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 71 
 on: May 18, 2018, 07:54:51 PM 
Started by JNLRET1 - Last post by Kevin Strong
Yes, the "DCC Ready" loco will run like your other traditional analog DC locos. What's happening with the DCC-equipped loco is that the decoder needs a certain voltage just to function. In many cases, this is in the neighborhood of 6 volts, but it may be more. Once the decoder gets this requisite voltage, it wakes up and creates a baseline zero voltage line to the motor. It does not all of a sudden feed that 6 volts to the motor. In the case of many decoders, once the decoder "wakes up," it feeds voltage to the motor in a more-or-less 1:1 relationship to the additional voltage going to the decoder. For instance, if you feed 7 volts to the decoder and the decoder needs 6 volts to function, it will feed 1 volt to the motor. 10 volts will send 4 volts to the motor, etc. The upshot is that with most decoders*, at any given track voltage, the DCC-equipped loco will run slower than a non-DCC-equipped loco.

The Climax has the plug-and-play socket in the tender, so if you want to run your loco on analog power, check to see if there's a "dummy plug" in the box that came with it. You can pull the decoder and replace it with the dummy plug to run your loco on regular DC. You will lose your sounds, though.

Later,

K

 72 
 on: May 18, 2018, 05:02:31 PM 
Started by gmhtrains - Last post by gmhtrains
Under which discussion board would Bachmann prefer commentary on specific SceneScape products to be addressed? The Plasticville USA category has so little activity that it could be renamed as "Plasticville USA and SceneScapes" without being a problem.

gmhtrains

 73 
 on: May 18, 2018, 04:22:51 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by Trainman203
Not asking for intense tutoring Sid.  No prob, no more questions.  The answers probably wouldnít translate well to lumber operations in my region anyway.

 74 
 on: May 18, 2018, 03:26:37 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by WoundedBear
As my ursine cousin Yogi would say.......

"I'm smarter than your average bear"

 Grin Wink

Sid

 75 
 on: May 18, 2018, 03:22:18 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by Terry Toenges
I never thought of turning one like that. 

 76 
 on: May 18, 2018, 03:09:33 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by WoundedBear
I canít stop thinking about turning equipment on a switch.  Would you do  that by pushing leading end A onto the straight track, carefully push end B onto the diverging track, then pull end A out again?  That would only work on a pretty long car and one whose trucks could very freely turn 180 Degrees, I would think.

You caught onto that one pretty quickly Wink

Sid

 77 
 on: May 18, 2018, 03:04:00 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by WoundedBear
You seem to have missed the part where I said "educate yourself"

I have no desire to become your tutor. I spent countless hours reading and researching and stumbled across some incredible things as I did.

I suggest you do the same if your interest is so piqued.

Sid

 78 
 on: May 18, 2018, 03:01:44 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by Trainman203
I canít stop thinking about turning equipment on a switch.  Would you do  that by pushing leading end A onto the straight track, carefully push end B onto the diverging track, then pull end A out again?  That would only work on a pretty long car and one whose trucks could very freely turn 180 Degrees, I would think.

 79 
 on: May 18, 2018, 02:31:26 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by Trainman203
Iím ready to learn. Even though we had a lot of logging roads down here in the piney woods and the cypress swamps, they  were long gone by the 30s pretty much.  The South of the US was clear cut out by the mid 20ís.  Mississippi looked more like Oklahoma until the trees finally began to grow back.  No conservation back then.  Erosion was a real problem afterwards for a pretty long time.. 

You seem to describe pretty big operations almost like a common carrier. Most of the one Iíve heard of down here were not nearly as involved.   Of course on bigger ones theres crew movements, work extras, but mail?  Never have heard of that on logging roads before.How did they do that? How do you turn equipment on a switch ?  Not sure what that means.  Not having a wye makes sense though, no room in hilly woods for one.

Do logging modelers turn the trucks when operating?  Iíve never heard operations on these roads described?   Thereís a lot of logging roads in the magazines but to me up to now they seemed to be the province of grade A plus proto modelers who focusesd on the very cool stuff on those pikes.

Tell more, my interest is up.

 80 
 on: May 18, 2018, 01:53:29 PM 
Started by Terry Toenges - Last post by WoundedBear
  One commodity traveling one way, thatís all there is. 

You need to educate yourself a bit more, if that's what you think.

Do you know how they turned long equipment on a switch instead of a wye? Do you know about the swiveling trucks underneath these long loads? That's just one example of what you are missing from an operational standpoint. Camp cars, box cars of supplies, crane cars........cable loads. It didn't all appear in the bush like magic. Crews need to be moved as well as mail. Empties need to be dispatched back to the point of origin also.

Don't be so quick to dismiss a whole branch of modelling.


Sid

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