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Author Topic: Soldering supplies  (Read 5833 times)
richg
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« on: June 11, 2010, 12:57:37 PM »

Here is what I have been using for soldering for sometime. The solder is 1/32 inch diameter rosin core solder. I sometimes use a little rosin flux.
The tip cleaner helps keep the tip cleaner a little longer. I never use a file to clean the tip as the tips on many soldering irons are plated.
The Weller WLC100 was $24.95 sometime ago but is higher now.
I use max heat with the wedge tip for soldering feeders to the rail and 50 percent setting for the conical tip for DCC and PC board work.
I use an old Weller gun for soldering feeders to the buss wires.

I can do as well with a cheap pencil type but have to use a lot of tip cleaner to keep the tip clean.
When I had a older soldering iron that did not have a plated  tip, a lot of filing was needed at times.
I just like the advantages of the variable solder station.




Rich
« Last Edit: June 11, 2010, 01:46:08 PM by richg » Logged
jonathan


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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 01:34:39 PM »

That is a nice set up.

I find soldering something that is absolutely necessary, but it is my least favorite activity.

I went to Radio Shack.  For around $9 US I bought a soldering kit which included the pencil-type iron (heats up to around 700 deg F), a stand for the iron, a heat sink clip, a prep tool and a small coil of rosin core solder.  Since the solder melts at around 320 deg F, the iron makes for quick work, which is good when soldering track joints.  I also picked up a small tin of flux and a large coil of rosin core solder. 

I use an old, soggy sponge in a bowl to clean the tip.  The tip is removable and can be replaced with a fine point tip for a couple bucks, if I ever want to do soldering on a circuit board.  Don't plan on that, but who knows?

Regards,

Jonathan
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2010, 06:43:38 PM »

Is mine a little over the top?  It gets the job done but is real tricky on the small stuff.
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richg
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2010, 07:10:54 PM »

Is mine a little over the top?  It gets the job done but is real tricky on the small stuff.


Yeah, could be a problem with small stuff.  Wink

Rich
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ABC
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2010, 08:14:14 PM »

Is mine a little over the top?  It gets the job done but is real tricky on the small stuff.
As a side note Summit Racing Equipment Headquarters is a half an hour drive away from me, it is in Tallmadge, OH, Northeast of Akron, Southwest of Cuyahoga Falls, Northwest of Youngstown.
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2010, 09:20:08 PM »

I love drag racing!
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2010, 09:05:15 AM »

It took me six months of saving, but I bought this induction soldering station and love it. While it is pricey, it does an outstanding job of soldering track, wires and brass.
Check out the Micro Mark website for more information on the American Beauty soldering station. I have the tweezer tips - but 'paddle' tips are also available.

Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
lescar

New and jumping in with both feet, up to neck.


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« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2010, 11:06:28 AM »

Is mine a little over the top?  It gets the job done but is real tricky on the small stuff.

Just a tad Shocked , it works great for building metal bench work.  Grin


It took me six months of saving, but I bought this induction soldering station and love it. While it is pricey, it does an outstanding job of soldering track, wires and brass.

Ray
   

Nice set-up.  Cool  I'm using a Weller EC-2000 with a 1/8 and 1/16 chisel tip, and a Weller D-550 Soldering gun for the bus wire.

Les
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All Comments and suggestions are all ways welcome and appreciated
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2010, 01:16:11 PM »

I use a weller for most things but after a little practice I find my Cold heat battery powered unit to work perfect on  circuit board work, it does take a little getting used to but works best on the tiny connections and produces proffesional looking results.

NM
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glennk28

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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2010, 09:39:37 PM »

Well--I use or have used just about all that equipment--Is the "Summit" unit a resistance soldering unit?  My resistance unit is the heavy-duty HotTip from PBL.  With it I can solder a series of O Scale pipe fittings without loosening the adjacent parts, ot solder a compound air pump onto a boiler.    I also use an assortment of solders with different melting points-using the highest first for the bigger joints, then the lower ones for smaller joints.  I have scratchbuilt, kitbuilt, and re-detailed many locomotives in brass over the last fifty years.  I like the permanence of soldered brass.
glenn joesten
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2010, 12:23:47 AM »

The Summit unit shown is a MIG welder for body work and other light steel work.  I had considered at one time buying the TIG equivalent for joining aluminum rails but that got vetoed in favour of a new couch.

I suppose in the very broadest sense you could called them resistance units (the resistance being that of ionized gas) and the TIG can be used for soldering, either hard soldering (silver brazing) or even soft soldering.  With the right techniques, you can even solder such difficult to solder materials as aluminum and white metals when you need to avoid the distortion caused by fusion welding.

Jim 
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glennk28

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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2010, 02:25:02 AM »

That's a bit beerfy even for O Scale.  gj
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2010, 02:36:37 AM »

Here I am, hard at work installing a micro sunami in my 0-6-0t
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2010, 02:56:34 AM »

Pdlethridge,
 that's ridiculous... I don't see any heat sinks in the photo you might wreck that unit. Grin
Good thing they have that great warranty.

NM
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pdlethbridge
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« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2010, 06:20:25 AM »

My wife hates it when I use the kitchen table. Grin There is a sink in the kitchen, is that okay?
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 06:47:14 AM by pdlethbridge » Logged
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