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Author Topic: Overweathered  (Read 5386 times)
GoCanes

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« on: January 26, 2012, 06:10:52 PM »

Weathered up some N scale 40' box cars.  They looked good last night.  Today, they are looking ugly.   Sad

Caught the local CSX today at the intersection, hoping to see some confirmation.  A mile of brand new hoppers heading to the Phosphate mines, with nigh a scratch or rust stain on 'em.


Man, I overdid it.   Cry
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2012, 09:12:11 PM »

Take a paintbrush and some 90% alcohol, brush them and brush some of the weathering away let it dry and then take another look.

When I over do it this is how I undo it sometimes they even look better,

If they end up with a white film wipe it off with a q-tip or just give them A light coat of dulkote I use testers.

NM-JEff
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GoCanes

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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2012, 09:15:36 PM »

Take a paintbrush and some 90% alcohol, brush them and brush some of the weathering away let it dry and then take another look.

When I over do it this is how I undo it sometimes they even look better,

If they end up with a white film wipe it off with a q-tip or just give them A light coat of dulkote I use testers.

NM-JEff



Thanks.   My past experioence building Soviet WWII tank models causes me to over do weathering, I think?
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Doneldon

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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2012, 11:54:48 PM »

Cane Man-

If you look at modern prototype rolling stock you'll find that,
in many cases, it's every bit as weathered as any WWII Soviet
tank.
            -- D
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2012, 10:34:00 AM »

The greatest error, made in weathering, is too much. I have found the best course of action is to apply a little weathering, let it stand overnight, and see what it looks like the next day. Usually, I only have to 'touch up' with a very light coat...which is far easier than trying to remove a heavy coat (this is especially true with weathering powders on wood).

Ray
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"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2012, 11:39:22 PM »

I think the single biggest mistake I see when people "Over Weather" is they the forget to Fade the paint, many times I see a nice job of applying the weathering accents, but it is on top of bright paint.

Bright fresh looking paint will be on a fairly clean car/loco.

Tons of rust and grime will be on a faded oxidized car/loco.

NM-Jeff



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GN.2-6-8-0


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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2012, 09:45:02 PM »

If you are speaking of just knocking down the factory's shiny paint  start with a coat of Testors Dullcote...
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Rocky Lives
NarrowMinded


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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 01:46:09 AM »

There's an Easy way that takes time and a little harder way.

I use the dullkote rattle can for a lightly weathered car, if it's going to be heavily weathered I first spray it with dulkote, let it dry then get my alcohol and pastel chalks out, I pick a color that is close but lighter then the original color, next I dip the brush in 90% alcohol and then rub it on the pastel chalk to pick up some color, I give the entire car (except the bottom) a brush down with this, then I let it dry and then spray it with dulkote again.

Second way is to set the car in the sun for a few weeks rotating it everyday, in summer you will be surprised at how it fades when placed next to a car kept inside.

(I live in california it's summer all the time)

NM-JEff
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Doneldon

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« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2012, 04:00:03 AM »

My wife says that I'm a little overweathered.
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GoCanes

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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2012, 10:34:29 AM »

There's an Easy way that takes time and a little harder way.

I use the dullkote rattle can for a lightly weathered car, if it's going to be heavily weathered I first spray it with dulkote, let it dry then get my alcohol and pastel chalks out, I pick a color that is close but lighter then the original color, next I dip the brush in 90% alcohol and then rub it on the pastel chalk to pick up some color, I give the entire car (except the bottom) a brush down with this, then I let it dry and then spray it with dulkote again.

Second way is to set the car in the sun for a few weeks rotating it everyday, in summer you will be surprised at how it fades when placed next to a car kept inside.

(I live in california it's summer all the time)

NM-JEff


Nice system, thanks for the tips
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mhampton
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2012, 11:04:24 AM »

If I may divert you to another forum, there's an excellent tutorial on fading paint that may be found at http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthread.php?19187-Fading-paint-on-rollingstock.
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CNE Runner


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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2012, 11:05:30 AM »

NM - My experience with Dullcote, and alcohol, is that the alcohol turns the Dullcote white (in aviation restoration that is called 'blushing'). Perhaps I did something wrong on my one attempt to use an alcohol-based wash over a surface that had previously been sealed with Dullcote. I have found that boxcar red cars will 'weather' or fade nicely with just a couple of coats of plain isopropanol...allowed to dry on the surface.

Ray

PS: mhampton - That was an interesting link...I will have to try that in the future. Thanks.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2012, 11:07:51 AM by CNE Runner » Logged

"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
mhampton
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2012, 11:27:26 AM »

NM - My experience with Dullcote, and alcohol, is that the alcohol turns the Dullcote white (in aviation restoration that is called 'blushing'). Perhaps I did something wrong on my one attempt to use an alcohol-based wash over a surface that had previously been sealed with Dullcote. I have found that boxcar red cars will 'weather' or fade nicely with just a couple of coats of plain isopropanol...allowed to dry on the surface.

Ray

PS: mhampton - That was an interesting link...I will have to try that in the future. Thanks.

I believe that Dullcote contains talc which gives it the flat look.  The alcohol reacts with the talc which causes the blushing.

Always happy to provide links to other alternatives.  The myriad ways to solve a single problem fascinate me.
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2012, 02:27:27 PM »

[quote alcohol turns the Dullcote white ][/quote]

I have experienced this as well usually when I try the alcohol wash without allowing the dulkote to dry a few days, but this is not always a bad thing, with a light dusting coat of dulkote it usually disappears and sometimes i like the oxidized paint look and just leave it.

NM-Jeff
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GN.2-6-8-0


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« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2012, 11:46:49 AM »

Here's a crummy i did yesterday ,simply a light overspray of Pollyscale Dirt,trick is to not get carried away,some do and the next thing you know you can't even read the road name on them. merely need to clean up a couple of the windows and darken up the smoke stack for that sooty look and a touch of rust on the couplers and its good to go.





« Last Edit: January 30, 2012, 11:50:26 AM by GN.2-6-8-0 » Logged

Rocky Lives
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