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Author Topic: "S"ing the layout  (Read 2353 times)
hminky
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« on: June 24, 2007, 05:32:45 PM »

My two loves in modeling are S scale and the 1870's. Glad I finally realized it is possible to do both. S is the perfect layout scale. All those grossly oversize scenery textures that plague HO layouts are the right size for S and all those texture layers required by O scale can be omitted.

Have made progress in converting the On30 layout to Sn3.5

Got the cribbing in for the pump shed and boiler. That is our 4-4-0 merge with a S scale cab under construction



Narrowed the roads and installed the new tunnel portal



It is nice to be over my "layout block" and working on the layout. I have stared at the layout for three years and could never get started on the O scale oil transfer facility.

Harold
« Last Edit: June 24, 2007, 05:34:34 PM by hminky » Logged
SteamGene

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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2007, 06:05:47 PM »

Interesting convert, Harold.  So HO track is the same gauge as Sn3.5, or 42 inches between the tops of the rails?  Who used that gauge, not that it matters?
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
hminky
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2007, 06:22:09 PM »

3-1/2 foot gauge was the predominate idea for early narrow gauge. The first common carrier narrow gauge, not a converted horse tramway like the Festinog, was implemented by Carl Pihl in Norway in 1862. The British empire introduced 3-1/2 foot gauge into India in the early 1860's, thus it became the "British Imperial Gauge". New Zealand is 3-1/2 foot gauge and many model in Sn3.5. Candada had several 3-1/2 foot gauge railroads most notably the Newfondland Railway.

The Philadelphia and Atlantic City railroad in New Jersey was 3.5 foot gauge in the 1870's and that is the pretext of the Pacific Coast Air Line Railway being 3.5 in the 1870's. It works in S scale because HO is approximately 3/4 S and 3.5 is 3/4 of 56.5 standard gauge. It allows the use of HO equipment conversions with out looking like silly caricatures found in On30.

 Visit:

http://www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/s_scale/

Thank you if you visit
Harold
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2007, 06:43:57 PM »

Looking real good Harold!
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Feel like a Mogul.
Matthew Ginkel


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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2007, 07:31:02 PM »

looks great, but you dont seem to stay in one scale for long  Smiley , I suggest hon3 next  Grin
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hminky
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« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2007, 07:49:15 PM »

looks great, but you dont seem to stay in one scale for long  Smiley , I suggest hon3 next  Grin

I have always been an S scaler I just needed the 1870's equipment which can now be extrapolated from HO. Everthing else was a prelude to where I am now.

HOn3, been there done that.

Harold
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VirginiaCentral

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« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2007, 01:58:11 PM »

Interesting convert, Harold.  So HO track is the same gauge as Sn3.5, or 42 inches between the tops of the rails?  Who used that gauge, not that it matters?
Gene

Hi Gene, Jerry again.  One 42" gauge RR was the Big Sandy & Cumberland.  It was a logging road that ran from a connection with the N&W at Devon, WV to Grundy, VA.  The N&W purchased the BS&C in the '30s and converted it to standard guage to access coal deposits in the area.  About one half of the orriginal ROW was kept in the process.  The west was relocated to create better grades for the standard gauge line.  The N&W Historical Society has a series of articles on the BS&C in their recent magazines.

Jerry
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Jerry Kay
Big Sandy & Cumberland Garden Railroad
Virginia Central & New River Railway & Navigation Co.
"I love the smell of coal smoke in the morning!"
Royce Wilson

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« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2007, 02:29:54 PM »

 :)Harold when I was in HOn3 I milled box cars from wood blocks and then covered them with scribbing and grab irons and such. the only problem is the doors are permnantely shut, but it makes for quick house cars and you can make them any length. they also do not need any added weight.

there was also numerous 42" railroads in the south and loads of logging companies and please don't forget the Canadians!

good luck with your S scale 1870's......Royce Wink Cheesy
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