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January 21, 2018, 12:48:48 AM
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Author Topic: Imperfections in flex track layout  (Read 141 times)
MatroxD

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« on: January 18, 2018, 08:10:20 PM »

I'm just wondering, as I'm new, if you have an imperfect joint using flex track, what do you use to fill and sand the void. I used solder, but I wondering if I could also use jb weld, as it also has steel in it? Just wondering..
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RAM

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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2018, 09:01:30 PM »

You say that you are new, and I think that is the problem, not the imperfection in the flex track layout.  May I ask what you are trying to do.  If we know that we will be able to help you solve your problem.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2018, 12:49:22 PM by RAM » Logged
MatroxD

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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2018, 05:10:11 AM »

Ok, the best way to describe it, is that there was a gap in the rail. The gap is where one piece of the flex track ended, and another began(where you actually place your rail joiner). I thought that I had cut enough for extra slack, but there is about 1/8 of an inch space between the two ends.

I originally used solder to fill it, then going behind, with my Drexel, and sanding. But it left a slight inperfection, and I have a bump when the train runs. The engine is fine (minus the bump of course), but my cars derail constantly. So I am wondering, if anyone else has run into this problem (I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one that has  made  this mistake), and what they used to fill in the void?

I actually did pretty good honestly, as I ran 10 pieces of flex track, making 3 "square" shaped ovals, and this one my one mistake(even though I still kick myself, as it only takes one mistake to cause an issue).

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Len

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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2018, 09:39:49 AM »

The simplest solution may be to cut both rails about 6" or so on either side of the bump. Then cut a new section to fill in the gap.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
MatroxD

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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2018, 11:12:51 AM »

Mnnnn, but how do I get the rails out, without destroying the cork? Lol, I'm really new to this...
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Len

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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2018, 11:24:48 AM »

When I've had to do this, I used a fine rail nipper on the rails and a fine tooth Zona saw on the tie strip. Then slide a 1" putty knife between the ties and cork to break it loose if you've glued it and lift the track section out.

Cut the new section to length, trim the 'spikes' on each end of the new section so you can slide the rail joiners completely on, and the existing track to make room for the joiners. Lay the new section in place, and slide the rail joiners over to connect the new section with the existing track. Solder the connections if you want, and ballast as you will.

Len
 
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
MatroxD

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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2018, 09:35:49 PM »

Thank you. I am going to try tomorrow and see how it goes..
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MatroxD

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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2018, 09:30:11 PM »

I actually took a hybrid approach. I simply replaced the individual rail sections. It was a lot easier than I thought. I was able to replace 2 sections and all is working well now..

Thank you everyone for the input and advice
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