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Author Topic: Announced New Mallet Question?  (Read 17331 times)
Steve Stockham


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« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2008, 08:12:26 AM »

Hmmm.... looks like a cross between one of those old Spectrum 2-4-2T Coal crek #3 , the Spectrum 1:20.3 Porter and an Indie! (Not a bad idea....)
« Last Edit: July 17, 2008, 08:14:19 AM by Steve Stockham » Logged
Hamish K

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« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2008, 08:51:49 AM »

Vic

What is that locomotive ?

Hamish
[]

Thanks  Cheesy


How about one of these instead?

Oh Mr B
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Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2008, 09:10:13 AM »

Uintah Railway 21, stored at Atchee, Colorado. Nos. 20 and 21 were 0-6-2T locomotives built by Baldwin for the Uintah.  They were passenger power for this road.  Passenger trains on the Uintah were a single combination coach / baggage car, with the US mail handled in locked pouches in the baggage end of the car.  The little tanks could negotiate the 66 degree curves on Baxter pass, and could just pull the single car up the 7% grade.  Both were retired after the Baldwin 2-6-6-2s 50 and 51 took over from Shays on Baxter Pass, and the curves were widened to a mere 60 degrees.  At that point the freight train became a mixed, with the combination car on the back, so the passenger power was no longer needed.   

On the few occasions when longer passenger trains operated (one was a troop movement) the trains were handled by Shays on Baxter Pass. 

Charlie Mutschler
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Jon D. Miller

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« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2008, 09:20:14 AM »

As Charlie states it's a URY Baldwin.

For those that have access, both #20 and #21 are pictured on pages 50 and 51 of Henry E. Bender, Jr's book Uintah Railway The Gilsonite Route.  There are additional photos of these little engines at work throughout the book.

A Bachmann model of these little 0-6-2T locomotives would be a good addition to many narrow gauge rosters.

JD

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Poster Child (unofficial & uncompensated)
vic


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« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2008, 11:10:31 AM »

If I remember right, Bender's book also has line drawings of this, al all, Unitahs locomotives...and yes, between the Lyn and the Indy I think Bmann could make a nice model of this one.
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Tom Lapointe


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« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2008, 08:44:11 PM »

"Guess I missed that whole "Radius vs Diameter" notation...dam, it'd sure be nice to have one of these on my layout but Kevins was right the first time, Sorry Kev, sorry guys.

5' RADIUS means 10 foot diameter, so even if they make it 8 foot diameter thats still tighter than proto.. So I guess theres less than zero chance this will be anywhere remotely R1 capable...POOH!"


Vic, one way you could get around the R1 issue is to do a switching layout, using wide radius switches. Smiley A Mallet might seem a bit extreme Shocked as a switcher, but you could always say you're switching carloads of iron or lead ore (or maybe even depleted uranium!  Cheesy ) that requires a loco with LOTS of tractive effort!   Wink Grin               

Looking forward to getting one of these myself! Cool   (Mr. B., will it be out in time for Christmas Huh? ). Wink                                           Tom
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Hamish K

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« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2008, 03:32:47 AM »

Thanks to Charles and the others who replied to my question on Unitah 21. Much appreciated.

Hamish
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andyb

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« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2008, 06:40:52 PM »

I love the 2-6-2 saddle tank prairie! I wonder if anyone would actually chop a mallet up tho....  Shocked

While we're suggesting possible variations, how about something slightly bigger....



(just a bit of fun of course - R1? maybe not... Wink )

andyb
« Last Edit: July 18, 2008, 06:44:39 PM by andyb » Logged
Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2008, 09:04:09 PM »

Hamish, you are most welcome.  Anyone interested in the Uintah will find a good bit of material has been published.  Henry E. Bender's _Uintah Railway:  The Gilsonite Route_ is the basic must-have history of the URY.  This book has been re-printed, and I haven't looked at the reprint to see if more material has been added.  However, the original volume has mechanical specs for the locos, including copies of Baldwin erecting cards for some, including the 0-6-2T's.  Scale drawings of Shay No.1, 2-6-6-2T No. 51, flat, box and stock cars as well as combine No. 50 in its rebuilt form.  This is as the car now exists at the Colorado Railroad Museum, awaiting restoration. 

Roger Polley's two volume _Uintah Railway Pictorial_ is well worth having if you are a URY enthusiast.  Many images, reprints of maps, etc. that are not in Bender's book.  Polley has minimal text, many, many photos.  Bender has a good history, many fewer photos. 

Then there is a movie of the URY with the articulateds at work which was issued by Machines of Iron.  Very interesting. 

Uintah 20 and 21 had 13 x 18 inch cylinders, 34 inch drivers, 24 inch trailing truck wheels; weight slightly over 34 tons in working order, and had a tractive effort of 13,680 pounds.  The tender bunker held 1.5 short tons (3,000 pounds) of soft coal, and the side tanks 970 US gallons of water.  Sufficient to handle one car on the 7.5% grades on Baxter Pass.  Photos show two-car passenger trains with a Shay helper, or just the Shay as motive power on the pass. 

Happy modeling. 
Charlie
-30-
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Spule 4

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« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2008, 11:46:40 PM »


A Bachmann model of these little 0-6-2T locomotives would be a good addition to many narrow gauge rosters.

JD



There are a slew of nice Baldwin 3' gauge prototype fodder out there, hopefully we will see more......

While I have no (personal) interest in the mallet, I am sure it will be a good seller and looks very nice.
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Garrett
the Bach-man
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« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2008, 01:17:39 AM »

Dear All,
It appears that the new loco will run on R2 radius, and with a minor modification it will go around R1.  I want to see a production model before I detail the discussed modification, however.
Have fun!
the Bach-man
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vic


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« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2008, 05:48:39 PM »

Dear All,
It appears that the new loco will run on R2 radius, and with a minor modification it will go around R1.  I want to see a production model before I detail the discussed modification, however.
Have fun!
the Bach-man

 Grin Grin Grin Grin
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Frisco


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« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2008, 03:09:56 PM »

Hamish, you are most welcome.  Anyone interested in the Uintah will find a good bit of material has been published.  Henry E. Bender's _Uintah Railway:  The Gilsonite Route_ is the basic must-have history of the URY.  This book has been re-printed, and I haven't looked at the reprint to see if more material has been added.  However, the original volume has mechanical specs for the locos, including copies of Baldwin erecting cards for some, including the 0-6-2T's.  Scale drawings of Shay No.1, 2-6-6-2T No. 51, flat, box and stock cars as well as combine No. 50 in its rebuilt form.  This is as the car now exists at the Colorado Railroad Museum, awaiting restoration. 

Roger Polley's two volume _Uintah Railway Pictorial_ is well worth having if you are a URY enthusiast.  Many images, reprints of maps, etc. that are not in Bender's book.  Polley has minimal text, many, many photos.  Bender has a good history, many fewer photos. 

Then there is a movie of the URY with the articulateds at work which was issued by Machines of Iron.  Very interesting. 

Uintah 20 and 21 had 13 x 18 inch cylinders, 34 inch drivers, 24 inch trailing truck wheels; weight slightly over 34 tons in working order, and had a tractive effort of 13,680 pounds.  The tender bunker held 1.5 short tons (3,000 pounds) of soft coal, and the side tanks 970 US gallons of water.  Sufficient to handle one car on the 7.5% grades on Baxter Pass.  Photos show two-car passenger trains with a Shay helper, or just the Shay as motive power on the pass. 

Happy modeling. 
Charlie
-30-
                                                                                                                  The combine at the Colorado has as of June been restored at least for looks it is a very nice looking car.
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Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2008, 09:18:35 PM »

Interesting comparing the pre-production sample with John Lewis' drawings and photos of other narrow gauge articulates, both simples like the meter gauge 2-6-6-2s built for Rio Grande do Sol (Brazil) and mallets.  All of these prototype three foot and meter gauge locos have the dry pipes to the rear engine down below the running boards except for the Uintah's pair.  My thinking is that this feature was only used on the Uintah locomotives because it was needed to get adequate clearance so the front engine could swing far enough to negotiate the 60 degree curves. 

This looks like an interesting model, and one which was, again, much in demand among the commenting crowd on this and other sites.  I haven't decided if I want one of those or another mudhen. 

Cheers!
Charlie Mutschler
-30-
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