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Author Topic: My articulated loco won't run  (Read 3280 times)
Bruce Moore

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« on: January 16, 2010, 02:05:50 PM »

One day after I had run it for a while, I removed my brass articulated loco from the track and stored it for a month. I returned it to the track, but it would not run.

It was mfd by Hamsungsa of Korea. The tender trucks have connection to  one polarity of the electrical system; the loco trucks provide connection to the other. I cleaned the trucks then checked the electrical connections and polarity, re-established the plug connection between the loco and the tender, yet it refuses to run. Nothing I've done seems to help.

Ideas please.
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BaltoOhioRRfan


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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2010, 02:09:10 PM »

Have you tested another loco on the track to ensure electricity is running through the rails?

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Emily C.
BaltoOhioRRFan
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Bruce Moore

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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2010, 02:21:50 PM »

That's affirmative. The track is on my working layout.
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BaltoOhioRRfan


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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2010, 03:03:30 PM »

might be a loose wire in the tender or locomotive, try placing a lead on the connector (if its like the old rivarossis with a thin wire) and one on the pickups on the loco and see if it runs.
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Emily C.
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Daylight4449


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« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2010, 03:24:29 PM »

or could be a short, i have heard of those developing in brass locos
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Rashputin

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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2010, 07:02:35 PM »

   The main things I've seen on my engines that causes this problem are the drawbar connection being broken either by the spring that is used to press against the tender peg coming unsoldered and therefore not making contact, or the brass brake shoes on older engines being in contact with the drivers.  Since about the mid-seventies most engines started to use plastic brake shoes rather than brass so that's easiest to check first.  The connection to the tender can look like it's OK but not be applying pressure to the peg on the tender, can be still covered with solder where it connects to the wire that goes to the motor but not actually still making contact sufficiently, and several other things that look fine but aren't functional so be sure it is tightly connected at the solder point and making good contact with the tender peg.  After that, you might even check that the tender peg is screwed in well and that it is still soldered to the wires from the tender wheels.  One way or another, the connection between the tender and the engine seem to have been the huge majority of the brass pickup problems I've had.  (tender trucks usually have a peg that won't let you rotate them 180 degrees, but if the engine is old enough you may have rotated them 180 and have them picking up from the same rail as the engine itself is)

  The only other thing that even sticks in my mind is the lead or trailing truck shorting against the frame somehow but that is usually a problem at switches or sometimes on very tight curves.

  Regards
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Chris350
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2010, 05:03:23 AM »

While thinking of polarity, is it possible that one of the tender trucks got reversed so it is creating a short?
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Bruce Moore

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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2010, 09:17:15 PM »

Tks, Rashputin. Good tracing method, but my tender is connected through a fine-wire pair and plug/socket.

Chris350, I'll try taking the tender apart to look, but it's difficult since diabetic neuropathy has drastically reduced feeling in my left fingers and thumb. Holding onto and seating tiny screws, washers,  and nuts is progressively difficult Cry.

Tks again!
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Chris350
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2010, 12:51:58 AM »

you probably don't need to go as far as disassembling the tender, I'm thinking it's a case where one of the trucks is rotated 180 from it's intended orientation.  If it's rotated it ought to be simple to turn it back the way it belongs.  Sometimes it's possible to see the insulation on one end of the axels.  The insulated sends ought to be on the same side, and opposite the engine if I read you op correctly.
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2010, 04:25:29 PM »

It is also possible that you have a non-electrical problem such as a slipping drive.  This is particularly common in locomotives with rubber tubing as couplings between motor and gear drives.  Put an ear close to or right on the locomotive and run up the power.  If you hear the motor running but the locomotive is sitting still, you know what the problem is.

Jim
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Chris350
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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2010, 06:33:14 PM »

after reading gJim's post I think it's also possible the the gearing isn't meshing.  similar to the drive link slipping.
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