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Author Topic: Switch track  (Read 4776 times)
Michael T.


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« on: April 02, 2010, 01:12:27 PM »

Where can I get Ho scale switch track that does not need power so I can just push the switch track instead of having a motor do it? This way I do not need a ton of power supplies.
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James Thomas

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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2010, 01:30:47 PM »

1.  You would probably get more replies if you posted this question on the HO board.

2.  You don't need a "ton" of power packs to power turn outs.  Often there is an accessory terminal on your power pack.  Or a cheap walwart will power turnouts.

3.  Bachmann EZ Track turnouts have a black button you can slide manually to change routes.

4.  Other manufacturers sell manual turnouts.  You can also buy hand throws to help change routes on manual turnouts.

5.  If you have a local hobby shop, go there and ask for options.

Hope this helps.
-JRT
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ABC
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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2010, 01:50:24 PM »

What brand track are you using and is it code 100 or 83?
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OldTimer


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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2010, 02:41:24 PM »

If free is inexpensive enough for you, you can make a "switch machine" out of a paper clip. 

Most turnouts have a nail hole in a tie between the throw bar and that end of the turnout.  If not, you can drill one.  There is also a hole in the middle of the throw bar.  Eyeball the distance between those two holes (roughly 1/2 inch on an Atlas #4).  Eyeball the thickness of the tie strip (maybe 1/16 inch).  You're going to make a spring, each end of which goes in one of the holes we talked about above.  Cut a piece of paper clip so that it is the length between the two holes plus twice the depth of the tie strip plus about an 1/8 to a 1/4 inch.  In our example that would be roughly 3/4 to 7/8 inch.

Using a pair of needle nose pliers, bend the two ends down 1/16".  These two little legs will go into the nail hole and throw bar.  Put a bend into the middle of the wire so that when you look down on it, it makes a shallow V.  Adjust that V until the little legs fit into the holes.  The length of the wire determines how strong the spring is.  You want just enough springiness to keep the points pushed solidly against the stock rails.  If the legs are too long and stick out below the ties, you can dress them with a file. 

To throw the turnout, just flip a point rail with your finger.  Good luck and have fun.  Once you've made a couple of these, it becomes very easy.

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pipefitter


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« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2010, 03:08:55 PM »

If free is inexpensive enough for you, you can make a "switch machine" out of a paper clip ...

That's got to be one of the greatest little tips I seen on this board Cheesy Thanks!

Robert
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OldTimer


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« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2010, 09:30:24 AM »

You're welcome, Robert.  These really do work well...so well, in fact, that you'll discover that there really isn't any rush to replace them with "real" machines.
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Michael T.


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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2010, 10:53:26 AM »

So they really do not "sell" manual switch track?
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ABC
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2010, 10:58:04 AM »

So they really do not "sell" manual switch track?
What brand track are you using and is it code 100 or 83?
If you let me know what the code and brand of your track is, then I can tell you what your options are...as far as manual turnouts go.
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Michael T.


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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2010, 11:02:56 AM »

Where on the track can I find the brand number?
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Michael T.


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« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2010, 11:38:00 AM »

Well the brand of the track is bachmann. It is E-Z track.  This is the track. I do not know where you get the code number.

http://www.internetrailroad.com/images/bachmann/EZ_44411-large.jpg
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ABC
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2010, 11:43:21 AM »

Where on the track can I find the brand number?
I didn't ask for a brand number. I asked for the manufacturer and I asked for the code, in HO scale it is usually either code 83 or code 100, but occasionally it is code 70. The code is the height of the rails.
And just as a side note I think you have to be 13 to use the forum.

Okay, so you have E-Z track, all Bachmann E-Z Track is code 100.
Now my next question is would you be opposed to using code 100 track with a cork roadbed cut to mesh with the E-Z track? If not then your options are much more limited.
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Michael T.


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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2010, 11:46:14 AM »

I do not know what a cork roadbed is. (sorry)
« Last Edit: April 03, 2010, 11:50:31 AM by Michael T. » Logged

I finally started on building my first layout!!!
ABC
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« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2010, 11:50:18 AM »

The only way to obtain manual Bachmann turnouts that do not come with the ability to be powered is the E-Z track expander set. But, Atlas and Model Power offer cheap manual turnouts in code 100 so, as long as you can put roadbed under the track to make it the same height as the E-Z track, they'll do fine.
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Michael T.


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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2010, 11:55:41 AM »

What is a roadbed? (Sorry I am new to this)
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ABC
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« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2010, 12:47:01 PM »

Cork Roadbed goes underneath the track, after you place this under the track you should ballast the track and then nail it down or otherwise affix the track.


I guess the easy solution for an inexperienced modeler is to buy standard Bachmann remote turnouts and not power them and just use the little slider on the side.
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