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Author Topic: Timber Trestle  (Read 12067 times)
mf5117

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« on: November 28, 2010, 08:36:36 PM »

Was looking and trying to get some ideas for building scratch built Timber Trustles . And came across this template . Having a hard time figuring size and scale . Image said large scale Trustle template and was wondering if it was pretty close .

Redards :Mark f

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Doneldon

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« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2010, 04:01:43 AM »

5117-

This trestle is a little more than 14" high, depending on how high the first cross member is above the ground .  Its height in scale will depend on the scale you use.  Forexample, it would be about 39' in 1:32 scale (the "smallest" large scale), about 30" tall in 1:24 (Marklin) and about 28' in 1:20.3 (narrow gauge). I've rounded these numbers to the nearest whole foot.  You can figure them out exactly by multiplying the actual height of the trestle from ground to top of top cross member by the scale you are using, one of the above or one of the many other large scales which people use.

Good luck with your modeling.
                                                                                                                                               -- D

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glennk28

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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2010, 09:22:43 PM »

Black Bear  Construction makes plexiglas jigs for building trestles in several  scales--you might try them for what they may have.  gj
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Nathan

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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2010, 10:21:46 PM »

I have used the Black Bear jigs in several scales, well worth the money.
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mf5117

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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 10:41:52 PM »

Thanks for the info I will look for a link on them . I have a couple of friends that work at a water plant and have some access to some ruff redwood ,I was looking at using . In the post and picture ,I was going to cut them to length from the top down for height .don't really need but 8 to 10 inches . Then either give them a basting of paint and sealer or use the redwood ,but I dont really want to use brads due to they rust and then fall apart ove time I figured . I wish there was a way to mortis and tinnen them . But I would be until 2015 building them .
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Sleeping Bear

A genuine ALCOholic


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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2010, 12:19:26 AM »

 liquid nails my man...liquid nails....Later all S.B.
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"If at first you don't succeed....Get a bigger hammer"
Kevin Strong


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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2010, 01:45:36 AM »

The brads (from an air-powered brad nailer) rust, but they don't fall out. (Neither do Atlas track nails.) In fact, the rust does a fair job of holding them in place. (The liquid nails or Titebond II wood glue helps as well.) I use Titebond II and a small air-powered pin nailer. The pins are smaller than brads, but don't have heads so they don't show up. The pins I use are copper (or copper coated), so they don't rust.

Later,

K
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Doneldon

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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2010, 03:19:54 AM »

5117-

You can use the ratios in my previous post to obtain the exact s
izes you need.  Also, consider stainless steel nails.  They are
expensive but they'll stand up to the weather for just about forever.
 
                                                                               -- D
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mf5117

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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2010, 08:52:27 AM »

After looking at the Black Bear site all I saw was Z.N.HO,S and O .And also said they have stop construction .Unless I missed something I didn't see where they made G or Large scale jigs or template's . Could you give me a link if there is another .

regards: mark f    5117

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StanAmes


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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2010, 09:26:41 AM »

A good site for desiging and building trestles is

http://members.cox.net/sn3nut/trestles%20part%201.htm

We purched a pinner and use stainless steel pins.  Use it along with Titebond 3 to build our wood bridges.

We build Jigs as we need them.

Works very well.

Stan Ames
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Loco Bill Canelos

Model railroading since 1947


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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2010, 03:43:04 PM »

I have had minor issues with Titebond II, but trestles constructed with Titebond III have held up best.  I cut all my lumber on my table saw, and use the special "black" ashphalt besed fence paint available at Tractor  Supply Stores.  It is like creosote, and looks ok, unless you like the look of natural wood.
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Loco Bill,  Roundhouse Foreman
Colorado & Kansas Railway Missouri Western Railway
Semi Official Historian; Bachmann Large Scale
There are no dumb or stupid questions, just questions!
smcgill


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« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2010, 08:06:19 AM »

Cedar / type bond III / pin brads are the way to go!  Roll Eyes
I cut up old cedar fencing ( free )   Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
Thompson waterseal was used @ one point but the newer versions it was not used on, no diff. noticed!
Sean
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JerryB

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« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2010, 11:32:55 AM »

I do essentially the same: Redwood, Titebond III, and 23ga. pins driven using a Grex brand pneumatic pinner.

I get scrap redwood (free) from a local lath mill. I also cut up salvaged material. Small, tight grain is preferable.

Titebond II is only 'water resistant.' Titebond III is 'water proof.'

I use the regular steel pins. They rust when in place, which increases their holding power. Stainless steel pins don't have as much 'grip' in the wood. In actuality, the pins only hold the joint while the glue dries. The glue is what keeps the joint together over the years.

Some of my retaining wall cribbing and trestle bents have been in place around 20 years. Can't remember a failure.

Happy (well joined) RRing,

Jerry
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Sequoia Pacific RR in 1:20 / 70.6mm
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artkent

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« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2010, 04:00:10 PM »

For some good info on Trestles go to the "RGS Technical Page" and click on Vol 1,#1 Bridges.  Also other good info there.
Art
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willis

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« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2010, 10:30:24 PM »

mf5117
check with www.trainbuildings.com, Michael Neibaum is a real nice guy to deal with.
he has jigs for any size trestle and cedar wood of any sizes needed.
he has building material also.
willis.
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