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Author Topic: New Arrivals  (Read 11821 times)
electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2015, 07:19:32 PM »

Austrian;
There are non-flammable, non-corrosive paints that can be prepared for airbrush use.  I sensed that I upset you.  I get a lot of that from Europeans.  Is there some axe you guys have to grind with Yanks?  I am sorry; I will not do that or bother you again-at all!  Lots of luck.

Rich C.

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Len

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« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2015, 09:22:40 PM »

Rich,

I have found several sites that list water based acrylic paints as "**HAZ Shipping Restrictions Apply", probably because of that stupid Calif Prop 65. The UK, and several other European countries, have similar restriction, possibly even tighter.

Len
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If at first you don't succeed, throw it in the spare parts box.
electrical whiz kid

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« Reply #32 on: October 11, 2015, 08:34:09 AM »

OK, Wayne; I can dig it.  I read several articles in the online "Railroad Hobbyist" site on paints about 18 mos ago, and it was pretty good.  In one article, I read that it is possible to use the acrylics presently found in craft shops.  There is a preparation procedure but, they say, it works just fine.  I am curious about that, so one day, I will try that.  I am getting ready to paint, as the general humidity drops in winter.

Up until now, I have been shooting the Floquil organic (lacquer) paints I have.  If nothing else, I will look at the "Scalecoat" line. 

RIch C.
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jbrock27

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« Reply #33 on: October 11, 2015, 08:52:18 AM »

I read that it is possible to use the acrylics presently found in craft shops...they say, it works just fine.
RIch C.

Yep. While I do not have an air brush and use spray bombs for painting, I have also heard/read of people using those acrylics with success.  I do use such paints to create a weathering wash and like the results.
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Keep Calm and Carry On
Trainman203

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« Reply #34 on: October 11, 2015, 02:35:53 PM »

 Austrian says "As USRA design this loco does not feature a Belpaire fireboxe so the red would help it give it a Pennsy identity."

I had a 1950 kalmbach book called "steam locomotives" long ago.  There was an article about oddball steam locomotives with a picture of a PRR USRA 2-8-2 without a BP firebox.  What I don't remember is if it was a one of a kind on one or several, but it wasn't  very many, the PRR apparently took them under protest, and didn't  like them very much.

  What you can't  tell is the color of the cab roof.  The SR sometimes painted the roof and deck red, sometimes didn't.  I bet it was the same with the PRR.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
J3a-614

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« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2015, 03:55:45 PM »


I had a 1950 kalmbach book called "steam locomotives" long ago.  There was an article about oddball steam locomotives with a picture of a PRR USRA 2-8-2 without a BP firebox.  What I don't remember is if it was a one of a kind on one or several, but it wasn't  very many, the PRR apparently took them under protest, and didn't  like them very much.


That's about right.  The PRR got a number of such engines--if my memory is right, about 40--but didn't want them and sold most of them.  The road kept about five, and all were stationed at some out-of-the-way minor engine terminal in Ohio.  Most notable change was that all got high headlights, which was a PRR standard.

The PRR did wind up with a fairly large number--I think over 100--USRA light 2-10-2s (which Bachmann made).  These they kept, but as they came due for firebox renewal were rebuilt to Belpaire types.  Although that changed the back end of the boiler a bit, and the headlight was high mounted, the rest of the engine, including the cab, front end proportions, Southern valve gear on some of them, trailing truck, and tender didn't look al all like anything standard for the PRR.  Again, all these engines were normally assigned to Lines West in Ohio, where they muscled iron ore around in the company of PRR's own home designed 2-10-2s, which were a Lines West design of massive proportions, very different details (including an oddball cab), and (unusual for PRR) were all built by commercial locomotive firms (most of PRR's designs had at least some examples built in Altoona). 

An interesting detail--quite a number of Lines West engines, including standard PRR types such as H-9 2-8-0s and K4s 4-6-2s, had for a time a CENTERED headlight, like what you would see on NYC! 

Now you have an idea for a project with a Bachmann K4s that will set your PRR modelling friends into a tizzy--and you can say it's prototypical!!
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Trainman203

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« Reply #36 on: October 11, 2015, 04:15:59 PM »

I never liked the look of the PRR high headlight.  I always thought that the K 4 in particular would look much better with a centered headlight.

Why did the PRR into modern  times keep doing high mounted headlights, an earlier design affectation, that was harder to maintain?  And in the late 40s PRR put it even higher, behind a turbo generator whose exhaust could obscure the beam.  Why all of that? Anyone know?  I've always wondered.
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
J3a-614

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« Reply #37 on: October 11, 2015, 04:59:15 PM »

I never liked the look of the PRR high headlight.  I always thought that the K 4 in particular would look much better with a centered headlight.

Why did the PRR into modern  times keep doing high mounted headlights, an earlier design affectation, that was harder to maintain?  And in the late 40s PRR put it even higher, behind a turbo generator whose exhaust could obscure the beam.  Why all of that? Anyone know?  I've always wondered.

From what I understand, the change was basically swapping the positions of the tubogenerator and headlight.  I've been told the reasoning was that the generator required more maintenance than the light, so the road made the generator easier to reach.

Another road that liked high headlights was the B&O.  That road also would mount bells off center, and some people thought that made B&O steam ugly, even if it was necessary with some of the tight clearances on that road.

Interstingly the NYC adopted high headlights on its last steam power--2-8-4s built for Pittsburgh & Lake Erie, and of course the last great engines for NYC itself, the Niagara 4-8-4s.  I've never understood the reason the NYC did this then, but there were a lot of other design details on the Niagaras that went with a tight clearance road, like a domeless boiler, access steps that folded up, turbogenerators mounted under the running boards (a location shared with C&O's J-3a Greenbriars) and a bell mounted behind the pilot--and I wonder how well that location worked out with all the snow in NYC territory!
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J3a-614

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« Reply #38 on: October 11, 2015, 08:59:08 PM »

PRR N1s:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRR_N1s

http://www.angelfire.com/film/prrpics/n17248.JPG

http://www.angelfire.com/film/prrpics/n17342.JPG

http://www.bartfk.cba.pl/gfx/lok/PRR_N1s_prr7128s.jpg

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/prr9861s.jpg

PRR N2sa (which as it turns out was USRA Heavy, not Light):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRR_N2sa

http://www.angelfire.com/film/prrpics/n17248.JPG

And for fun, the PRR 2-8-0, Lines West style:

http://prrsteam.pennsyrr.com/images/prr8527.jpg

And the iconic K4s:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2e/PRR_K4s_8212.jpg






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RAM

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« Reply #39 on: October 11, 2015, 10:03:10 PM »

Boy that 2-8-0 and the K4 sure don't look pennsy.
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Rob Montanye


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« Reply #40 on: October 12, 2015, 12:49:39 AM »

just an question from someone that has quite a fleet of the old school climaxes?

The gearbox is locked up on my original run ones. The "new" gearbox with the metal gears.....can the gearboxes be bought seperately & if so, will they work in the old run ones as sort of a direct replacement? I have about 4 of the old ones, (a 2 trk model & 3 three-truck ones) I don't really want to have to buy all new models for a fix Sad

Rob
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J3a-614

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« Reply #41 on: October 12, 2015, 03:39:39 AM »

Boy that 2-8-0 and the K4 sure don't look pennsy.

And the changes aren't big at all!  Besides the big early centered headlights, you have wooden pilots and Lines West tenders.   That's it as far as I can tell!

The wooden pilots suggest photos no later than the mid 1920s.  PRR proper was still using wooden pilots at the time as well, and the headlights on at least some other engines were still the box types that looked like something from the 19th century.  There might be some detail variations as well, such as the lack of a power reverse, a straight running board, and inthe case of E6s and K4s engines, extended piston rods.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRR_K4s#/media/File:PRR-K4s-BuildersPhoto.jpg

http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/Locomotives/PRR%20K4s%201737%20ME3092A%201st%20Built%20May%201914%20a%20800x616.jpg

Now here would be something really different, but maybe still made with the existing K4s mechanism with modifications (maybe, maybe)--the K3s:

http://prrsteam.pennsyrr.com/images/prr7004.jpg

Five of the K3s were sold, without tenders, to the N&W, which supplied their own tanks.  Also, note how appearances change just by centering the headlight on these two N&W E-3s:  

http://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/thumbs/photos/NW06331.jpg

http://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/thumbs/photos/NW06331.jpg
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 03:52:39 AM by J3a-614 » Logged
Desertdweller

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« Reply #42 on: October 12, 2015, 12:27:36 PM »

The craft-type acrylic paints (such as Apple Barrel) can be used in an airbrush with a little preparation.  I have done it successfully.
The two most important considerations are that the pigments are coarser than those in "model paints", and the importance of using pure water, as impurities will cause the paint to coagulate.

You can thin the paint for spraying with Model Master acrylic thinner, or with a mixture of denatured alcohol and distilled water.

Very important:  after thinning the paint, pour it through a fine-meshed tea strainer.  Then it can be sprayed with an airbrush.  You me have to clean the airbrush after a few minutes, as the paint dries quickly in the spray nozzle.

The main advantages I find with this paint is its wider availability.  It is also much cheaper than regular model paint, it dries quickly to a flat finish, it doesn't have dangerous fumes, it won't burn, and the different colors will mix easily to get the shade you want.  If you don't wait until it hardens, it can be washed off with soap and water.

Les
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2015, 01:04:36 PM »

Les.....

All good points. Have you tried using Windex as a thinner? I've been using it with any acrylic for years.

Sid
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jbrock27

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« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2015, 07:17:48 PM »

I have, as a result of your direction Wink
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