ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 09, 2018, 10:30:07 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  N
| | |-+  New to N scale
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: New to N scale  (Read 2533 times)
HO-N-Engineer

View Profile
« on: December 20, 2017, 04:48:41 AM »

I'm looking for a few more pieces of track to expand the Super Chief set that I got for my son and I to have fun with for Christmas. I need curved track to do a one ended double oval? What size track will I need? I have tried a layout software and it seems as you need 11.25" track to make a 24" circle, so would I get more 11.25" curved track to do the outside end of the oval? I have some straight track to turn the circle into a simple oval already, and I bought the left and right turnouts for this new layout. I just need to know what curves come with the Super Chief set.

What's the best source for layout ideas for N scale??

Thanks
Logged

Here's to history.
Piyer


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 12:10:18 PM »

Today being the 20th, I would strongly suggest that you "get thee to a hobby shoppe" (to paraphrase Hamlet). You could use a broader radius than the set track - which is probably 11.25" (it should be cast on the underside of the track) - or you can use the same radius and just use straight filler pieces to split the half circle into quarter circles.
Logged

~AJ Kleipass~
Actively modeling in N, HO, and 2-rail O scales.
Bipeflier


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2017, 12:20:14 PM »

Sorry I can't help with the track that comes with the set you have but it is easily measured.

As for layout ideas, I have used a book called "N scale model railroad track plans" published by Model Railroader years ago.  It is available on Amazon  https://www.amazon.com/Scale-Model-Railroad-Track-Plans/dp/0890245096
Good luck and have fun.
Logged

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional
HO-N-Engineer

View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2017, 10:32:56 PM »

I had the opportunity to get some track that will arrive before Christmas so I took the chance hoping that 11.25" will work. I guess if I find it isn't perfect the right size is always available, and a place for what I bought in a bigger layout. We actually get to unveil the set on Christmas Day, so I won't know the size of the track in the set until then. There are no real hobby shops in this area. The dumb thing is they are really needed, but the largest and best went out of business about 7 years ago. There was one about 50 miles away, but I've heard they have done away with a lot of their model sales to concentrate on coins and stamps. Get that, stamps over models.

Well, I guess online stores and that old time auction on the net will have to do.

I'll check out that book and see what inspiration it can bring me in the small space I have for a creative layout.

Thanks all.
Logged

Here's to history.
HO-N-Engineer

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2017, 02:44:58 PM »

It's amazing how something as simple as model railroading will help you to remember your basic electronics. Let's see how far I can get trying to remember something I was originally taught about 33 years ago.

My son likes his train set at this point. He wants to so a figure 8 track, but I need a few more curved track pieces. To ask a new question, what is a good amount of track, curved, straight, and lengths to have on hand when starting out. I cut a piece of 1/2 inch plywood at 36" x 50". It was a piece I got from picking pallets, so I couldn't find a longer one in the house. This is what I will use until I can made a larger portable table with scenery. Of course my son will be part of picking all the buildings and other pieces, so who knows how portable it will be.

Oh, one last thing. I have one piece of curved track that the engine seems to get lagged down when it travels over it. I tried cleaning it, but that didn't seem to do much. What else can I do?
Logged

Here's to history.
spookshow


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2017, 09:15:17 AM »

Oh, one last thing. I have one piece of curved track that the engine seems to get lagged down when it travels over it. I tried cleaning it, but that didn't seem to do much. What else can I do?

Could be a weak joiner? I don't know if Bachmann sells those ala carte (I don't see them listed on this website), so maybe just try replacing the offending curve with a different one.

-Mark
Logged

brokemoto

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2017, 10:15:31 AM »

Could be a weak joiner? I don't know if Bachmann sells those ala carte, try replacing the offending curve with a different one.

-Mark

It could be a misaligned rail joiner.  That is not an infrequent occurrence with the B-mann track (or Atlas or PECo, for that matter--Kato seems to be the only one resistant to it, but it can happen even on UNITRACK).  If you will check the joints on the offending track, make sure that the rail joiner is properly fitted to the next section.

Weak joiners do happen on B-mann track, but less frequently than they do on Atlas.  One of the problems with the B-mann track is that the joiners are affixed so tightly that if you try to get it off to insulate or isolate a section of trackage, you wind up ruining the track piece.  If I must have a gap in the B-mann track, I use two pieces of Atlas sectional (or two short pieces of flex) and put the plastic rail joiners between the two pieces of Atlas.  I suppose that you could file a gap in the middle of the section, but I always have shied from that.

I have found a few malformed sections of B-mann track, over time, that caused stalls and derailments.  I purchase a little more than I need in case I must swap out an offending section.  Swapping out an offending section for a fresh one always has addressed the problem.  Further, I have encountered this only on the eleven inch sections.  The straights, turnouts and broader curves have not shown this problem.
Logged
HO-N-Engineer

View Profile
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2017, 06:24:45 PM »

Thanks for the help. I ordered another 6 sections of curved 11.25" track to help build the number of layouts we can try. I want to find some 10" straight at a good price to match the 10" rerailer I bought. It's starting to be the right time to stop buying and start enjoying.

I have another question though. (Gee, that's a surprise, right?) What coupler is the right one to use if I want to expand using just DC? Are the Rapido the best couplers to use, or would you go with something else to make the the rolling stock more universal? I don't know if I will change over to something else. I don't think it will be Bachmann until my son decides he wants to get sophisticated.

Learn the basics as long as the track can handle the setup and then move on I guess.
Logged

Here's to history.
spookshow


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2017, 08:02:23 PM »

I don't think anybody sells locomotives or rolling stock with Rapidos anymore. All of the various knuckle couplers out there (E-Z Mate, Kato, Accumate, McHenry, MTL, et al) are all pretty much compatible with each other. Rapidos only work with other Rapidos.

-Mark
Logged

HO-N-Engineer

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2017, 12:17:55 AM »

I don't think anybody sells locomotives or rolling stock with Rapidos anymore. All of the various knuckle couplers out there (E-Z Mate, Kato, Accumate, McHenry, MTL, et al) are all pretty much compatible with each other. Rapidos only work with other Rapidos.

-Mark

Ok, I don't know which coupler it is I have, but I'll try to attach a couple of pictures.





The first is the caboose from the set showing the replacement couplers that came with the set, and the second are two cars I bought with the coupler that came with the set. As you can see the second picture is a match, but the caboose has a smaller coupler.

What are the chances that the replacement couplers will match other cars from other makers?
Logged

Here's to history.
spookshow


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2017, 06:15:26 AM »

The big clunky squarish looking couplers are Rapidos. They were the de facto standard coupler in N scale up until the early 2000's (developed by the Arnold-Rapido company of Germany back in the 1960s) and a lot of older models will have them. I think Bachmann still includes them as ala carte replacements with some of their models (for backwards compatibility), but for the most part they have been retired by the industry.

-Mark
« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 06:27:06 AM by spookshow » Logged

Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!