensive track library and is very accurate.

Ton
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2017, 09:16:03 AM »

Dear All,

From a 2011 post of mine [modified here] concerning HO to N layout conversions:

. . [T]he geometries between the N and HO scale EZ-Track systems are not proportional. 

Granted, the main curves in [both scales] are 30 degrees.   

The main HO straight is 9".  The main HO curve radius is 18", which is twice (2.0 X) the length of the straight.

The main N straight is 5".  The main N curve radius is 11.25", which is  2.25 X the length of the straight.

Those proportions (2.0 and 2.25) would be the same if the geometries were proportional.   

I don't know if the N "Remote" turnout has an offset proportional to the 1.5" offset of the HO "Remote" turnout[, or if the numbered turnouts are

dimensionally proportional.] 

I suggest that [you] download the Anyrail.com CAD layout program and

try putting [the layout] together using [proportionally close] pieces in [Anyrail's Bachmann N E-Z Track library. 

Fitter pieces will help make up the difference.]

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik
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Joe Satnik


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« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2017, 03:57:43 PM »

Dear All,

Another problem layout builders run into is that many of the old published layout books use Atlas HO Snap-Track switches

(turnouts without built-in plastic road bed) configured to only turn 20 degrees,

while you must turn the full 30 degrees on the divergent route if you use E-Z Track switches (turnouts).

Your best bet is to put it all together on Anyrail CAD track laying software.

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Joe Satnik 
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