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Discussion Boards => General Discussion => Topic started by: BradKT on March 08, 2010, 09:49:55 PM



Title: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 08, 2010, 09:49:55 PM
I am building a DCC layout that is about 80-85% complete. 

I have seen automated functions in layouts where a train stops at a stop (such as a station or a factory)  and then restarts and continues on after a set period of time.  I checked with Circuitron and, while they have the circuit boards that enable DC powered trains to do this, they don't have anything that would work with DCC.

Is there anything out there that would enable the automation of a DCC layout so that my trains could make automatic stops?


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: poliss on March 08, 2010, 09:56:35 PM
Yes, the new Hornby Sapphire decoder can do this. Don't know how easy it is to get in the USA.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 08, 2010, 10:01:55 PM
Could you explain a little more about this works or refer me to a website that does?

I should have put this question in my original post.  Is there anything out there that would work with a Bachmann EZ-Command DCC system?  If not, what kind of system would it work with?  I use Digitrax DCC decoders in my engines, which are either Atlas or Athearn.  I also have a few Bachmann DCC engines that use Bachmann DCC decoders.

Are we talking about a system that is controlled by a PC or what?

I need to learn a little more about this in order to determine whether this is a feasible idea.  I idea that I have in mind is automating 1 or 2 stops at the refinery, the cement plant, the passenger station and the truck-rail terminal.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 08, 2010, 10:06:24 PM
Could you explain a little more about this works or refer me to a website that does?

I should have put this question in my original post.  Is there anything out there that would work with a Bachmann EZ-Command DCC system?  If not, what kind of system would it work with?  I use Digitrax DCC decoders in my engines, which are either Atlas or Athearn.  I also have a few Bachmann DCC engines that use Bachmann DCC decoders.

Are we talking about a system that is controlled by a PC or what?

I need to learn a little more about this in order to determine whether this is a feasible idea.  I idea that I have in mind is automating 1 or 2 stops at the refinery, the cement plant, the passenger station and the truck-rail terminal...and maybe regulating the speed of the trains.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: poliss on March 08, 2010, 10:18:30 PM
It's a DCC decoder feature. Your controller needs to be able to operate CVs in the 127-140 range. I don't think this is possible with the E-Z Command, but the Dynamis could do it.
Here's a (rather complicated) guide on how it works. http://www.ontracks.co.uk/index.php?page=fromLibrary&guide=155


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 08, 2010, 10:37:34 PM
A station stop is easy to implement with any decoder that features "stop on dc."  The only other things you need are a block occupancy detector to start a timer when the train arrives in the station block, the timer to time the station stop, a relay to switch the block over to DCC when the timer times out, and a source of dc power.

If you have many locomotives that you would like to choose from and do not feel like replacing all those decoders, there is another approach.  Use a Digitrax DB150 booster set on "program" in place of the dc power supply.  In program mode, this booster sends out an "all stop" signal which will stop all locomotives that it is powering, no matter what their addresses.  A train entering the station block will be powered by the DB150, which will stop it and start a timer.  The timer will throw a relay after some period of time to connect the station block to the regular DCC booster, restarting the locomotive(s).  Beauty of this is that the deceleration and acceleration rates set in the locomotive(s) still apply so the stops and starts are gentle and can be easily adjusted.

If you have an extra computer available, you could consider using JMRI's Panel Pro to do the same job.  The program is available for free but you need an interface between the computer and a compatible command station (it has to have a suitable Input/Output bus.)  You can use a block occupancy detector to detect when trains arrive in the station block, just like the systems mentioned above, but you also have a neat alternative.  You can instead use transponding, if you have decoders that support it.  With transponding, your computer can identify which locomotive(s) are in the station block and react accordingly.  You could, for example, have all freight trains pass through the station without stopping, and maybe some limited passenger trains run through as well.  But all the local passenger trains and a few limiteds would stop.

With a computer in the loop, automatic station stops are almost trivial.  Beyond that, the sky is the limit.  Anything from a complex railroad running itself to being able to run your layout from anywhere on the planet that you have access to the internet.

Jim

p.s. unfortunately, E-Z Command does not have a suitable bus so the JMRI route is out.  But the other two methods will work.  Using a stop on dc decoder will probably require some programing beyond the E-Z Command's capabilities but that is what friends are for.  Using a DB150 does not require any extra programming.

J.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 09, 2010, 12:14:32 AM
If I am going to seriously consider doing this, I may very well "graduate" to a different power supply/booster system.  I have the basic Digitrax DCC decoders installed my Atlas and Athearn engines.

Would you recommed that I migrate to a Digitrax power supply/booster system?  Any recommendations that aren't prohibitively expensive?  As nice as the feature would be, there does come a point where the expense is just not worth making the trains stop 3 or 4 times on a fairly large layout.   

Is there any system made by Digitrax that could program the basic DCC decoders to make automated stops?  In other words, I am looking for something that would only act on specific decoder addresses (I think).  If I understood Jim Banner's post correctly, using the Digitrax booster would only stop all trains on the layout wherever they are whenever I stopped one at a station.  That won't work for me.  Is there any way that I could use the basic DCC decoders to do this?  Does anyone know where I can read up on this topic to get some more information? 

I hope that I don't have to replace my Digitrax decoders.  If I could program my basic Digitrax decoders to do so just by substituting a Digitrax power supply/booster system for my present Bachmann EZ Command System, then I would seriously consider it.  If I would have to replace the power system plus the decoders and get some sensors, too, then the expense is not worth it to me. 

I'm ignorant on this issue and some of the discussion has gone right over my head. 

What are we really talking about here? 

I hope that my questions are making some sense.

And by the way, I do have a extra PC (Compaq).  I think that it currently has Microsoft Wondows 98 installed on it.

Anyway, that's what I currently have to work with.  Any suggestions?  I am just trying to get some information here.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: lescar on March 09, 2010, 06:01:47 AM
BradKT:

You may want to check out this post,  I asked basically the same question.  It has a lot of good information.

 http://www.bachmanntrains.com/home-usa/board/index.php/topic,11970.msg97158.html#msg97158

Les


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 09, 2010, 12:39:39 PM
First, a clarification.  Using a Digitrax DB150 booster in addition to whatever command station you use to run the rest of the layout would NOT shut down all the trains on the layout when one is stopped in the station.  The relay used in this setup would switch just the isolated station track (just one block of track) from the command station output to the DB150 output.  That would stop the train at the deceleration rate that is programmed into the decoder.  Once the timer had timed out, the relay would switch the station track back to the command station.  From time to time, command stations update all the commands to active addresses.  The next update would start the train at the station moving again, accelerating up to speed at the acceleration rate programmed into the decoder.  Even though I have called it a station track, the isolated section of track could be anywhere on the layout.

Now you probably would not want every train to stop at the station.  One way of handling this would be small magnets on the locomotive detected by reed switches beside the track.  These would trigger a "no-go" timer which would prevent the automatic stop circuit from working for a while, at least long enough for that train to make it past the station.

I am not sure if all Digitrax decoders include stop on dc but I will check.  If they do, that would be a cheaper solution than using a second booster.

Jim


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: lescar on March 09, 2010, 04:36:51 PM
BradKT:

I just saw this at Tony's Train and thought of this post, not sure if this will work for you, but it worth a shot.

http://www.tonystrains.com/technews/station_stopper.htm

EDITED: Sorry jump the gun, I didn't notice that was discontinued.

Les


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 09, 2010, 09:17:25 PM
Just my two cents here, I use reed switches and magnets attched to my rolling stock that I want to stop. By doing this no matter what engine is pulling my passenger cars they stop lined up with the platform.

Mr. Banner is going to cost me money if I keep reading his post regarding DCC, I love the thought of the loco's smoothly starting and stopping.

NM


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 09, 2010, 09:33:53 PM
How does the reed switch and magnet setup work?  Does anyone have any pictures or can you refer me to some information to read and to try to digest?  I am unable to picture this setup and how it works in my mind.

If you have problems posting them here, you can e-mail me at:

Bradfordtalamon@att.net



Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 09, 2010, 11:06:38 PM
Hi, it's pretty simple for DC I use these because they are all in one.
first the timer/relay activation

http://www.prosecuritys.com/6062.html
(http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-43078293634554_2096_86248064)


1. place a reed switch at left, right, or center of your track at the stop.

2. Place a magnet on the loco or rolling stock so it aligns with the reed switch so it passes over the switch. this will close the switch when it passes over it.

3.connect 12dc to the board at POS.+ & NEG-   

4.connect one side of the reed switch to + pos. side, connect the other side of the reed switch to the "TGR" trigger side. now when the reed switch is activated/closed the timer cycle is started.

Now the track

1.Isolate the section of track that will be your stop/block , gaps at both ends on one rail (dc only needs a gaps on one rail)

2. run a feed wire for track power to the "C" common terminal on the timer/relay


3.run a wire from the "NC" Normally closed terminal to the isolated rail.

now when a loco or car Magnet passes over the reed switch it will activate the timercycle the relay will open and disconnect power from the isolated track which stops your loco. when time expires the relay closes and energizes the rail. and your train starts up.

NOTE: for DCC you will need a board with a DPDT double pole double throw relay. or power a separate DPDT relay from the timer. which means two commons, two normally closed and two normally opened. and both rails would need to be isolated. and connected to these in sets

Please feel free to point out any errors you may see in this post or better ways to do it.
my 2 cents

NM

W


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 10, 2010, 03:50:41 AM
When I talked to Circuitron about if I could do this with DCC, they told me about the method that Narrowminded just set forth.  The only drawback with that approach is that as soon as the train hits the isolated section, it just stops...there is no slow deceleration.  That's no problem for Atlas engines, but Athearn and Bachmann engines will stop instantly.  The relay then cycles and restarts and the train starts up again after a set period of time.

I am not going to tear up my layout to isolate a few sections of track on my main lines.

Jim Banner mentioned the use of transponders.  If either Jim or anyone else could explain that approach to me, I'd like to hear it.   

1.  Does the transponder go in the engine?

2a.  How is the transponder wired? 
  b.  What does the transponder hook up to?
  c.   Does the transponder react to an optical sensor (block detector) or
       what? 

3a.  What are the optical sensors (block detectors) wired to? 
   b.  A circuit board? 
   c.  Am I correct that the optical sensors operate on DC power as an     
       accessory and need a separate power source?

4.  Are the optical sensors (block detectors) mounted in the track?

I have some experience using Circuitron's crossing signals in conjunction with optical sensors mounted in the track.  If I am envisioning the transponder approach correctly, we are talking about a transponder for EACH engine in a consist, as well as for each train...which would presumably be mounted in the locomotive.  I also assume that each transponder has to be individually programmed, which is beyond the capabilities of the EZ Command System.

Couple that with the optical sensors (block detectors) to go in the track and the appropriate circuit board to wire them to...plus the power source.

I would then also have to replace the EZ Command system with a Digitrax Zephyr starter set in order to be able to program the transponders...and that assumes that I can do that with the starter set, but I am going to do a little more research before I do so.

That's my first impression about what we are talking about here and that sounds like it is way too expensive to me.  I have pretty much made up my mind that I am probably going to replace the EZ Command power supply with the Digitrax Zephyr starter set (which I understand includes both the power pack and the booster).

Thanks for the information guys, but this seems like it is just too expensive (not to mention too much work) to me just to have a few trains make 3 or 4  automated stops.  It's a nice feature and I don't knock it, but there is a question of diminishing returns to consider here.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 11, 2010, 01:10:37 AM
That thought did occur to me.  I have and I am thoroughly reading them before I make any final decisions.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: guslcp on March 11, 2010, 02:02:42 AM
Most (I'm 99% sure all...) D'trax decoders have the option to enable DC response.  I believe it's one of the many default settings on the decoders.  To accomplish what you want, use the DC section in front of your platform and any engine that gets into the station will come SMOOTHLY to a stop.  The DC section would need to be wired from a DPDT toggle switch, so to get the train going again, you would switch to DCC and the train would  SMOOTHLY start up again.  Or you can use one of the many relay setups described by others....Once out of the station you set the toggle switch to DC which will activate the same response whenever another train enters the DC section, or leave it on DCC so any trains you don't want to stop, don't.  The acceleration and deceleration settings you have set up on your CV's will work just the same way as when you turn down the throttle....


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 11, 2010, 02:32:58 AM
An excellent suggestion from Hunt, as usual.

After doing some perusing of manuals myself, I came across another way of creating a stopping block.  It is under the title Brake Generator Example on page 33 of the Digitrax Decoder Manual.  The manual can be download in pdf format by clicking on this link:

http://www.digitrax.com/ftp/decodermanual.pdf (http://www.digitrax.com/ftp/decodermanual.pdf)

I think what we are heading toward is a low cost system with a magnet on the locomotive you want to stop or on the specific car you want to stop.  When the magnet passes a reed switch, the closure of the reed switch starts a timer which pulls in a relay.  The relay switches a section of track from DCC power to dc power, causing the locomotive to decelerate smoothly to a stop.  After the timer runs out, the relay drops out, switching the section of track back to DCC and the locomotive smoothly accelerates back up to speed.  If you are interested in having different kinds of cars stop at different places, there are at least four suitable locations for magnets - top left side, top right side, bottom left side, bottom right side, in all cases hidden inside the car.

Note to BradKT - There is no need to rip up any trackwork to create an isolated section.  Just add some gaps, typically four.  If you use E-Z Track, all you need is an Atlas hobby saw to cut through the rail joiners between two sections.  Then slip some paper in the gaps and saturate the paper with ACC.  The next day, you can trim the paper flush with the rail heads and file smooth.  The paper is to keep the rail ends from touching.  You do not need insulated joiners if the base of the track is nailed/glued/screwed in place.  If your track is NOT firmly in place, cut the gaps in the center of a section.  Apply the paper as above.  The ties and base will hold the rails in alignment.  My own H0 layout has been rewired several times over the decades and each time seemed to require a different scheme of gapping.  So I would just electrically bypass old gaps and cut new ones.  There are well over a hundred cut gaps in it and none of them cause any trouble.

Jim

p.s.  looks like guslcp has been reading the same manual.

J.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: guslcp on March 11, 2010, 09:08:43 AM
I had to... ;D
About a month ago I got a hankerin' to run some of my older DC locos, some that won't ever see a decoder.  Since I hate to run them on DCC track because of that awful buzzing and whining I decided to make the layout DC/DCC, but in order to not have to remove the DCC engines that would have responded to DC as well, I had to figure out how to disable the DC feature on my decoders.  Took longer to do that than to actually disable all the locos....


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: mabloodhound on March 11, 2010, 10:37:28 AM
So now, just one more question.   What happens to the sound when the loco enters the DC and comes to a stop.   For example, with a Tsunami steam card, does the engine sounds still work when sitting in the station?


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 11, 2010, 04:06:31 PM
The Tsunami would still have power and it is designed to work on both dc and DCC so I suspect it would.  I don't remember that being covered in the manual but a call to Soundtraxx should get you a definitive answer.  Let the rest of us know what they have to say.

Jim


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: BradKT on March 11, 2010, 10:27:00 PM
The one thing that I like about these discussion threads is that they do get the thinkers to come out of the woodwork and actually come up with some very creative solutions.  I understand what Jim Banner said about isolating the track.  I am still not too clear on how to make an isolated section of track go from DCC to DC and back again, but I am going to read the referenced section of the Digitrax manual.

Even if I don't make these changes now, I'm going to save this thread for further reference.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 12, 2010, 12:51:13 AM
Here's one way to do it. if you get a DPDT relay with the same voltage as your dc supply you could use that to power the relay.

Any and everybody feel free to comment, and copy and change the image anyway you want.

NM

(http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/NarrowmindedRR/Blockstop-1.jpg)


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 12, 2010, 02:19:27 AM
Your picture is worth a thousand of my words.  The only thing I would change is that I would put the train detectors inside the isolated section rather than outside it.  This is because you really don't want the isolated section switching to dc power before the locomotive arrives, otherwise the wheels of the locomotive and/or any other metal wheels may connect the output of the dc supply to the output of the DCC supply with unwanted results.

When you connect a DCC booster and a dc supply in parallel, either on purpose or accidentally as above, there is a problem with one of them being dc and the other ac.  On one half cycle of the DCC waveform, the two supplies are matched in polarity and little or no current will flow between them.  But on the other half cycle, their polarities are opposite which is the same as saying they are connected in series with no load to limit the current.  The most likely result would be that the DCC booster would cut in and out but that the current each time it cut in would be high enough to destroy the electronics in the dc supply.  Theoretically, a dc supply with electronic current limiting would take care of this, but I have not tried this in practice.  Note that this current limiting is different than the circuit breaker normally found in a model railroad power back.  Rather than interrupt the circuit when the current exceeds some limit for some length of time, an electronic current limiter never lets the current get higher than the limit in the first place.  Note also the use of the term "booster."  It refers not only to an add on booster connected to the DCC command station but also the booster often built into a command station.  It is easy to forget that a unit like the E-Z Commander is really a throttle, a command station and a booster all integrated into one neat package.

The problems are not insurmountable.  The easiest solution is to make the isolated stopping track long enough.  This is easy with a freight train using all plastic wheels except the locomotive(s).  Then the stopping track needs to be the length of the locomotive(s) plus the stopping distance plus a bit more for safety.  But a passenger train with all lighted cars would require a stopping track a train length long plus plus the stopping distance plus a bit more for safety.  One might think at this point that a freight train will all metal wheels would have to have a stopping track longer than the train, just like the lighted passenger train, but here there is another way out.  A dead (never powered) isolated section longer than the longest freight truck when placed at the beginning of the stopping track will let diesels and steamers with driver and tender pickups through but will not allow individual wheels or trucks to short between the main line and the stopping section.

Jim


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 12, 2010, 07:20:40 AM
Hi. Jim,
my first drawing had the detectors inside the gaps, but then I thought of the momentary loss of power when the relay flips. I thought maybe as long as the DC voltage was set the same as the dcc voltage, the decoder might not see it as DC until the last pickup leaves the dcc track.

Being  non dcc educated I didn't know how the decoder would react with these two flavors in parallel. I didn't know DCC was AC on the tracks either.

Could diodes placed on the DC output protect the DC from the series condition caused by the wave form?

And another crazy thought with out all the facts. What would happen if instead of switching to a separate DC supply,  you use the relay to switch  the DCC through a bridge rectifier changing it from ac to dc?

Just curious about all of it. I know the simple thing would be to have the whole consist on the isolated stop section as you mentioned.

I think of all these little bits of knowledge like spices, once in a while when I am cooking something up all I need is a pinch of this or that to make it turn out delicious. and then theres the times it burst into flames and sets off the smoke detector. :P

NM
 


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: Jim Banner on March 13, 2010, 01:10:27 AM
A diode in the output of the dc supply would protect the dc supply from reverse current during the half cycles when the DCC and the dc were the same polarity, if the voltage of the DCC was higher than the dc.  It would not help on the other half cycles when the DCC booster was trying to suck too much power out of the dc supply.

Using a bridge rectifier to generate the dc from the DCC would have several advantages, including guaranteeing that the dc and DCC voltages matched.  But you would still have to avoid shorting the dc output of the bridge back to the DCC of the bridge because you would still have a dead short on every other half cycle.  The only difference would be that the short was through a diode.  But if such a short did occur, then the protection circuits in the booster would protect both the DCC and the dc sources because they are both being drawn from the same source.  That is a very nice simplification of the dc source.

I wouldn't want these bits of knowledge to be too much like spices - having them burst into flames and smoke inside your head and all ...

Jim


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 13, 2010, 09:20:27 PM
I have a bachmann on30 rail truck due for delivery on Monday it will be my first unit with dcc installed if it has the stop on DC feature I am going to take the plunge and buy a dcc system and give the automation a test run. I have all the parts for the automation circuit in my parts bins. If all goes as expected I will post a picture of the circuit and a list of parts.

NM


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: mabloodhound on March 13, 2010, 09:41:26 PM
Hey, NM, if all goes well, what about posting a video in action?  ;D


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 13, 2010, 10:33:51 PM
Sure I'll post one if all goes well
NM


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 16, 2010, 05:12:20 PM
Well.. Railtrucks lost in the mail. Some how walthers sent it to the wrong house number, they say there's nothing they can do. And want me to reorder it, and they will credit me once it returns to them if ever. Checked page I copied when ordering has my correct address, how is it my fault? First and last time I order from walthers.

Sorry had to rant here sense I was going to experiment with the automation on the rail truck

NM


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: poliss on March 16, 2010, 10:41:21 PM
Write a letter (not email) of complaint to the President and CEO of the company. I usually find that gets results.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 16, 2010, 11:10:36 PM
Yeah that's an old trick I use, I usually mark it personal and confidential.

Anyway back to automation, I didn't want to wait three weeks of shipping time to get the rail truck, so I ordered another from the favoritespot. it was $7.00 cheaper. I'll deal with Walthers when the get the item back.

I have a New Grandson on the way so I am building a small circle layout to go next to his crib, if the automation works it will be installed on that, I just hope I can get it working with an EZ comand system.

This thread has me Chaffing at the bit for DCC, I don't know why the thought of proto automated starts and stops has got me so anxious for Dcc. a couple weeks ago I was saying "Who needs that mess".   

It's so easy to automate DC with just a simple solid state timer and a couple gaps cut in one rail, I hope the affects from the DCC are worth the extra work.

NM


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: NarrowMinded on March 23, 2010, 12:35:48 AM
HI,
I received my Rail Truck, I have the timer circuit put together, I have the "reed" switch in stalled in the Ez Track sections for the stop area. now a couple Questions.

I have the rail truck with the DCC/ACC decoder factory in stalled. Does it have the stop on DC feature?

Is "stop on dc a default setting?

I have not Bought a DCC control system yet, Can I use a EZ Command System to program the "Stop on Dc" feature if needed?

I would like to start cheap for this experiment, if I like DCC I will give the EZ command to my Nephew and upgrade to something better.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now... if the bachmann decoder does not stop and decel  on DC which decoder would be best for this, I will likely put it in my non dcc 2-6-0

I read Jim's post about the Digitrax "Brake generator"  

Can the EZ command program the Brake generator feature?

Or will I need a better programmer?


I'm on a mission to get this done. I'm off to read the Digitrax manual mentioned

NM

Added: read the digitrax manual... looks like I will be buying a digitrax system.


Title: Re: Is There Such a Thing As Automated DCC Operation?
Post by: ABC on March 23, 2010, 12:46:32 AM
I have not Bought a DCC control system yet, Can I use a EZ Command System to program the "Stop on Dc" feature if needed?
I would like to start cheap for this experiment, if I like DCC I will give the EZ command to my Nephew and upgrade to something better.
Can the EZ command program the Brake generator feature?
Or will I need a better programmer?
Added: read the digitrax manual... looks like I will be buying a digitrax system.
Yeah, the E-Z Command cannot do program advanced CVs, Digitrax makes a solid system.