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Author Topic: Forney rail sizes  (Read 3911 times)
oldline1

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« on: July 08, 2007, 05:02:10 AM »

I'm thinking of doing some On30 modeling using the Forney with outside frame. Will it run on code 55 or 70 rail?

Thanks,
Roger
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Charlie Mutschler

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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2007, 09:24:24 AM »

Roger, I have used code 70 rail in On3, and it looks good.  I think it comes out close to the height of 30 to 35 pound rail, which is typical of that used on a lot of early narrow gauge lines.     I think code 55 would be very light - possibly scaling out to a height appropriate for 18 - 20 pound rail.  That is a weight of rail used on light mine tramways, but is probably too light for most steam worked lines.  Though Bachmann's model of the tiny Porter 0-4-0T would be quite at home on such light rail.  If it was my layout, I would use code 70 rail for my track for use with the Forney.  In any case, use what you think is appropriate, because it is your railroad.  Happy modeling. 
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Woody Elmore

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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2007, 10:20:15 AM »

I have seen On3 modules that have code 55 rail for sidings. The track was soldered to pc board ties. The engineer gets "slow" orders for any move on that siding!
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NelsOn-30

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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2007, 12:01:00 PM »

Roger,

I have found that since I moved to O scale working in prototype linear dimensions ensures accuracy.

A helpful conversion is that 1 inch is equivalent to 0.020 (20 thousandths) in O scale.

O Scale : 1foot = ¼ Inch or 12inches = 0.25 inches or 1inch = .25 / 12 = 0.0208333…inches.

Code 55 rail = 0.55” high or 55 / 20 = 2 ¾” (scale)

Code 70 rail = 0.70” high or 70 / 20 = 3 1/2” (scale)

Code 83 rail = 0.83” high or .83 / 20 = 4 1/8” (scale)

Code 100 rail = 5” scale (You can do the math in your head)

For example: Grab irons, 0.015 brass wire is ¾” in O scale.

Converting prototype rail sizes in pounds per yard requires a conversion table I don’t have.


I hope this helps.

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Nelson

Notka Lake Logging & Navigation RR
terry2foot

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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2007, 01:16:38 PM »

I don't know whether the Bachmann Forney will work on code 55 rail, but I do know that code 55 rail is very difficult to work with compared to codes 70 or 83.

Also the "prototype" engine that is the closest to the Bachmann Forney had a higher weight on the drivers (30000 pounds total) than was permitted by the prototype rail which equates to code 55;-

Model          Prototype
Code       Weight/yard       Axle load (tons)

40       12          2
55       25          5½
70       35          9
83       55          16½
100       85          36   
 
But's it your choice,

Terry2foot
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oldline1

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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2007, 01:46:19 AM »

Everyone,

Thanks for the great answers to my rail question. I guess going to O will take some adjustment to my thinking. I've used code 55 with HOn3 and even HO std gauge with no problems.

Thanks again for the quick and informative answers!
Roger
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tac

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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2007, 04:29:04 AM »

Roger,

I have found that since I moved to O scale working in prototype linear dimensions ensures accuracy.

A helpful conversion is that 1 inch is equivalent to 0.020 (20 thousandths) in O scale.

O Scale : 1foot = ¼ Inch or 12inches = 0.25 inches or 1inch = .25 / 12 = 0.0208333…inches.

Code 55 rail = 0.55” high or 55 / 20 = 2 ¾” (scale)

Code 70 rail = 0.70” high or 70 / 20 = 3 1/2” (scale)

Code 83 rail = 0.83” high or .83 / 20 = 4 1/8” (scale)

Code 100 rail = 5” scale (You can do the math in your head)

For example: Grab irons, 0.015 brass wire is ¾” in O scale.

Converting prototype rail sizes in pounds per yard requires a conversion table I don’t have.

I hope this helps.

That is one VERY useful post.  Thanks, Nelson.

tac
www.ovgrs.org
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hminky
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2007, 07:40:01 AM »

Try these sites:

http://www.urbaneagle.com/data/RRrailsizes.html

http://www.s-scale.org.uk/rails.htm
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ebtnut

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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2007, 03:51:37 PM »

Roger:  Just a reminder--On30 uses HO scale wheel and track standards.  If you have used code 55 or code 70 successfully in HO, don't change a thing (except tie size).  As noted, consider using at least code 70 for light /old time narrow guage track in O narrow gauge.  I follow EBT practices in general, using code 100 rail for the main line, and code 83 for the sidings and yards.  Code 100 is about 85-90 lb. rail; code 83 is about 65 lb.
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japasha

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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2007, 12:50:27 PM »

Thanks to Terry 2foot and EBTnut on the sizes. I use code 83 myself for that oldtime rinky-dink look on my modules. For the layout, code 100 and PECO work very well. 

For those running K-series locomotives, the Rio Grande had to upgrade (as did the EBT) their mainline rail because the Mikados had a much higher axle loading than before.  The Baldwin/Crested Butte  Branch of the D&RGW has 55 pound rail and could only use small C-16s on that branch. Also note that bridges were a limiting factor as well as axle loading on rail.

Towards the end of the Rio Grande narrow gauge, the smaller K-27s were used for switching. On lightly laid sidings they used freight cars to reach so they didn't have to put the locomotive on the spur.
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terry2foot

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« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 04:12:12 AM »

this old thread has useful information regarding rail heights (codes) that may be relevant to the discussion on "what track?"


Terry
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2012, 07:32:27 PM »

I just did a Little test with My forney and a couple peices of code 55 track and the flanges are hitting the spikes.


NM-Jeff
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