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Author Topic: “Frog” in turnout  (Read 1051 times)
Trainman203

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« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2018, 01:36:09 PM »

Correct!!!!!!
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Modeling the New Iberia and Northern 1945
ebtnut

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« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2018, 04:37:40 PM »

I don't recall the source right now, but rail lengths were a function of "normal" car lengths.  I believe it had to do with having all the weight of a car on one rail instead of the flexation caused by only one end at a time being on the rail.  Rail lengths were 33 feet in the late 19th century, increased to 36 feet in the early 20th, then to 39 feet as the "standard" box cars went from 30 feet to 36 feet to 40 feet.  That stayed pretty much the standard through World War 2.  Then came the introduction of CWR in quarter-mile lengths.  Interestingly, at least in one case I witnessed personally in the 1980's, the rail mill in Steelton, PA (just south of Harrisburg) produced 39 foot rails.  These were shipped about 10 miles north to Conrail's rail welding facility where the short lengths were welded into the 1/4 mile lengths for final track-laying.  Not sure how common that was elsewhere, but it was partly a function of steel mill not wanting, or able, to produce the long rails directly.
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Ken Clark

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« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2018, 08:15:43 PM »

  Interesting to note that CWR was in service as early as  1889, the Norfolk and Western had a 3 miles stretch installed. The rail was electric welded and also used on street railways.
  Information from " The Science Of Railways" published in 1903.

  Ken C
   GWN
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