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Author Topic: 4-6-0 rod replacement  (Read 2918 times)
rye

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« on: May 09, 2010, 06:41:58 PM »

hi
how do i  get the side rods from the maim wheels on a 4-6-0 engine off the cap justs turns i need to replace the bottom end and before i order it i want to know, thanks rye
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dgtrrco

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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2010, 08:42:22 PM »

RYE!!! What 4-6-0 do you have? Is it the one with the little GREY pins holding the side rods on or the ANNIE with the small metal silver six sided screw? The first one mentioned is just pry-ed off carefully not breaking the pin holding it in. The second just unscrews. Hope this helps.  GENE





DGTRRCO
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rye

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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2010, 09:17:10 PM »

hi
it has a grey cap on it i need to remove it to get the rod to replace the bottom unit i didnt order this from bachmann yet until i get  it off with out breaking it thanks
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Loco Bill

Model Railroading since 1947


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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2010, 11:34:33 PM »

It just pry's off,  I have used a medium side cutter slipping the jaws gently under the pin to get an even lift,  I just gently apply up pressure and push the cutters in further as the pin comes up whuke wiggling it a bir.

Good luck
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Loco Bill,
Roundhouse Foreman
Missouri Western Railway

Unnofficial Historian of Bachmann Large Scale Products
rye

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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2010, 08:15:54 AM »

hi guys ,
i got it, now to order the new bottom end ,the old one had more damage then i thought, some one drop it and didnt tell me  Shocked Huh? Sad  thanks for the help again, rye
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2010, 05:16:47 PM »

Losing, breaking, or accidentally cutting the pins in half while taking them out with side cutters - no problem.  Just tap the hole for a #6-32 machine screw.  Added benefit - easy to remove the next time.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
Barry BBT

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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2010, 02:27:24 AM »

Jim,

I would suggest a 5-40 tap and hex head bolt.  I buy them in bulk from Micro Fasteners.  So have them available - CHEAP.

Barry - BBT
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There are no dumb questions.
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2010, 03:45:24 PM »

I'll have to try a 5-40 next time.  I started using 6-32's before I had a 5-40 tap and just kept on doing it.

One thing I am wondering, though.  What is the difference between a machine screw and a bolt?

Jim
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Barry BBT

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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2010, 05:48:15 PM »

Jim,

I think they are the same.

My problem is confusing just a screw with a bolt or machine screw.

Barry - BBT
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There are no dumb questions.
Udo

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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2010, 08:28:59 PM »

Hello Jim, Hello Barry !
Take it easy, I think, there are no differences between bolts and screws.
In the engineering sector, most people talk about bolts. That means "screws" with a bigger diameter (e.G. M20, M 30 and higher).
Bolts also may not have a head, that means they are fixed on both ends with a nut.
The difference also may be, that some bolts have threads only at the ends, the middle is without.
But to talk about this, is close to philosophy !
Let's say, in our hobby, we use screws, the originals have just bolts !

Udo
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Udo

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« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2010, 10:46:12 PM »

Hello Jim, Hello Barry !
This is from WIKIPEDA:
Differentiation between bolt and screw
A universally accepted distinction between a screw and a bolt does not exist. The Machinery's Handbook describes the distinction as follows:[2]
A bolt is an externally threaded fastener designed for insertion through holes in assembled parts, and is normally intended to be tightened or released by torquing a nut. A screw is an externally threaded fastener capable of being inserted into holes in assembled parts, of mating with a preformed internal thread or forming its own thread, and of being tightened or released by torquing the head. An externally threaded fastener which is prevented from being turned during assembly and which can be tightened or released only by torquing a nut is a bolt. (Example: round head bolts, track bolts, plow bolts.) An externally threaded fastener that has thread form which prohibits assembly with a nut having a straight thread of multiple pitch length is a screw. (Example: wood screws, tapping screws.)
This distinction is consistent with ASME B18.2.1 and some dictionary definitions for screw[3][4] and bolt.[5][6][7]
The issue of what is a screw and what is a bolt is not completely resolved with Machinery's Handbook distinction, however, because of confounding terms, the ambiguous nature of some parts of the distinction and usage variations.[clarification needed] Some of these issues are discussed below:
Machine screws 
ASME standards specify a variety of "Machine Screws"[8] in diameters ranging up to 0.75 in. These fasteners are often used with nuts and they are often driven into tapped holes. They might be considered a screw or a bolt based on the Machinery's Handbook distinction. In practice, they tend to be mostly available in smaller sizes and the smaller sizes are referred to as screws or less ambiguously as machine screws, although some kinds of machine screws can be referred to as stove bolts.

 Grin Grin Grin
Udo
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