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Author Topic: Video: A real 0-4-0 in action  (Read 2681 times)
Ray Dunakin


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« on: October 22, 2011, 03:13:58 PM »

Last Sunday our club had its annual picnic at Old Poway Park in Poway, CA. At the park they have a beautiful, 1907 Baldwin 0-4-0 steam locomotive that runs on a 42" gauge track around the park. I spent much of my time there shooting video of this train and got a lot of interesting and unusual shots, which I've edited into a nifty video for YouTube:
 
http://youtu.be/E_SE7M9ThrI
 

This locomotive was originally an industrial saddle-tank engine. It was later bought by a private individual who "backdated" it and converted it to use a tender.

Enjoy!
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Visit www.raydunakin.com for photos, step-by-step articles and other information about the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
Hamish K

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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2011, 06:14:14 PM »

Ray

Nice video. However I don't really approve when people alter genuine locomotives to something they never were during their service lives. Didn't stop me enjoying the video though!

Hamish
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J3a-614

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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2011, 07:35:52 PM »

Hamish, I also post on a historic railroad site, Railway Preservation News.  Recently there was a discussion on something similar you might be interested in:

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=32198
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Ray Dunakin


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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2011, 08:42:44 PM »

I tend to agree. I'd rather see a locomotive preserved in its original form, or at least the form it was in at some point during its "working" life. At least this one isn't in garish colors with a faux diamond stack like you often find in an amusement park. It actually looks like something that might have been, rather than some kind of hideous cartoon.

BTW, the fine folks at Poway Midland RR were not responsible for "back-dating" this loco. That was done way back in 1960 and it went through a couple different owners since then.





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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2011, 01:58:17 PM »

BTW, the fine folks at Poway Midland RR were not responsible for "back-dating" this loco. That was done way back in 1960 and it went through a couple different owners since then.

Cute little dickens, though. I want one for my backyard.  Grin

Seriously, nice video! I enjoyed watching it.  Smiley
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Doneldon

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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2011, 01:23:16 AM »

florey-

It wasn't just the second hand lokies which got shopped and
changed. All of the railroads did it, starting about as soon as
the engine hit the tracks.
                                        -- D
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J3a-614

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« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2011, 07:51:32 PM »

Looks like 737/216 is in good hands, and looks good, too:

http://www.trainweb.org/chris/11win2.html

How she looked for a while:

http://www.vistadome.com/trains/steamtown/up737.html
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Doneldon

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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2011, 06:30:49 AM »

florey-

Aha! They are bands, not flutes according to Wikipedia: "steam and sand domes that appeared comparatively square in profile and lacked the common, ornate, cast-iron dome "rings," a decorative molding that dressed up the appearance of such domes and that many 19th century locomotives sported."

Either way, J3a's pic of the masquerading 737 is really, really bad. How could someone do that to such a nice little steam loco? I guess it's no surprise, though. One of J3a's photos reveals that they weren't even able to make the shelter long enough to cover the last ten feet of the Santa Fe caboose. How could such dolts possibly manage to make something look credibly like one of the Golden Spike locos?
                                                                                                                                                                  -- D
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