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| | |-+  gear sets for old HO Trains.
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Author Topic: gear sets for old HO Trains.  (Read 722 times)
yellowbird

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« on: August 14, 2017, 04:31:22 PM »

Have a couple of old F7 Diesels which need gears sets. Trains were purchased in 1960-1970 time frame. Can anyone help?
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Len

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« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2017, 07:55:44 PM »

You could try Northwest Short Line. Their On-Line Shopping web page is: http://shop.osorail.com/

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Trainman203

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« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2017, 12:57:01 PM »

Trains that old are hardly ever worth fooling with.  They are operationally and cosmetically inferior in every way.  Plus, mechanisms that old are almost always completely oxidized electrically and congealed lubrication-wise.  Unless you have an overriding sentimental attachment, get new equipment.y
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
Bill Baker

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« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2017, 12:38:20 PM »

Len,

Thanks for the posting for Northwest Short Lines.  I went to their site and found that the only gear size the showed had gear teeth that were much too wide. 

Now for my problem:  I have a metal (not brass) engine that I bought at a train swap.  Poor ole dumb me forgot to get the manufactures name from the seller.  The teeth on my gear is metal, but I don't know how to size it nor do I know how to measure the diameter of the axle  or the number of gear teeth. (I cant reach it with my calipers).

So, with my limited description do you have any further ideas how I could locate a replacement or should I just park it on a side track and forget I ever had it?

Thanks for your many posts in the past....I've found them quite useful.

Bill
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Bill
RAM

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« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2017, 02:20:43 PM »

Is it cast metal?
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Len

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« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2017, 03:49:29 PM »

The number of teeth is fairly simple to count. Use a marker on one tooth, then spin the motor by hand to make the gear rotate. Count the number of teeth until the mark comes around again.

If the bottom of the power truck comes off, you should be able to access the axles to get a diameter measurement.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
Bill Baker

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« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2017, 04:46:08 PM »

Ram,
Yes, it is cast metal.

Len,
Great ideas!  I'll give it a try next week if I don't go blind after watching the eclipse Roll Eyes
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Bill
Len

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« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2017, 05:20:44 PM »

Len,
Great ideas!  I'll give it a try next week if I don't go blind after watching the eclipse Roll Eyes

Safest way I know to look at an eclipse is not to look at it at all. Take a piece of cereal box, or something similar, and poke a pin hole in it. Hold it a bit above the sidewalk, with one side towards the sun, and move it around until you get a bright circle of sunlight on the sidewalk. As the moon goes by, you'll see it blot out the bright spot on the sidewalk.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
RAM

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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2017, 11:30:06 PM »

I am going to make a guess at what you have.  It is a Cary body mounted on either an Athern, or Hobbytown main frame.
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