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Author Topic: USRA 2-6-6-2 Review needed  (Read 17705 times)
SteamGene

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« Reply #30 on: May 31, 2007, 07:00:36 PM »

The Mantua 2-6-6-2 and the Spectrum USRA 2-6-6-2 are alike in two ways.  They are both steam locomotives and they are both articulated Mallets with 12 drivers. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
jsmvmd

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« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2007, 01:34:24 PM »

Dear Gene,

Too, you can get it with or without a tender.  Not too sure if I like the looks of the 2-6-6-2T.  Does not seem to be practical if long distances were involved, i.e. how much fuel could it hold?  Both are quite interesting designs.

Best Wishes,

Jack
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Pacific Northern


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« Reply #32 on: June 02, 2007, 02:23:06 PM »

There is a third option available assuming that all of the old Mantua engines have been re-released.

I have the "Rayonier" Mantua 2-6-6-2T engine which comes with a small oil tender.   Same basic engine as the other tank models, note the headlight is mounted high on the boiler and not low on the pilot.
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SteamGene

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« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2007, 04:40:58 PM »

Jack,
Tank locomotives were not meant to go long distances.  Most were switchers.  In the case of the Mantua 2-6-6-2T, it's a logging engine, so it, too, would be close to a water and fuel supply, Again, the Mantua articulated is not  a road engine, with or without a tender.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
jsmvmd

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« Reply #34 on: June 02, 2007, 09:27:41 PM »

Dear Gene and Dr,

Understood re tank engine usage.  I just got back some pictures from the Altoona Railroaders Museum including a saddle tank Porter, named  "Nancy."  Will post pix on my website if interested. Also, there are a 250 ton crane that is operational,  the "Mountain Air" passenger car from the Broadway Ltd., and Charles Schwab's personal coach, the "Loretto."

Best Wishes,

Jack
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Pacific Northern


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« Reply #35 on: June 03, 2007, 03:20:31 PM »

Jack,
Tank locomotives were not meant to go long distances.  Most were switchers.  In the case of the Mantua 2-6-6-2T, it's a logging engine, so it, too, would be close to a water and fuel supply, Again, the Mantua articulated is not  a road engine, with or without a tender.
Gene

You are still referring to the tank engine model and not the articulated engine with tender?
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SteamGene

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« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2007, 04:18:25 PM »

Both the 2-6-6-2 and the 2-6-6-2T are articulated.  If you put them side by side you will find they are the same size up to the rear of thecab.  They are both logging locos. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Pacific Northern


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« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2007, 05:57:29 PM »

I placed the units on my test track and agree they are similar in size, not much difference with the exception of dome placement and cab size.

However I would certainly not consider the version with the tender "not" a road engine.

Would that also mean the Spectrum 2-6-6-2 engines are also not to be considered road engines?
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SteamGene

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« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2007, 06:15:04 PM »

The USRA light Mallet was a road engine.  Compare it to the size of the Mantua and you will find it is larger.  Granted the light Mallet got assigned to branch lines as heavier power came available, but it was a road engine. 
IIRC, the Mantua's prototype was a three foot gauge engine that they modeled in standard gauge. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Pacific Northern


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« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2007, 06:48:22 PM »

I agree with the premise the proto type for the Mantua 2-6-6-2 was a narrow guage logging engine. 

However my point is that since the re-released units 2-6-6-2's are not narrow guage the units make a most interesting road engine. The GN 2-6-6-2 shown is not that large and engine. 

http://www.gngoat.org/gn_steam_14.jpg

I have the Rayonier 111 which is the tank unit and ancillary slope back tender.  http://loggingmallets.railfan.net/models/mantua/m-rayon111.jpg
this engine complements my logging railroad portion of my layout which also includes a couple of Shays and a Heisler.

For the mainline portion my main road engines are a couple of Spectrum 2-6-6-2's and a Mantua 2-6-6-2 in GN livery and the other steam being 2-8-0s, 4-6-0's

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r.cprmier

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« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2007, 08:39:17 PM »

Why wouldn't you consider a USRA 2-6-6-2 a road engine?  Wouldn'tthat sort of depend on what a road in question's needs were?
Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Pacific Northern


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« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2007, 08:50:27 PM »

 I consider the Spectrum USRA 2-6-6-2's and the Mantua 2-6-6-2 with tender road engines. The only engine I would not consider as a road engine would be the Mantua 2-6-6-2 tank (and variants)
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Atlantic Central

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« Reply #42 on: June 04, 2007, 07:15:27 PM »

doctorwayne,

Remove the steam dome, it just pulls streight up, remove the screw under it. The top half of the boiler will then lift off. The cab has a few simple snap points but should easily come off with the boiler.

I have three of these, had two at least partily apart. I would recommend getting the instructions before further disassembly.

I believe they may actually be available on the section of this web site, see the "product reference" tab at the top of the page.

Sheldon
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SteamGene

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« Reply #43 on: June 04, 2007, 08:33:38 PM »

Sheldon has the right instructions.  The rear sand dome hides the screw.  Use a small flat bladed screwdriver to lift the cab away and up. 
Slow and gentle does it.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Isambard

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« Reply #44 on: June 04, 2007, 10:53:59 PM »

The USRA light Mallet was a road engine.  Compare it to the size of the Mantua and you will find it is larger.  Granted the light Mallet got assigned to branch lines as heavier power came available, but it was a road engine. 
IIRC, the Mantua's prototype was a three foot gauge engine that they modeled in standard gauge. 
Gene

"Light" is a relative term when referring to the 2-6-6-2's. I believe that the Bachmann Spectrum is modelled after the C&O Class H6, of which the last 10 were built in 1949.   They weighed about 449,000 lbs and had a tractive effort of 77,900 in compound and 98,300 lbs in simple. From MR/Linn Wescott's Cyclopedia Vol 1 Steam Locomotives I understand that the H6's, whether 1920's or 1949's, were not a USRA design, unlike the C&O H5's. Can anyone comment?
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