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Author Topic: No room of a layout.  (Read 12759 times)
rogertra


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« Reply #30 on: July 22, 2011, 07:40:38 PM »

CNE-

I can believe that EZ Track looks great if it has added ballast and weathering, especially if one is trying to represent main line track. And it wouldn't need much ballast since the whole contour is already there. One question, though: Would dilute white glue or wood glue stick tightly to the plastic roadbed?                                                                                                                                -- D


As I wrote on the "HO" forum, no matter what you do to EZ Track and it's competitors, it will still look like EZ Track.  The most realistic track on the market is Micro Engineering's code 50, 70 and 80 weathered track.  None of the set track brands, by any manufacturer,  come close.  If you want scale and realistic looking track you need curves of around 30 inch radius, a quality brand code 80 or less flex-track or hand-laid track, number six or number five in a pinch switches and scale ballast.

I realise that not all of us have space for 30" curves so in that case, we do the best we can and live with the results.
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Terry Toenges


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« Reply #31 on: July 23, 2011, 12:11:49 AM »

The track mounted on foam sounds like a neat idea.
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jsmvmd

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« Reply #32 on: July 23, 2011, 08:58:46 AM »

Dear Ray,

I should have stated the moveable layout will be G scale, since I have a WF set and an Aristo Sesame St. set with a 2-4-2 Rogers and slope backed tender.  Both run very well.  In my small abode, following the DEE-vorce there is limited space. When we shared the Border Collie, the 3 chillen and dog would romp, and the stuff would fly !  I usually get bored with a permanent layout, thus want to do something that I can modify at whim.  The HO modules from various manufactures intrigue me, but do not have that much storage.

Best Wishes, Jack
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #33 on: July 23, 2011, 10:49:39 AM »

Hi All - I have to take the Road Superintendant shopping for food; but I thought I'd write now whilst I had the chance. Don - I did a comparison between a Peco #4 Insulfrog turnout vs a Bachmann remote turnout of the same number. The Peco turnout is $22.49 MSRP and the Bachmann #4 remote is $37.00 MSRP. While the Bachmann unit does appear to be a lot more expensive one must keep in mind that the Peco unit still requires some sort of actuating device (for remote operation - making it similar to the EZ-track unit) as well as a cork (or whatever) roadbed pad. As they 'come out of the box' there is a difference of $14.51. I doubt one can purchase both roadbed and switch motor (@ MSRP) for this amount...at best they would probably come in about the same.

Jack - Holy Macaroni...a G-scale indoor layout would be something to behold! I have seen small, switching G-scale layouts that are quite small. Carl Arendt has a very small G-scale layout on p. 22 of his book. The problem with these layouts is that they will not hold the interest of your young runners...too much thinking and too little 'action'.

Smaller modules could be stored behind/under furniture...or is that where you keep your other 'stuff'? [Can you tell that I was single in the distant past?] Again, good luck with the project.

Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
Doneldon

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« Reply #34 on: July 23, 2011, 06:49:38 PM »

CNE-

Yes, turnouts are likely to be close in price when you figure the whole installed package. Turnouts with remotes attached might be a bit cheaper than turnouts plus third-party switch machines, but not by much. There seem to be quite a few posts about the EZ Track turnout problems on these boards. I haven't experienced any myself other than one issue which was clearly due to my installation, not a manufacturing defect, so I can't fault EZ Track turnouts from personal experience. Too, I only have about 15 which really isn't enough to get an accurate impression on reliability.

The biggest cost savings will be on straight and curved sectional track versus flex track and cork or other roadbed. Flex track enables effortless easements and custom curves which are big advantages from my point of view. You can do easements with EZ Track but only by using a short section of flex track and separate roadbed which is enough more of a hassle that I expect few people actually do it. And custom curves are out with EZ Track unless, again, one puts in a flex track section.
                                                                                  -- D
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2011, 10:33:47 AM »

I hear you Don. The only place I use EZ-track is on my workbench as a locomotive cleaning/testing station. After being in the hobby for over 50 years (of course I like to lie about my age), I have found Peco track components to be of the highest quality of those products I have used. I also understand Micro Engineering products are of high quality as well...'never have used their products.

Conversely, set track (such as EZ-track et. al.) definitely have their place. In days of yore we all used Atlas Snap Track (brass of course) because most of us didn't have the desire, or ability, to hand lay our track (I can only imagine how the average 12-year old would be at hand laying track). Products, like EZ-track are great for younger railroaders or temporary layouts (such as holiday pikes). You are right...it is hard to beat flex track (more so now that it no longer has fiber tires that are stapled to brass rail)...but products, such as EZ-track, have their place and uses as well.

Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
Doneldon

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« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2011, 05:35:33 PM »

CNE-

I think we are of similar vintage. I had Lionel trains as a boy and in 1959 my brother and I switched to HO where I've stayed other than a foray into large scale which supplemented HO but did not supplant it. (I've been wanting to use that phrasology for a long time.)

I agree with your assessment of set tracks. But I find EZ Track to be great for kids; in fact, I built a layout for my youngest grandson with EZ Track. For my own use I have Code 83 Shinohara. I'm looking to add some HOn3 but haven't decided yet what track to use. I'd like to have some dual-gauge track but I don't want to use Code 83 for the narrow gauge and I don't want to use Code 70 for the HO. So I'm trying to figure that out.
                                                                                                                                               -- D
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2011, 07:32:03 PM »

Last week, I gave a talk on building model railroads at a kids' summer camp.  I took along a 3-1/2' x 6' piece of of Styrofoam "beadboard" that had been painted green, an arm load of E-Z Track, a couple of trains, and a mess of accessories such as buildings, trees, people, animals, etc.  I mostly chatted with the kids, 9 and 10 year old boys and girls, while they built the railroad.  We talked about what we needed on our model railroad and about the significance of railroading in the real world.  Because we did this in a museum, it seemed appropriate to have a late 1800's theme - steam locomotives, false front buildings, etc. - and even the kids who have trains at home learned a new concept - modeling a particular time.  We all had a lot fun and ended up with a pretty decent looking layout considering 15 kids will come up with 15 ways to do things.

The 2" beadboard was plenty strong and while green paint didn't make a finished landscape, it did allow us to move the track around quite easily.  The E-Z Track was a natural - the kids were able to put it together themselves and it stayed together while we all took turns running trains.  The track had been "broken in" by being assembled and taken apart a number of times before.  In its other life, it is my test and break-in track that I set up as needed.  Whenever I get help setting up a track, whether from kids or adults, I like to run a Kleenex around the track before we run a train, ostensibly to remove the dust, but it is also a chance to check that all the rails are inside rail joiners and none are sitting on top of them.  Bottom line, I could see building a layout with beadboard and E-Z Track and only when I am happy with how it can be operated, gluing down the E-Z Track and start carving the foam.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
mf5117

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« Reply #38 on: July 25, 2011, 06:41:39 AM »

On page 3 of the photo gallery .On that page there is "the bachmann builds a layout " and is built out of styrofoam  . Good step by step pictures after seeing this I wish I would have went that route . Just looked alot easier and user friendly . Over my few years coming to this forum I've seen it talked about alot but not this indepth . When I lived back up north you could find 2" x4ftx8ft sheets of styrofoam they used on basement walls but here in the south 1/2" thick 4x8 at you local building supply . Or go to your craft store and select sizes but nothing that big ....
« Last Edit: July 25, 2011, 06:43:44 AM by mf5117 » Logged
Jerrys HO
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« Reply #39 on: July 25, 2011, 07:09:11 AM »

mf5117
I live in the south also and had a hard time finding 2". I finally found it thru a local a/c supply house that a friend told me about. The only thing home depot and local hardware stores carry is 1/2".
Jerry
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #40 on: July 25, 2011, 10:18:20 AM »

Here in northeastern Alabama, I have had no problem finding 1" Styrofoam in our local Lowe's store. Unfortunately the 2" variety is not shipped to our area - unless it is a special order...and in quantity. Using the proper adhesive, one can easily glue two, 1-inch pieces together.

Another stable underlayment, for a train layout, is Johns-Mansville black board (similar to homosote and used as sheathing under siding). To use this product, turn it such that the labeled, black side is down. The only problem I have found is that it will 'shed' its edges unless protected by some sort of fascia. BTW: This product is also easily available from Lowe's.

Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #41 on: July 25, 2011, 11:45:02 PM »

I knew there had to be an advantage to living in the frozen north and you gentlemen have just pointed one out.  Up here, every lumber yard and home improvement store has 2" Styrofoam, both the extruded and the bead board.  The ones specializing in insulation can usually supply 3" and 4" as well.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #42 on: July 26, 2011, 01:46:38 AM »

I think I'll stick to the lovely weather in Southern California, and deal with the problem finding foam insulation Cool

I drive by LAX (Los Angeles International Airport) where a new terminal is under construction they must have about 1/2 a million Sq. ft. of 2" thick blue insulation stacked in a staging area.  I'm waiting to see someone there so I can ask for scraps

NM-Jeff
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