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Author Topic: Mr Bach Mann - New Structures  (Read 3926 times)
Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« on: February 09, 2008, 05:21:38 AM »

We are modeling a western dude ranch and can't find any suitable buildings.  We would like to have a large "great house" like the Ponderosa on Bonanza,  realistic log cabins for guests, stables, barns without silos, equipment sheds (modern Butler style, not the old quonsets), etc.

Any thing in the works for new items that would fit our theme?

I have a suggestion...HO scale version of the old wooden Lincoln Logs in various lengths.  You have a log cabin, but we want the more modern square cut timbers. The pieces could be molded in wood grain styrene and painted, or premolded in light wood colors.   

Thanks
Yampa Bob
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I know what I wrote, I don't need a quote
Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
Terry Toenges


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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2008, 01:02:03 PM »

Bob,
If you are interested in craftsman kits, contact me off the board. I have some I will sell.
I have unassembled Muir Models kits of -
Ponderosa ranch house
Pondersoa bunk house
Ponderosa cattle weighing and loading pens
2 Donner Pass snowsheds
I also have an unassembled Speed Craft Pacific Railway 3 stall engine house and an unopened Bachmann Old West marshal's office and restaurant.
I want to sell the whole lot together since I'm no longer doing an Old West HO layout.
I'd like to sell them to someone who would use them rather than just put them on Ebay.
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2008, 03:57:21 PM »

You could scratchbuild some structures out of stripwood
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Yampa Bob

Y.V.R.R.


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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2008, 02:05:38 AM »

Yeah I could, picked up some Midwest basswood lapboard in two widths.  The sheets are all curled up so I have to wet them and weight them down first.   Just like real lumber, can't buy good stuff anymore.

The hardest part will be the metal roofs.  Evergreen's so called metal is just a flat sheet with lots of grooves, you have to glue in  tiny strips and doesn't look real

Bob
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I know what I wrote, I don't need a quote
Rule Number One: It's Our Railroad.  Rule Number Two: Refer to Rule Number One.
Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 10:57:13 PM »

http://[flash=200,200][size=10pt][size=10pt][size=10pt][size=10pt]Isn't there a type of modeling wood sold by [u]Micro-Mark [/u] and others that looks like a variety of patterns, including currugated metal roofing?[/size][/size][/size][/size][/flash]
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Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2008, 10:58:36 PM »

Sorry, I don't know why that happened.  Huh?

What it should say is:


Isn't there a type of modeling wood sold by Micro-Mark and others that looks like a variety of patterns, including currugated metal roofing?

 


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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2008, 12:56:53 AM »

Bob....

Drop me an email to the "shaw.ca" addy in my profile. I don't think the messaging feature works on this board.

TTY Soon.

Sid
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railsider

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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2011, 02:39:25 PM »

Yampa Bob.........................

If you cannot find pre-milled plastic or wood (to paint) in that roof pattern, just take smooth aluminum foil, reasonably heavy, and press the grooves in from one side with a wood, plastic or metal object, like a ball-point pen, and a ruler. Work on a slightly soft surface, like a mouse-pad or even a pad of paper, and experiment to find what works best for you. Then turn it over, cut to size, and install on the roof. You can paint (or add "rust") to taste.

Railsider
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