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Author Topic: Making a Cannery from a prototype (2 pics)  (Read 2623 times)
engineerkyle

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« on: June 27, 2007, 08:37:09 AM »

Hi guys,

I'm about half-way finished with my latest piece. This time I am purposely  gaining inspiration from a real 1:1 structure. That's a first for me.

THE PROTO




FOAMCORE FRAME



SOME SIDING AND DETAIL STARTED




PRIMED





Any ideas on the final color? Thoughts on the sagginhg porch roof?

THANKS.

EK
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SteamGene

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« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2007, 04:39:48 PM »

barn red.  For the sagging roof - do you want it to sag - would that be the right shape for the building you have in mind?
Gene
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Chief Brass Hat
Virginia Tidewater and Piedmont Railroad
"Only coal fired steam locomotives"
r.cprmier

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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2007, 06:15:33 PM »

This building was done very well, from planning to execution to rough finish.  Why don't you look at some of the sites around this hobby where you can find some ideas for your roof sag.  Go to South River Models's site, as well as Sierra models, and Foscale.  Also, look around at your own surroundings for ideas.
I saw a "sag" today I never thought would exist" :  I was on I-95 south in Bridgeport this morning, and reflecting on what a shadow of itself what  once was this city; when I saw a brick building, about 6 stories high, with a sag in the roof fron each end, to the midsection, and the building had accomplished this all byself  simply by settling!

Rich 
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
JerryB

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« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2007, 07:25:24 PM »

EK:

Very nice capture and selective compression of a unique prototype manufacturing facility. And very nice model work. Looking forward to seeing it completed. Looks like you already have a spur ready to service it. Notice that the prototype's RR spur seems to have been removed. In fact, it looks like the prototype facility is abandoned.

Note that the sagging roof follows the curve of the partial wall that is holding it up. If you wanted to make it look like the prototype, you might consider putting a curve in your beam. If plastic, try warm bending it. If wood, you can either curve it or cut a slightly curved one from wider stock.

I doubt that the roof sagged when built. Since you appear to be modeling the building in an earlier time when it was 'in operation', it might be that it is well maintained and / or earlier in its life when the roof didn't sag. In fact, that roof might be a later addition and the space on your model might be something more important: Parking for a a couple of foreground period model cars belonging to the cannery boss and rich farmers / customers? Loading dock for truck deliveries from farms?

Hope this helps,

Happy RRing,

Jerry
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2007, 09:17:45 PM »

I keep going back and forth with this model, looking at it; saying that you did a great job. 
Now, as Jerry infers; here is where the good can become award-winning, depending where you go from here.  I forgot to mention-and i don't know if you have heard if him-but there is a guy named Scott Mason, and he has a website, www.scottymason.com.  THis guy is a pro model builder with a wealth of good info.  You may want to go there to check it out.

RIch
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
Craig

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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2007, 09:48:08 PM »

Nice work, Kyle. Impressive, as always. How do the posts on the porch scale out?

Rich,

The photo gallery at www.scottymason.com features some very impressive structure building. I couldn't help thinking, though, that he might benefit greatly from meeting with Harold Minkwitz, and vice versa. Harold's eye for weathering and landscape details combined with Scott's affinity for structure building could result in some truly remarkable modeling.

Personally, I’d like to have just a tenth their talent. That would advance my skill level ten fold.

Craig
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engineerkyle

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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2007, 08:46:33 AM »

Nice work, Kyle. Impressive, as always. How do the posts on the porch scale out?

Not quite as bad as it looks. If I remember the proto, the posts were painted 2" black pipe.

I had some supports laying around from a Cornerstone kit. Quite heavy, but what you can't see is the cross-section on them is an "L" About what you'd get if you joined a 4x4 to a 4x6 post. I imagine you can tell that I eyeball alot of stuff. If I started measuring, it would be too much like work! Cheesy

I'll post again, with color and up close, when I've worked some more.

EK

ps. Thank's for the kind words and the website. Wondrous stuff!
« Last Edit: June 28, 2007, 08:50:25 AM by engineerkyle » Logged
Bojangle
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2007, 02:07:15 AM »

I like the sagging roof.  They didn't have building codes back then. 

Really nice work,Kyle.  I have been taking pictures of local industries, it does help to have a model.  I found some unfinished doll houses and kits  at a yard sale, lots of good material to work with.  I'm also glad I didn't sell my balsa inventory.

Bo   
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r.cprmier

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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2007, 09:08:47 PM »

Craig;
If you want a real hoot, gotto Scott's site, and read "the diary" of the reconstruction of Jim Diegnan's layout.  Scott is every bit as good a writer as he is a modeller.

Rich
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Rich

NEW YORK NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RR. CO.
-GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN!
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