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Author Topic: New 4-4-0 in Pennsylvania  (Read 9690 times)
J3a-614

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« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2013, 08:35:35 PM »

Here's the website for the operation:

http://www.steamintohistory.com/

The line's Facebook page, with comments:

https://www.facebook.com/steamintohistory

They do have a couple of crabs there; one guy is upset at the smoke, another is worried about the trains running alongside hikers and such on the trail, thinks it's a safety hazard, but those two are in the minority.  Interestingly, the fellow who doesn't like the oil smoke smell says his neighbor has or had a coal furnace, and that smelled OK.
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ebtnut

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« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2013, 02:00:50 PM »

Just so you'll know, I probably won't get up to New Freedom this weekend due to auto repair issues.  The line is advertising a Civil War re-enactment battle next Saturday which I do intend to attend, weather permitting. 
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ebtnut

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« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2013, 10:24:35 AM »

Got up to visit this past Saturday.  Took some photos of the 10 a.m. trip, but I don't have a way to post them here.  Unfortunately, the loco came up lame returning to New Freedom.  Something went wrong in the valve gear, and they had to cancel the rest of the weekend trips.  Repairs are supposed to be done early this week, but if you plan to visit, I'd call first.  The ride is very nice.  If you are really intrepid, you could "chase" the trips on the adjoining rail trail.  Note that the loco runs tender-first to Hanover Jct., with the loco on the point coming back to New Freedom.  Despite being an oil-burner, the loco does produce some smoke which is good for lineside photos. 
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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2013, 10:39:52 AM »

Thanks for the update!
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ebtnut

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« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2013, 05:58:03 PM »

OK, Railpicutures.net posted one of my pics:  http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=441270&nseq=0
The photo was taken as the train entered Glen Rock, near the water treatment plant.  The cars are borrowed from the Reader RR and are built over old flat car frames.  However, they told me that they are having authentic reproduction 1860's era cars built, which might arrive later this year.  My comment about chasing the train on the trail is based on this:  The rail line was damaged badly during tropical storm Agnes in June, 1972 and Conrail decided not to repair it.  The Maryland section was abandoned and torn up north of Cockeysville.  From there to Baltimore it is now the Hunt Valley Light Rail line.  York County took control of the line from New Freedome to York, and eventually allowed the Stewartstown RR to use it.  However, since the line had been double track, there was room along side the remaining single track, so there is now a hiker-biker trail along the whole distance from York to Cockeysville.  A stalwart biker could probably keep up with the train most of the way. 
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jonathan


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« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2013, 06:52:53 AM »

That is one professional looking photo.  No wonder they published it.  Nice shot, ebtnut!

Regards,

Jonathan
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ebtnut

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« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2013, 11:13:22 AM »

Thanks for the compliment, Jonathon.

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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2013, 01:18:18 PM »

Great photo, EB!

That coach doesn't look so bad, though, of course, its style of roof is too late for the early to mid 1860s.

I just wish they hadn't given the locomotive that chicken-coop pilot. ...  Roll Eyes
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J3a-614

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« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2013, 07:13:14 PM »

I wouldn't complain too much about that "chicken coop" pilot, partially because it's a bit different from the wooden pilots so often seen, and also because it's authentic for a Pennsylvania Railroad or Pennsylvania predecessor company in the 19th century.  Check out the Civil War era photos at Hanover Junction (in particular the one that appears to have Abraham Lincoln on the platform), and you'll see those pilots were very much in use then.

Now, what I would really like to see would be very authentic passenger cars, with proper period trucks under them.  That would be a time trip!
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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2013, 01:32:28 PM »

I wouldn't complain too much about that "chicken coop" pilot, partially because it's a bit different from the wooden pilots so often seen, and also because it's authentic for a Pennsylvania Railroad or Pennsylvania predecessor company in the 19th century.  Check out the Civil War era photos at Hanover Junction (in particular the one that appears to have Abraham Lincoln on the platform), and you'll see those pilots were very much in use then.

Oh, I know all that, thank you very much. Authenticity has nothing to do with it. I just think those chicken-coop pilots are ugly. They were ugly in the 1850s and they were still ugly nearly a century later when the PRR was still using a version of them. Distinctive, to be sure, but  ... just plain ugly.  Cheesy
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