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Author Topic: weathering  (Read 3929 times)
ForThemPanzerz

ForumField


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« on: October 13, 2011, 10:09:51 PM »

i just weathered useing the John Olsen pastel way and i was just wodering how i get the rust streaks and other details to really show.
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Forumfield
Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 12:50:48 AM »

I suppose you could add more of the colour but keep in mind that the best weathering is subtle unless you are trying to model a junkyard derelict.  Graffiti, on the other hand, can be as garish as you want and your imaginary train yard vandals can afford.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
Doneldon

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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 02:51:40 PM »

shay-

Subtle is the word. However, you can sometimes accentuate an object, weathered or not, by dry brushing some white on exposed upward and outward facing edges. You can also dry brush black on undersides. These techniques will give more depth to your models' surfaces. You can also dry brush light colored rust on exposed edges to add depth and a bit of age.

These things take a little practice to get right but weathering is not beyond the ability of anyone. I suggest experimenting on inexpensive models and less visible layout areas to perfect your technique. Don't be discouraged if your early efforts leave a little to be desired.
                                                                                                                                                                              -- D
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 11:13:43 PM »

To get rust streaks I break a small piece of pastel off and then soak it in 90% rubbing alcohol, I then dip my brush in clean 90% alcohol and then dab the tip on the piece of wet pastel, then I paint the streak on, it will seem dark, the next step is to use a clean brush and dab clean alcohol above the spot you just painted and let gravity do it's job, the new rust will start to come "alive" dry it by gently blowing on it or set it aside the 90% dries fast, if it's to dark then repeat as necessary until you like it.

This truck was done this way using different color pastel chalks only.

NM-Jeff
Just my two cents.

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Doneldon

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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 11:19:08 PM »

Narrow-

I like your flatish tires.

                 -- D
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ForThemPanzerz

ForumField


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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2011, 12:56:31 AM »

i finally have the faded paint and cinders Down on the roof and side parts... is rubbing alcohol the same as cleaning alcohol?
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Forumfield
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2011, 01:01:51 AM »

Thanks Donaldon,

I'd post how to do it but I don't want any youngsters to try it. I'm sure you know how it's done.



NM-Jeff
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2011, 01:08:59 AM »

I would think so, I call it rubbing alcohol because that's what my mom called it, it's Isoprofyl Alcohol. you can use 70% 90% or what ever you may have around the house I find the results are the same.

It will take a little practice try it on some old plastic items, I weather all kinds of oddball things for fun and practice.

NM-Jeff
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WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


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« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2011, 09:54:27 AM »

I like to use alcohol as well when I'm doing washes.....but, there are a couple of things to remember.

Number one......Make sure you're in a well ventilated area.....inhaling alcohol fumes is not a nice buzz.

Number 2......Alcohol washes can turn some paints a chalky white.....I have seen this mostly with acrylics.

Windex makes a good substitute for alcohol in these instances.

Sid
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Ken G Price


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« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2011, 02:05:04 PM »

Jeff, thanks for the tip.
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Ken G Price N-Scale out west. 1995-1996 or so! UP, SP, MoPac.
Pictures Of My Layout, http://s567.photobucket.com/albums/ss115/kengprice/
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2011, 02:06:38 PM »

Hi Woundedbear,
I have had some chalky white show up on some paints as well but it usually disappears when I set the weathering with a coat of dulkote.

NM-Jeff
« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 02:10:03 PM by NarrowMinded » Logged
Doneldon

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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2011, 11:32:34 PM »

Bear-

You're right; a rubbing alcohol high isn't a good thing. It's dangerous. That's why we, those of
us who do, drink ethyl alcohol. Isopropyl alcohol and, especially methyl alcohol, do serious
neurological damage and even death.
                                                           -- D
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rogertra


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« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2011, 01:16:31 AM »

I would think so, I call it rubbing alcohol because that's what my mom called it, it's Isoprofyl Alcohol. you can use 70% 90% or what ever you may have around the house I find the results are the same.

It will take a little practice try it on some old plastic items, I weather all kinds of oddball things for fun and practice.

NM-Jeff

NEVER use "rubbing alcohol" it contains oils added to make it "rubbing alcohol."  The oils will spoil your finish.

Use ONLY  Isopropyl Alcohol as it contain no oils.  70, 80, 90 or 99% Isopropyl Alcohol only has water added.  70% is 30% water, 80% is 20% water 90% is 10% and 99% is 1% water.   (0% and 99% will strip paint if your model is immersed in the Isopropyl Alcohol, so be warned.  The higher percentages, 90% and 99%, make good paint strippers for plastic models as they will not attack the plastic, only the paint.
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2011, 01:34:26 AM »

Quote
NEVER use "rubbing alcohol" it contains oils added to make it "rubbing alcohol."  The oils will spoil your finish.

I geuss I have never used "rubbing" alcohol. only Isopropyl.

I have never had paint any paint react to alcohol. I geuss I'm just lucky.

NM-Jeff
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DWU

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« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2011, 12:06:57 PM »

To Narrowminded,Being a custom builder Ive done hundreds of models,Ive never had any trouble with finishes,nor have the fumes overtaken me.I do however always laugh at how much time we spend building and painting a model to look perfect,then in a few minutes we screw the whole thing up with weathering!!!!!!!!!!By the way I have been overtaken more than once by that other alchol !
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