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January 25, 2021, 07:39:53 PM
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Author Topic: 1:28 scale ry.  (Read 4540 times)
jboot111

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« on: April 07, 2012, 09:00:59 PM »

i am considering building a 1:28 scale railroad and wanted to know where i could get parts
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JerryB

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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2012, 09:53:41 PM »

You are biting off a very difficult and time consuming project.

For 1:28 scale you are going to have to build virtually everything, including track, engines, rolling stock, structures and other items such as vehicles and figures.

Just to get you started, you need to decide on the era and whether your railroad will be standard gauge or narrow gauge. If you are modeling U.S. standard gauge (4' 8"), the space between the model's railheads will be 2" (slightly rounded from 2.018".) If representing 3' narrow gauge (the most common NG in the U.S.), your model track gauge will be 1.28".

As I wrote this, I thought to ask why you would pick a totally non-standard scale, where there is virtually nothing available either in kit form or in ready to run? Not raining on your idea, just interested in the reasoning.

Now I am certain several folks will jump in and suggest using items that are 1:29, 1:32, 1:24, 1:22.5, or even LGB's famous gummi scale (translates to "rubber" scale), but you specifically asked about 1:28 scale.

Happy (scale model) RRing,

jerry
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Sequoia Pacific RR in 1:20 / 70.6mm
Boonville Light & Power Co. in 1:20 / 45mm
Navarro Engineering & Construction Co. in 1:20 / 32mm
NMRA Life Member #3370
Member: Bay Area Electric Railway Association
Member: Society for the Preservation of Carter Railroad Resources
jboot111

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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2012, 05:49:36 PM »

well i want a railroad that i can ride on and have fun on
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jboot111

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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2012, 05:50:23 PM »

don't u mean 2 feet instead of inches
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JerryB

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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2012, 06:36:08 PM »

don't u mean 2 feet instead of inches

No.

To calculate any dimension in a given scale, just divide the original (full size or prototype) dimension by the scale factor.

In the case you asked about and I responded to, divide standard gauge (56") by 28:

56.5"/28=2.017"

Your new post clarifies your question by stating you are looking for a train you can ride on. Those ride on trains are a lot bigger than 1:28 scale.

Here are a few links to ride on train suppliers and hobby groups:

http://www.realtrains.com/index.php

http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/

http://www.btcomm.com/trains/primer/kind_of_railroad/bigbigtr.htm

Lots of information on those websites. If you don't find enough there, just Google something like "ride on model trains" or 'model trains I can ride on" and you will find a lot more possibilities.

Bachmann Trains (our host here) do not make any ride on trains.

Hope this helps, and Happy RRing,

Jerry
« Last Edit: April 08, 2012, 06:39:40 PM by JerryB » Logged

Sequoia Pacific RR in 1:20 / 70.6mm
Boonville Light & Power Co. in 1:20 / 45mm
Navarro Engineering & Construction Co. in 1:20 / 32mm
NMRA Life Member #3370
Member: Bay Area Electric Railway Association
Member: Society for the Preservation of Carter Railroad Resources
mhampton
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2012, 07:15:04 PM »

Try http://www.greatamericantrain.com/ for starters.  They make trains that are 7.5" gauge (the distance between the rails).  Their 4-6-0 steam profile locomotive (actually powered by electric motors) goes for just a tick under $15,000.
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ChrisS

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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2012, 12:02:00 AM »

7 1/4" is common on the east coast, 7 1/2" everywhere else
Going to be 1:8 scale for standard gauge and 1:6 for narrow.
I love mine. But track is outrageous. I think it's worse than the rolling stock
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2012, 01:02:15 AM »

I am still wondering where the O.P. got 1:28 scale from.  It occurs to me that 2.8" scale could be confused with 28:1.  My calculations indicate 2.8" scale could be real world standard gauge on 13" gauge track, although I cannot think of a reason why someone modelling this size on this continent wouldn't go the extra bit and use estate gauge at 14".  On the other hand, if the original poster is in the U.K., he might have a problem using estate gauge because it was and probably still is considered a working gauge, meaning it is subject to all kinds on regulations and possibly taxes.

The other possibility might be a 2.8" scale model of 36" real world gauge running on 8-1/4" gauge track.  While not one of the usual choices, 8-1/4" gauge is one that is used occasionally, including here in Saskatoon.

Jim   
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2012, 01:42:23 AM »

You can Find 7-1/4" and 7-1/2" Parts on ebay

I hope you have a lot of cash, or are good at scratch building.

I have seen people use 3/8"X1" flat bar welded to steel ties or set into grooves cut into wood ties as track.

I've been waiting for my niece to get a new wheel chair, she said I could have her old one, I am thinking of using it for the drive in a ride on battery powered 0-4-0 Davenport to run on 7-1/2"

NM-Jeff
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ChrisS

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« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2012, 01:11:43 PM »

jeff, thats what powers my drgw #50... three  1 1/2 hp 24v electric motors... 200a controller and four 6 volt golf cart batteries....  used to make it around train mountain no problem on one charge, with the new track additions, i may need to make a battery car...
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Jim Banner

Enjoying electric model railroading since 1950.


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« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2012, 11:55:53 PM »

I have seen rail similar to what NM-Jeff posted about but the 3/8 x 1 bar was welded to metal plates which were screwed to ties.  The ties were pressure treated wood but the owners were also trying out reclaimed plastic, similar to what is used for building decks.  This was at a club where they ran live steam, battery powered diesels, and a gasoline/electric hybrid to pull many carloads of tourists on summer weekends.  They felt the long service life even with their heavy usage made this type of track practical and revenue from their tourist operation made it affordable.

For lighter use, I have also seen track made with 3/8 x 1 (or perhaps is was 1/2 x 1) channel iron with the open side to the outside of the track.  It was drilled and screwed to the ties, two screws per tie for each rail.  The secret, they told me, was to drill the holes close to the junction of the web and the lower flange, which automatically put them at an angle, and to angle the screws.  This kept the rails from spreading under load.  I believe this would merit further investigation as 3/8 x 1 channel is about half the weight (and about half the price) of  3/8 x 1 flat bar.  It also does not require welding, and can be curved more easily than flat bar.  It struck me at the time that this would be a good choice for a home ride-on railway.

The club using the 3/8 x 1 flat bar track made their turnouts and crossings of the same material.  Their biggest problem apparently was tapering the points of the turnouts, even though they used relatively short point rails.  I suspect they could have made quite serviceable single point switches with that heavy a rail although club members might object to running on "street car track."  With channel rails, tapering the points would be somewhat easier, assuming tapered channel iron could take the weight, but stub switches might be a better choice for the backyard builder.

Jim
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Growing older is mandatory but growing up is optional.
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