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Author Topic: Who thinks I can do this?  (Read 8166 times)
Joe323

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« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2010, 06:01:28 PM »

I am getting a kick out of reading this thread.  OK so if instead of a circle . you built a treadmill like device where the train runs on a a spool of flexible track. (Like a moving sidewalk but with tracks or groves that simulate the track.) I would think its technologically possible to build.  So the train runs in place while we all yell JANE stop this crazy thing LOL !
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panniertankboy8751


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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2010, 07:35:49 PM »

I am getting a kick out of reading this thread.  OK so if instead of a circle . you built a treadmill like device where the train runs on a a spool of flexible track. (Like a moving sidewalk but with tracks or groves that simulate the track.) I would think its technologically possible to build.  So the train runs in place while we all yell JANE stop this crazy thing LOL !

..........

WHAT?!?!
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Joe323

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« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2010, 08:16:12 PM »

you never saw the Jetsons ?
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az2rail


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« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2010, 08:37:22 PM »

I use to have some O gauge track that was sort of made that way. Still see some at train shows every once and a while.

It could be possible to make it loop like was mentioned as a tank tread. You could put an engine inside it and as the engine move forward, it should force the track to rotate and lay track as it went along. Of course powering it would be a challenge. It could be done though.

Bruce

P.S.- I remember the Jetsons.
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If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either.
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2010, 10:52:10 PM »

I saw something on www.carendt.com a while ago, it was a wheel with the track laid inside so as the loco moved the wheel turned and moved along the ground. If I can find the page I will post it.

NM
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jbsmith


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« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2010, 12:13:36 AM »

Well if you got the time and resources for it..go for it and tell us what happened.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 12:25:15 AM by jbsmith » Logged
Joe323

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« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2010, 02:04:59 PM »

I'm wondering in the real world if they use dynomometers to test locomotives, and then has any one ever modeled it?
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az2rail


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« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2010, 02:54:52 PM »

Yes. Railroads did use dynomometer cars. If you  google "dynomometer car" you will be suprised at all the info you get.

Lionel made a dynomometer car, but it was only a car, all it did was read the track voltage. It did not actually measure how the engine was working.

Bruce
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 03:04:32 PM by az2rail » Logged

If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either.
RAM

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« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2010, 06:57:18 PM »

Here is a review of a  Walthers Dynamometer Car I found on the web.
From:  Ralph Brown <cbq682@xxxx>
Date:  Mon, 23 Apr 2001 11:19:52 -0500

Well I just picked up the new Walthers, HO scale, Burlington dynamometer
car. Its an interesting little gadget. It has a working meter inside
that is visible from one of the side windows on each side of the car.
Inside there is a white post with black hash marks. On one end the
coupler is spring loaded so that when it is pulled, a needle inside
moves next to the hash marks to form a meter. The instructions state
that the meter is set up to read approximately eight ounces of draw bar
pull at full extension. The also instructions state that an "electronic
pack with remote infrared data link" is sold separately, however, an
additional piece of literature states that the item has been canceled
and will not be available. It includes a pattern for large hand grabs
and the number of the appropriate Detail Associates small hand grabs.
Small raised dots in the plastic are provided for drilling holes for
hand grabs. As discussed earlier on the list, the car is painted with a
gray roof and Chinese Red car body with a white stripe along the bottom
of each side. It is labeled "DYNAMOMETER 30". The paint and decals are
clear and crisp. Over all I would say this is a nice model, however, I
feel it is slightly overpriced at $32.98. Just a quick review.

 
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ABC
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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2010, 07:07:44 PM »

Here's a picture of the said walthers car...

Quote
Walthers Part # 932-4651
HO scale, $32.98, sold out at Walthers
Bigger, faster, heavier, better. As new steam locos made their way from the drawing boards to the ready track in the teens and 1920s, and older engines were modernized with new devices, railroads needed a way to accurately measure their performance. The answer was the Dynamometer Car, a specialized rolling railroad laboratory. Equipped with a large dynamometer to measure pulling power, other instruments were added as needed to measure a wide range of data while the engines were working in freight or passenger service. Armed with this information, company engineers provided detailed performance data that increased efficiency and lowered costs. Larger railroads often owned their own cars, and leased them to smaller lines as needed. Engine builders also had dynamometer cars as did some universities with railroad engineering programs. When diesels came, the cars were simply upgraded with the latest equipment and many were in service for decades; some are still in use today!
Now, you can measure the power of your motive power with Walthers all-new, working Dynamometer Car in HO Scale. Based on a typical 1920s era design, it comes fully assembled with on-board measuring equipment to determine pulling power.
Handsomely painted and lettered like the prototypes (An undecorated model is available for you to custom paint in your road's color and lettering scheme.), this car will be a conversation piece in any train. Loaded with add-on details, including a full interior and underbody, the car also has molded starter points to accept standard size wire grab irons (sold separately) if desired.
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