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Author Topic: Mallet comments  (Read 4024 times)
glennk28

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« on: February 11, 2009, 09:47:39 PM »

My Oregon Lumber Co. mallet arrived today--very nicely done model.  I like that you finally got a good color for the headlight LED's. 

Unpacking these larger locos is almost a 2-man job.  It would help if a sheet were packed somewhere in the upper layers of the bos diagraming where to lift, or where NOT to lift in getting the model out of the box.  I managed to destroy the front footboard. 

I managed to find and change the cab steps--for those who haven't changed them yet--you have to remove the mounting plate from the steps you remove--I would think that it wouldn't have been that much to include the plate with both sets of steps.

The booklet and DVD both indicate that Baldwin did not build any 3-foot gauge mallets--what about Uintah 50 and 51?

as to pulling power--I backed ther mallet own to the end of the workbench and coupled to the K-27--which has the motor turned off--it did mansge to drag the dead Mike --with some slippage.  ;
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Cascade Northern

Cascade Northern Railroad


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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2009, 12:00:37 AM »

Technically Uintah #50 and #51 are not a mallet, they are just an articulated locomotive.  A mallet is a compound locomotive that uses steam twice, first in high pressure cylinders and then in lower pressure cylinders. Uintah #50 and #51 used high pressure steam in all four cylinders.  So, technically speaking, Baldwin did not build any 3-foot gauge mallets.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2009, 12:05:51 AM by Cascade Northern » Logged

Jon D. Miller

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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2009, 01:42:38 AM »

Here's a short video of the 2-6-6-2T with 27 loads and a cabin.  The locomotive handled these with ease.  Now, I will say that there is only one grade on the layout.  The grade is 1% and runs along the back of the layout. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t31nsEfMuCo

There's a second video, on this You Tube site,  of the same train running on the back section of the layout.

The 2-6-6-2T did not seem to be at its limit with this train.  Just need more 1:20.3 rolling stock to find out what it will really pull.



One of the "Enthusiastic Children"

JD

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glennk28

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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 04:38:43 AM »

I'm aware that the Uintah locos were single-expansion locos, but the term "Mallet" has tended to encompass all "two-engine" steam locos.  Even so, the only ones built for USA service were the two Uintah locos.  gj
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Cascade Northern

Cascade Northern Railroad


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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2009, 11:10:20 AM »

By definition Uintah #50 and #51 are not Mallets.  Neither are the UP Big Boys or Challanger locomotives as they are compounds. The very general term "Mallet" is railfan slang to help ease identification.
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glennk28

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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2009, 10:03:45 PM »

not just railfans--Southern Pacific referred to all of the Cab Forwartds, and the few regular-direction articulateds as "Malleys" (note the pronunciation)  They also referred to a bunch of rather large Moguls as "Valley Malleys" as sthey could handle "Malley-sized" loads in the Central Valley lines. 

Meanwhile--I have been working on installing Accucraft couplers on mine--got the rear one done.  Don't need to take out that centering spring gismo.  gj
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zubi


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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2009, 12:35:50 AM »

I'm aware that the Uintah locos were single-expansion locos, but the term "Mallet" has tended to encompass all "two-engine" steam locos.  Even so, the only ones built for USA service were the two Uintah locos.  gj

GJ, the Uintah articulted locomotives are refferred to as Mallets because of the type of the frame arrangement and articulation they used. So in this respect you are correct - we speak of Uintah Mallets. But there exist several other types of arrangement of two powered trucks other than Mallet type of articulation and your statement above referring to 'all "two engine" steam locos' is simply not correct http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articulated_locomotive Best wishes from Tokyo, Zubi

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glennk28

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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2009, 04:32:24 AM »

Yes--probably not the best choice of terms to describe it--particularly since most of the models these days aren't even attached to the frame like the original Mallets and single-expansion locos--I have Weiner's book and LeMassena's 2-volumes--and am aware of Kitson Meyer and Beyer-Garratt locos, among others.  Like tonight--it was getting late--

Meanwhile--has anyone else attempted top change couplers?  If I'd gotten the loco a month ago (while the weather was dry)  I would have taken it to Kadee for Sam to get a look at--although I am now using the Accucraft couplers (which will mount in a Kadee short box).  The AC coupler fits nicely on the back end beam--Kadee's #779 would mount similarly, but has a larger mounting footprint.  will try it later this morning.  We're finally getting winter, and there are a lot of crazies out on the interstate who seem to think they can do the speed limit on packed snow, black ice, or who knows what else might be coming down. Interstate was shut down several hours Wed. due to accidents.  No sense getting out into that.  gj
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christo

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« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2009, 05:36:32 PM »

Hello,

does someone know the track gauge of the 2-6-6-2.  Isn´t it standard gauge?  I thought baldwin did only build the two Unitah´s as articulated narrow gauge locos. Is the scale of the model real 1:20.3?

I´hope my english isn´t too bad.  I´m from germany.

Thank you for your answers

christo
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locoron

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« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2009, 07:51:58 PM »


The 2-6-6-2 was designed as a narrow gauge mallet, but never built.
Bachmann chose an excellent prototype. I think mine is great.

Your English is a heck of a lot better than some of our high school grads so don't worry about it.

locoron
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glennk28

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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2009, 05:05:56 PM »

I got the other (front) coupler changed.  What a job!  I think a Kadee 830 will work on the front--bur you need to completely disassemble the front end to really do the job right.  Question for anyone else getting into this--How many/which screws need to be removed in order to take the front pilot deck (plastic) off of the metal frame extension?  In order to mount the accucraft coupler I cut off the angle piece (the "shelf" that forms the top of the coupler box) and mountred the AC box to the end beam Still have to hook jp the coupler links.  I'd sure like to see Bachmann re-tool that knuckle coupler!

I may remove the cab roof and replace that dark orange cab light. 

gj
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samevans


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« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2009, 10:41:19 AM »


Technically Uintah #50 and #51 are not a mallet, they are just an articulated locomotive.  A mallet is a compound locomotive that uses steam twice, first in high pressure cylinders and then in lower pressure cylinders. Uintah #50 and #51 used high pressure steam in all four cylinders.  So, technically speaking, Baldwin did not build any 3-foot gauge mallets.
[/quote]

Technically Uintah #50 & #51are SEMI - articulateds.  The rear engine unit is rigid with the locomotive and only the front unit is articulated.  The LGB model and the B'mann Logging locos are modelled as fully articulated as they have to cope with far sharper curves than the real thing. 

Anatole Mallet devised his semi articulated system in pursuit of 4 cyl compounding so a simple semi articulated using Mallets design is not a full Mallet according to his patent.

The Uintah locos I believe were the first fully simple locomotives to use Mallet's semi articulation,  being precursors of the Big Boys and similar.  I suspect that the Uintah locos were so designed for the extra power required by their extreme work load.  The big standard gauge locos adopted the simple system because the compound LP cylinders had grown so large that they imposed speed restrictions on the locos that carried them.  In order to continue to apply semi articulation to very large locos AND keep up freight speeds  use of the simple system was the logical next step.

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John Ramsden

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« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2009, 10:20:50 PM »

  Grin I'd sure like to see Bachmann re-tool that knuckle coupler! Shocked

They did.  Grin On the new cars, it seems they deepened the pocket.

Try to manually couple an older 1:22 talgo coupler with the new 1:20 coupler.

The old one will fail to latch.

Good downward compatability, and more expensive, and smaller road # selection than the other 1:20 scale car supplier.
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John
glennk28

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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2009, 12:06:27 AM »

it still doesn't LOOK like a type E coupler.  gj
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