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| | |-+  Something I noticed about Walthers Cornerstone background buildings
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Author Topic: Something I noticed about Walthers Cornerstone background buildings  (Read 8225 times)
Paul M.

T&P Railway in the 1950s


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« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2007, 06:51:41 PM »

Gene,

Look at some of the background buildings I showed earlier in the post. They'll fit your era.

I've only found 2 background buildings that won't fit the 1950s.

PS- I found another example on the full size kit=background building.

Bud's trucking company:


Lakeville warehousing:
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SteamGene

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« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2007, 07:47:17 AM »

Imust have skipped the correct page on the Walther's catalog.  I've ordered Building #4 which should fit well with a DPM Drywell Ink Company - which will be lettered for DuPont when I find a correctly sized DuPont logo and Moser and Son Sauerkraut and Pickle Plant, coming from the P2K Moore Wharehouse.  The kraut and pickle factory sign was going to be in German, but I figured that the sign would have changed during World War II, just like my school's alma matre got dropped as it is to the same tune as the German National Anthem.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Atlantic Central

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« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2007, 08:11:25 AM »

Gene,

I Knew you would figure it out, especially after Paul posted photos of most of them.

Interesting points about the German language in our culture. Few people today are aware of how strong the German influence was on our culture before the two world wars. if Queen Victoria had not married a German, we would most likely not have Christmas Trees, for example.

While not old enought to have experianced it, with a name like Stroh, it was a matter of family history to know about that change in our culture.

My ancestors came here doing the German revolution, about 1848, as did many from Germany.

German was almost the stste language in Maryland do to the high German Catholic population that came here in the 1700's.

But we all assimilated, something that is needed now, but not happening.

Sheldon
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SteamGene

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« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2007, 11:16:19 AM »

Sheldon,
The Shenandoah Valley still has a large population of Amish, Mennonites, and Brethern in their various degrees of "assimilation."  Especially just south of Harrisonburg, Virginia one may still see horse drawn buggies on the road, often on Sunday at church time.  My wife went to school with a large number of Mennonite girls who arrived and departed in typical Mennonite dresses and bonnets, but headed straight for the girls' bathroom and changed for classes.  Some of them still speak German at home, apparently. 
You are correct in the influence of Germany on the U.S.  Go to Covington, Kentucky where some of the streets in the old part of town are actually called "Strassen" and where there is an almost brand new Hofbrauhaus. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Atlantic Central

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« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2007, 03:28:04 PM »

Gene,

That's good to know. When I move to Smith Mountain Lake, I'll be right at home after growing up in Maryland and spending much time in the nearby Amish country of Lancaster Co, PA.

Another strong German area is central Michigan. I have friends in Frankenmuth, MI. In that town, which has played on their German heritage for tourism, vertually all the children go to Lutheran Schools rather than public schools and the town still does its offical business in German.

Sheldon
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SteamGene

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« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2007, 04:19:06 PM »

Smith Mountain Lake is way south and west of the Pennsylvania Dutch area, which is in the Harrisonburg-Staunton region - (Rockingham-Augusta counties).  Smith Mountain Lake is mostly Scots-Irish like the rest of the valley. 
I spent almost four years in Milwaukee - very German.  Back then we started school with the Lord's Prayer, which confused me at first as they used the Lutheran version and I used the Episcopal version. 
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
Atlantic Central

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« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2007, 04:38:33 PM »

Gene,

I understand, but to a rural guy like me, growing up with nothing close together, the distance between Harrisonburg and SML is just a good streach of the legs, or at least no more than a nice afternoon drive.

Yes Milwaukee too, I've been there, nice place.

Prayer? in school? Watch out the PC police will get you talking about that.

Sheldon
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SteamGene

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« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2007, 05:31:14 PM »

Sheldon,
I-81 is not to be taken lightly.  It is one of the deadliest highways in the U.S.  Mickie and I avoid it whenever possible.
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
RAM

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« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2007, 08:14:14 PM »

Two things that would improve the safty of I-81 is for the drivers to slow down about 20 MPH and drive the speed limit.  The other thing is to fix it.
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