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Discussion Boards => General Discussion => Topic started by: billyb on February 17, 2018, 03:59:02 PM



Title: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: billyb on February 17, 2018, 03:59:02 PM
What is considered the FROG in a turnout.  And why is it called a “frog”?


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Flare on February 17, 2018, 04:05:08 PM
The frog is the middle section of a turnout where the two inner rails overlap.

Wikipedia says its name comes from part of a horse's hoof that closely resembles the component.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch#Frog_(common_crossing)


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: bbmiroku on February 17, 2018, 04:14:10 PM
I always figured it was called a frog so you can say the word that you want to say (when the train derails) in front of children.

"FROOOOOG!!!!!"


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Maletrain on February 19, 2018, 08:09:00 PM
If it had been named in more recent times, when acronyms were in-vogue, maybe it would have been called a TOAD, for Train On Another Direction.  A doubt very many of the acronym guys ever saw the bottom of a horse's foot.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Trainman203 on February 19, 2018, 08:44:07 PM
Or “Built For Derailments”.😱😂


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Ckrails on February 23, 2018, 05:29:55 PM
Because that's where our trains "jump" the tracks?


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: James in FL on February 23, 2018, 10:11:20 PM
 Frog = Friggin' Rail Out of Gauge


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Woody Elmore on March 03, 2018, 01:56:56 PM
There is no overlap in a frog. Basically, two rails meet at an angle. The frog determines the number of a switch - number 6, 8 , etc. They can be fabricated in a shop or cast. New York's Penn Station is undergoing renovation and the job is taking forever because of all the frogs and points that have to be fabricated.

In addition to frogs, rail joiners are called "fishplates."





Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: RAM on March 03, 2018, 07:38:33 PM
In rail terminology, a fishplate, splice bar or joint bar is a metal bar that is bolted to the ends of two rails to join them together in a track. The name is derived from fish, a wooden bar with a curved profile used to strengthen a ship's mast.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: bbmiroku on March 03, 2018, 07:45:41 PM
Fishplates and rail joiners, as far as modelling is concerned are generally two separate things.  Kind of like how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares.

If you want to be really detailed, you can go ahead and solder on some wire on the side of the rails between track sections and not use the railjoiners.  Those railjoiners would be fishplates.  But if you go into a hobby shop and ask for fishplates, you may get some weird looks and directions to an aquarium supply store.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: RAM on March 04, 2018, 10:54:02 PM
You really can buy ho fishplates.  I don't know if you glue them to the rails or what.  They are for people have a lot of money and time.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: bbmiroku on March 04, 2018, 11:18:10 PM
Yuge amounts of time.  I knew they made them for O and up, but I didn't know they made them for HO.  It would probably be cheaper to buy wire, cut it, flatten it, and glue it.  Then put 'rivet' heads on the ends.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Maletrain on March 05, 2018, 11:25:24 AM
They even make fishplates for N scale.  But, they can't be sale thickness. So, putting them on the insides of the rails may cause derailments.  (Putting them anywhere may cause mental issues in this scale.)


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Trainman203 on March 05, 2018, 01:00:24 PM
Fish plates join prototype rail sections together with bolts.  They used to be every 39’.  Welded rail has done away with a lot of them.  HO fish plates are for people who want extreme realism, especially those who go beyond oversized code 100 rail in favor of better sized code 83, 70, or even 55.  You don’t put them everywhere, just where they really show.

Trivia question- why were historic railroad rail sections made in 39’ lengths?


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Len on March 05, 2018, 01:33:52 PM
Trivia question- why were historic railroad rail sections made in 39’ lengths?

Ummmm...So they'd fit on/in a 40' flatcar or gondola.

Len


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Trainman203 on March 05, 2018, 01:36:09 PM
Correct!!!!!!


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: ebtnut on March 05, 2018, 04:37:40 PM
I don't recall the source right now, but rail lengths were a function of "normal" car lengths.  I believe it had to do with having all the weight of a car on one rail instead of the flexation caused by only one end at a time being on the rail.  Rail lengths were 33 feet in the late 19th century, increased to 36 feet in the early 20th, then to 39 feet as the "standard" box cars went from 30 feet to 36 feet to 40 feet.  That stayed pretty much the standard through World War 2.  Then came the introduction of CWR in quarter-mile lengths.  Interestingly, at least in one case I witnessed personally in the 1980's, the rail mill in Steelton, PA (just south of Harrisburg) produced 39 foot rails.  These were shipped about 10 miles north to Conrail's rail welding facility where the short lengths were welded into the 1/4 mile lengths for final track-laying.  Not sure how common that was elsewhere, but it was partly a function of steel mill not wanting, or able, to produce the long rails directly.


Title: Re: “Frog” in turnout
Post by: Ken Clark on March 05, 2018, 08:15:43 PM
  Interesting to note that CWR was in service as early as  1889, the Norfolk and Western had a 3 miles stretch installed. The rail was electric welded and also used on street railways.
  Information from " The Science Of Railways" published in 1903.

  Ken C
   GWN