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Author Topic: atlas layout"the Central Midland" for my dad  (Read 5422 times)
oompalompa

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« on: January 18, 2010, 01:48:29 PM »

i want to build this table my problem is the book makes no sense Huh? i want to know if any one has built this and took pix as they went? this would be a good way to spend time with my dad. i know this table will take a long time which i was hoping for. any help is greatly apreciated.

teen engineer
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jbsmith


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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2010, 02:55:06 PM »

this a pic of the "central midland" track plan.
Looks complicated.
According to the bill of materials on the atlas website, 4 crossings and about 64 switches plus a pier and girder bridge somplace,
can't really tell in pic below.

https://secure.atlasrr.com/mmMOD1/Images/10029.jpg
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rich1998

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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2010, 03:01:26 PM »

Below are a bunch of links on the particular project that might give you some idea of what you are up against for a first layout.
I will admit, it is a fascinating challenge for son and father. Good luck.

http://www.google.com/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=the+Central+Midland+model+railroad&btnmeta%3Dsearch%3Dsearch=Search+the+Web
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oompalompa

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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2010, 03:10:22 PM »

i own the book with the project but the instructions make no sense at all
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rich1998

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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2010, 03:58:40 PM »

Ok, again, look at the links I provided. This going to take a lot of visualization.
Sounds like you have never built a layout before.
Home work, lots of home work reading though those links and attempting to visualize what people were doing when building this layout.
Very easy to say, Not Plug & Play.
This a long term project.

Lex
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jbsmith


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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2010, 04:02:29 PM »

from lexons earlier posting,,this thread has some photos of the lay out under construction.

http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8141
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oompalompa

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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2010, 04:07:02 PM »

i just read that all i know the tracks gonna take along time that was the whole point. i wanted some thing that would never get boring and easly expandable
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oompalompa

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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2010, 04:28:38 PM »

another good question is wether to use section track or flextrack? this is a list of parts in it. is it cheaper sectional or flex?

H0 Code 100 Bulk Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 9" Straight Track - Bulk     62
H0 Code 100 Bulk Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 18" Radius Track - Bulk     8
H0 Code 100 Bulk Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 22" Radius Track - Bulk     99
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Crossings     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 12 1/2 Crossing     2
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Crossings     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 19 Crossing     2
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Turnouts     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 Mark 3 Wye Turnout     1
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Turnouts     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 #4 Mark 3 Turnout Left     9
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Turnouts     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 #4 Mark 3 Turnout Right     6
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Turnouts     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 #6 Mark 3 Turnout Left     9
H0 Code 100 Custom-Line Turnouts     More Info 
   
Ho Code 100 #6 Mark 3 Turnout Right     7
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 6" Straight Track     4
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 1/3 18" Radius Track     5
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Straight Terminal Track     16
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Terminal Joiners     5
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Bumpers     7
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Rerailers     1
H0 Code 100 Snap-Track Products     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Track Assortment     7
H0 Bridge Piers     More Info 
   
Ho 3" Bridge Piers     2
H0 Bridge Piers     More Info 
   
Ho Pier Girders     1
H0 Bridge Kits     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Deck Bridge Kit     1
H0 Bridge Kits     More Info 
   
Ho-Code 100 Warren Bridge Kit     1
H0 Code 100 Switch Machines     More Info 
   
Ho Remote Switch Machine - Left     18
H0 Code 100 Switch Machines     More Info 
   
Ho Remote Switch Machine - Right     14
H0 Scale Rail Joiners     More Info 
   
Ho Plastic Rail Joiners     3
Electrical Components     More Info 
   
Switch Control Box     26
Electrical Components     More Info 
   
Selector     6
Electrical Components     More Info 
   
Controller     1
H0 Scale Track Nails     More Info 
   
Ho&n-Track Nails     2
H0 Scale Rail Joiners     More Info 
   
Ho Universal Rail Joiners (Nickel Sil.)     1
Electrical Components     More Info 
   
Spade Connectors     1
H0 Layout Books & Planning Tools     More Info 
   
Seven Step By Step Ho Railroads     1
Colored Layout Wire     More Info 
   
Layout Wire - Black 50'     1
Colored Layout Wire     More Info 
   
Layout Wire - Red 50'     1
Colored Layout Wire     More Info 
   
Layout Wire - Green 50'     1
Colored Layout Wire     More Info 
   
Layout Wire - Yellow 50'     1
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rich1998

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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2010, 05:15:57 PM »

Do the math. Ok, more home work. You might make mistakes but we all do that even following others suggestions which some times do not work for us.

Find a couple on line dealers that have good prices.
The more research you do, the more knowledgeable you become wit the ability to help others in the future. Consider this all a learning experience.
I use prefab 36" track and some hand laid track, plus hand laid turnouts. Never tried the small sectional tracks.

Lex
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oompalompa

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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2010, 05:17:21 PM »

thanks alot
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Michigan Railfan


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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2010, 07:31:29 PM »

iwanted some thing that would never get boring

Well, your right about that. Seems like that layout would never get boring. Much better than a simple circle or oval.
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jward


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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2010, 08:13:28 PM »

if i may make a suggestion.....

i would guess that it is the framing and subroadbed directions that you find confusing. if this is so, you may want to checque out the layout oregon pass lines, in the atlas book king size layouts. this one is similar in size and complexity to the central midland, but has complete framing dimensions in the instructions.....

as to the central midland. about half of the subroadbed is plywood, and the other half is pine board. i much prefer the pine board to work with, but it does require alot of pieces cut at odd angles to fit the situation. this is probably where the layout plan gets confusing for you.

while i haven't built this particular layout, i've built many of similar size and construction. this one is best approached step by step, in this order:

1. lay out the basic framework. this is best described as a 5'x12' main table, with a 5'x5' extension. you can build it with 2 12' rails and 5' joists between them. this is slightly different than shown in the plan, but just as workable. the extension is two 5' long rails, with 5' joists between them.


2. once you have this framework assembled, but before you attatch legs, cover the framework with pieces of cardboard if you can find some, assemble your mainline tracks on the cardboard. don't worry about the yard for right now.


3. mark and cut the cardboard along the outside edges of the double track. you will use these sections as templates for the pine board, so be sure to mark where on the layout they go.

4. disassemble the track and set it aside. take your cardboard templatesand start trasnferring them to the pine boards. use at least 1x6 plank for double track, 1x8 is better. try to lay the templates out so that your joints between sections of board lie in between the joists. you can use short sections of pine as splice plates under the joints. it is best to pick a starting point, and work from there laying out the cuts one section at a time. each board will be cut to fit the previous one, with the lines drawn from the templates used to line things up.

5. fasten the boards together and line them up on the framework in the proper position. you can fasten any sections that are at 0 elevation at this time, but do not fasten any others to the framework.

6 attatch the legs, be sure to have the table level as this is critical for the next step



7. set the grade. you can use sections of 1x4 clamped to the joists to raise the pine boards to whatever height is appropriate. you can make a simple tool to set grades by stacking short pieces of 1/4" flat moulding, and usiing them to support one end of a 24" carpenters level. each piece of moulding in the stack corresponds to an increase in the grade of 1%. thus, for a 2% grade, you'd stack 2 pieces of moulding under the level and on your track board. you'd then raise the other end of the board until the level reads level, then fasten the riser underneath the board at the nearest joist. once again, work from the zero point upward, one section at a time.

8.lay your track, being sure to test as you go. start from the lowest point and work upward. it is not easy to lay track underneath something you've covered over.

this should be enough to get you started.....
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Jeffery S Ward Sr
Pittsburgh, PA
pdlethbridge
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« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2010, 01:07:31 PM »

I would use 1/2" plywood on the whole layout as pine may curl or warp as the weather changes, plywood is much more stable. On the curves use a compass to give you the center line for the track. Use code 83NS atlas if you can, but code 100NS is okay. You can use L girder construction, a 1x2 on top of a 1x4 glued and screwed. This lets you screw 1x4s from underneath. Legs could be 2x2's. If the layout is higher then it will be easier to crawl under, and if its lower, you can reach things better but on this layout you will need a couple of pop up access holes which means higher is better. My brothers layout is based on this plan and it was built 20+ years ago and it still runs great, Code 100 Nickel Silver track and switchmaster switch motors. Any questions you have I will be glad to help.  Paul
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 06:07:36 AM by pdlethbridge » Logged
Jhanecker2

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« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2010, 08:14:20 PM »

If you are worried about expansion & contraction of the wooden members you might want to consider applying a coat of varnish to the bench work after you have finished to seal the wood work from moisture. By gaps are you talking about small gaps in the rail sections properly held by the rail clips or rails unsupported by ties but otherwise connected ? If you had to remove some of the ties to install the clips properly you can replace the ties after removing the top plates & glueing the ties beneath.  J2.
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