ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 20, 2018, 02:31:39 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  On30
| | |-+  Reasons for Bachmann to make a K-27
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] Print
Author Topic: Reasons for Bachmann to make a K-27  (Read 21940 times)
br549
Guest
« Reply #60 on: September 28, 2008, 06:33:41 PM »

I have been checking into the MMI K28 in 0n30. from what I have seen  I will be throwing in the towel asking B-mann to produce one.
Yes you bet your sweet  potatoes I will pay the price to own one and ease the hissy fits  of other members here that take offense to our asking  and make nasty remarks .
I would rather Bachmann get my $$$
Logged
br549
Guest
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2008, 07:20:04 PM »

Been searching for the lustrous K27, they are Shocked Cry  SOLD OUT on limited production and none found anywhere except on "greed bay" back to pestering Mr B
Logged
Tomcat

View Profile
« Reply #62 on: October 02, 2008, 01:36:11 PM »

Thatīs the point - A Bachmann K-27 would be always available, would be perfectly constructed and built + a fun to operate. This would actually pay back to the owner
and to us...

Kind regards, Tom Wink
Logged
James Thomas

View Profile
« Reply #63 on: October 02, 2008, 02:36:33 PM »

As I recall, Bachmann began producing properly sized large-scale rolling stock before producing the K-27.  I have a MMI K-28; the Bachmann rolling stock looks very small and out-of-place behind it.  I also can't run the K-28 on my railroad due to having only 22" curves.

I don't see Bachmann producing a product that is not compatible with Bachmann's other products.  The main advantage of Bachmann's On30 products is the ability to have O Scale in a relatively small space.  The K-27, K-28 and K-36 are really aimed at On3 people with more space.  (Same with San Juan rolling stock.)  Making these products available in On30 was an afterthought to increase sales.

I think Bachmann should stick to making products that fit with their base market.  Even producing locos that require 22" curves was difficult for many of us.  I was lucky to have enough space to convert from 18" to 22".

By the way, where is the sound version of last year's 4-4-0 that was supposed to follow a year later?

-James Thomas
Logged
Frisco


View Profile WWW
« Reply #64 on: October 02, 2008, 07:07:34 PM »



I don't see Bachmann producing a product that is not compatible with Bachmann's other products.  The main advantage of Bachmann's On30 products is the ability to have O Scale in a relatively small space.  The K-27, K-28 and K-36 are really aimed at On3 people with more space.  (Same with San Juan rolling stock.)  Making these products available in On30 was an afterthought to increase sales.
By the way, where is the sound version of last year's 4-4-0 that was supposed to follow a year later?

-James Thomas
While it may not be compatible with their products there are lots of companys that do make rolling stock for it. Also it does not seem imposible to me that they would come out with freight cars Colorado style.    As for the 4-4-0 with sound I would think it will etheir come out right before Christmas of else in the 2009 catalog.
Logged
Royce Wilson

View Profile
« Reply #65 on: October 02, 2008, 08:42:01 PM »

I once had a O scale 1880's era layout that I enjoyed very much. it was a shelf layout with a lot of switching...learned how to lay stub switchs very well!
Once knew a fella that had a O scale bigboy on a mantle, he just ran it back and forth. but he enjoyed that locomotive probably as much as some of you guys with basement size layouts. you can argue space till the cows come home. besides if large scale guys build indoor layouts then there you go. Wink

Royce Wilson
Logged
Frisco


View Profile WWW
« Reply #66 on: October 08, 2008, 12:38:04 AM »

Could you please explaine the what a stub switch is. Thanks
Logged
Chatzi473

View Profile WWW
« Reply #67 on: October 08, 2008, 01:52:05 AM »

a stub switch is where both rails move


Logged
Frisco


View Profile WWW
« Reply #68 on: October 08, 2008, 06:27:06 PM »

Thank you. What was the point of using this type of switch?
Logged
amdaylight

View Profile
« Reply #69 on: October 09, 2008, 11:48:57 AM »

When you have limited metal working tools and machining the points is not something that you can do in house, the other problem was that an iron rail that had been ground to a point could not support the weight of a train, it was not till that steel rail came into being that the strength was there for a point type switch. A stub switch can be built with one casting, the frog and a switch stand by the railroad with rail that they already have The stub switch was used mostly before 1900 and hung on in a few places much longer than that. The Colorado Narrow Gauges and the White Pass liked them because snow would not pack snow in between the point rail and the stock rail like a regular point switch will, so they were easier to keep maintained in the winter. The major problem with them was if you ran through the switch the wrong way the switch was set for the other track you were on the ground and had a mess to clean up.

Before the frog was invented they used to use something that looked like a staple that fitted in to sockets that lifted the diverging track over the main track. Like any thing else there was a lot of inventing and patents taken out on some good ideas and a whole lot of bad ideas. 

Andre Smiley
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!