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Author Topic: Civil War trains  (Read 12418 times)
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2011, 04:27:49 PM »

According to this article:
 http://ctr.trains.com/Railroad%20Reference/Steam%20Locomotives/2006/07/Steam%20locomotive%20profile%200-8-0.aspx
0-8-0's were built as late as 1953 and some were used in heavy transfer service (mainline operation between yards.)

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2011, 11:22:57 PM »

winans camels were 0-8-0s and they predated the civil war. they were extensively used by the b&o as mainline freight locomotives.....

btw, there is an article on railroads in the civil war in the latest issue of trains.....

My bashed 0-8-0.



Prototype circa 1855.

Made from



Another photo. Link & pin couplers.




Rich

Incredible work!
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BIG BEAR

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« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2011, 05:01:03 PM »

Hey Guys,

   I just picked up a copy of "Trains" Magazine - March 2011 issue sub Title on the magazine is "Civil War rails". I haven't read it yet, as I just bought it last night, but the photo of a 4-4-0 - American (My personal fave) on the front is Georgeous. I could stare at her all night long. Drool Drool - oops.

Barry
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Barry,

...all the Live long day... If she'd let me.
Doneldon

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« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2011, 10:20:58 PM »

Jim-

"Transfer service." My point exactly. These were short runs which used mainlines only when other access wasn't available. For example, many cities had specialized transfer railroads in order to avaiod fouling the mains with transfers.
                                                                 -- D
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jward


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« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2011, 07:57:45 AM »

those 0-8-0s built as late as 1953 were for the n&w. there weren't many cities along the original n&w where tranfer runs were needed. more likely, those 0-8-0s were used on mine branches where sharp curves precluded the use of larger power.

but as was stated before, b&o was using a rather large fleet of 0-8-0s in mainline service before the civil war.....
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
ebtnut

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« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2011, 08:08:55 PM »

Trying to tie the threads back together - Back in the Civil War era, a lot of freight engines were of the 0-6-0 or 0-8-0 wheel arrangement.  They had a lot more tractive effort than the ubiquitous 4-4-0's of the period.  Many of them were Baldwin's "Flexible Beam" design, an early form of lateral motion device to help negotiate curves better.  The B&O had large number of
0-8-0's, mostly Winans Camels as illustrated above. 

As the 19th Century closed the benefits of pilot trucks became more and more apparent as speeds increased.  In this period also the differentiation between passenger and freight power increased, as did the development of the switch engine as distinct from hand-me-down road engines. 

As a switcher, the 0-8-0 began to become common in the early 1900's.  The USRA loco designs included an 0-8-0 which was popular at the time, and in remained a favored design right up until the N&W built its last ones.  While the 0-6-0's and 0-8-0's were found almost exclusively in yard work, you might see them occasionlly out on the road doing local way freight work.  The Lacawanna frequently used some of their 0-8-0's in this service.
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richg
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« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2011, 08:38:35 PM »

The 0-8-0's during the middle 1800's were used for coal drags and work trains as railroads were continually expanding. There were quite a few various models of 0-8-0s A few did pusher service as some eastern roads had some steep grades at the time.
The B&O had most of the Winans Camels. Almost 200 from a couple sources.
I have a photo of the last one being dismantled in the B&O yard in 1898. The B&O kept a couple around the yard. Only two had boiler explosions.
The South during the war took many from B&O. They were dragged by large teams of oxen over dirt roads using some kind of dollies.

Rich
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BIG BEAR

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« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2011, 11:38:32 PM »

Here are some interestng items at Hawthorne Village trains for you to look at:

         http://www.bradfordexchange.com/products/917402_civil-war-train.html?N=8125+8107+9040+9044+564+9038+9037
 
   After reading the aticle in "Trains" it sounds like one should only consider 4-4-0 to stay true to what really happened.

                     or if you are into On30:
         
http://www.bradfordexchange.com/products/49073_civil-war-train.html 

Barry   
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Barry,

...all the Live long day... If she'd let me.
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2011, 02:42:39 PM »

Is it Bachmann that is producing the armor cars?
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Hamish K

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« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2011, 10:48:27 PM »

Bachmann used to produce a model of the "John Bull" locomotive (sold in a train set). While this is an earlier locomotive from the 1830s it lasted in regular service until 1866. Also Bachmann produce a Norris 4-2-0 (Pegasus), also from the 1830s. I don't whether any of these lasted until the civil war, but they did last into the late 1850s.

Hamish
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Hamish K

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« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2011, 11:07:54 PM »

I have now seen a reference that states that the "Pegasus" was retired in 1863, so perhaps it could be used for an early civil war train. Bachmann's other historic train type, the De Witt Clinton, apparently only lasted a short time so would not be suitable. While locomotives built during the civil war would be more modern than the "Pegasus" and the "John Bull" it seems that some of these early type s of locomotives did last into the civil war.

Hamish

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BillingsRR
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« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2011, 04:57:52 PM »

"To commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the start of the Civil War, Bachmann is offering HO Civil War train sets in two versions: Union and Confederate. The 130-piece Civil War sets also include military figures, cannons, and horses."

This is from Bachmann themselves. So I guess your wish came true!  Grin
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ebtnut

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« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2011, 06:11:37 PM »

We've been down this path before, but just to be brief - The very earliest locos were almost one-of-a-kind experiments.  Some came from England - the John Bull and the Sturbridge Lion, for instance.  They were of the 0-4-0 design, with the cylinders down under the smokebox.  The Tom Thumb on the B&O had a gear drive and a vertical boiler.  The Best Friend of Charleston also had a vertical boiler but was an 0-4-0. 

As the 1830's wore on, some common designs emerged.  Chief among them was the 4-2-0, of which "Pegasus" is a good example.  The B&O had a number of these.  The B&O Museum includes the "Lafayette", a reproduction built for the Fair of the Iron Horse in 1927.  It had been operating occasionally in past years. 

The 4-2-0 rather quickly morphed into the 4-4-0, which did dominate most of the 19th Century.  As I noted earlier, there were other locos, such as the Baldwiin Flexible Beam designs.  The 2-6-0 and 4-6-0 also became more common as the century wore on.  And yes, some of the early locos were kept around for light work or switching.  A 4-2-0 on a work train or short local train during the Civil War would be just fine.



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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2011, 12:22:04 PM »

"To commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the start of the Civil War, Bachmann is offering HO Civil War train sets in two versions: Union and Confederate. The 130-piece Civil War sets also include military figures, cannons, and horses."

This is from Bachmann themselves. So I guess your wish came true!  Grin

Wouldn't it be nice if the engines were Spectrum quality?
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Bluecoatscheesypoofs


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« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2011, 04:15:52 PM »

Hey dude. You are in luck! Bachmann JUST announced 2 civil war train sets. Union and Confederate. They did this to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the start of the civil war. Bachmann must have been listening to you. lol      If you don't believe me,   check the main page toy fair announcements
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