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Author Topic: Re-lettering a locomotive and tender  (Read 10024 times)
napa15

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« on: April 25, 2012, 05:17:42 PM »

I am going to re-letter and re-painta Bachmann 2-8-0 Connie loco and tender, to a preferred specific favorite engine. I know how to remove the current lettering. What I don't know is what are the proper decals to purchase, or what brand/where to purchase them? This is my first time doing this and the ones I have found at my local hobby store are not the exact right size. The letters for the cab are too big, and the letters they have for the tender are too small. Also, the gold letters are too gold.. and not yellow enough to match the pictures below. BTW - the images below are of the engine I will be re-lettering the loco to.

Thanks for any tips you guys can give.
Chuck




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M1FredQ

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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2012, 09:53:23 PM »

Where do you find good decals??
I would love to have Pere Marquette to some of my Locomotives!
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mhampton
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2012, 10:01:53 PM »

Microscale offers alphabet and number decal sets in a plethora of colors and sizes.  That would be my first stop.
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J3a-614

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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2012, 11:14:59 PM »

I'm not familiar if they would look right for you, but if you can find them, look for a set of Southern Railway steam freight decals from Champ.  Unfortunately, the firm has been out of business for a couple of years now, and these may be hard to find. 

The decals made by this firm were considered something of a gold standard for quite a few years.  I regard it as too bad that this would be one thing that would go away; while modern model factory painting and printing is immeasurably improved over what it used to be only 10 years ago, there is still a lot for roads and sometimes certain cars that isn't offered.  And just what are you supposed to do for things like unlettered Tichy kits, or if you are planning a roster of cars for a model railroad set around Deepwater, W.Va., which would feature coal trains from the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Virginian Railway, and the New York Central (yes, the NYC ran there, it was a former Kanawha & Michigan line, all of these routes still in service)--and you're going to need a huge fleet of hopper cars, all with different numbers, for the three roads, not to mention some fleets of other cars, like a string of oil cars from the WW II era?  What if you're a Santa Fe or Southern Pacific modeler, and you've got to do the same thing with a bunch of refrigerator cars "loaded" with those California oranges?
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ryeguyisme

Heavy Mountain Steam


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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2012, 01:07:55 AM »

you might find this entertaining: http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/5805?page=1
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Johnson Bar Jeff

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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2012, 09:43:25 AM »

I'm not familiar if they would look right for you, but if you can find them, look for a set of Southern Railway steam freight decals from Champ.  Unfortunately, the firm has been out of business for a couple of years now, and these may be hard to find. 

The decals made by this firm were considered something of a gold standard for quite a few years.  I regard it as too bad that this would be one thing that would go away

I agree! I mourn our loss of Champ decals. For me they were always easy to work with, and the end result/appearance was always satisfactory.
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napa15

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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 11:34:13 AM »

I appreciate the suggestions and direction. i will do some more digging and see what I can come up with. Did a good bit of painting on the locomotive this weekend to add the white and red detailing. Pretty pleased with the the results, but have to trim the cab window areas red still and am VERY apprehensive about that. I have no idea how I'm going to pull that off without messing something up. Also have a lot of detail work to do, like replacing the bell and such, lots of finer details. Smiley

OH - almost forgot this question.. Most decals I am seeing in the hobby shops here where I live, in the train section, are "dry" decals. It looks like those are for buildings and maybe even freight cars. Am I correct in assuming that I am looking for "wet" decals for this type of application? Also, since I'm likely going to be ordering online, how will I know the difference and if I'm ordering the right product? Sorry for what I'm sure appear to be rookie questions.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2012, 04:49:04 AM »

napa-

There is no difference in the use of dry and wet decals. Either type can be used anywhere. It's all a matter of individual preference, availability and experience. Some folks like one, some the other. Most decal listings will state whether decals are true decals, stick-ons or dry transfers.

I, too, miss Champ. However, please note that they printed acres of decals before they ceased production so you can still obtain most of their catalogue items. Some hobby shops still carry them and they show up on ebay regularly. The trick with ebay, of course, is that you must find a listing for the decal set you need.

                                                                                                                                                     -- D
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ebtnut

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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2012, 12:53:36 PM »

I have to disagree some with dry vs. wet being "the same".  They may look the same when applied, but they are vastly different in application.  I frankly never had much luch with dry transfers on anything other than a smooth flat surface.  With wet decals, they can be slid off and moved around a bit to get them right where you need them before blotting and using setting solution.  As for the issue with the steamer lettering, I think what you want to look for in color is "Dulux Gold", not plain Gold.  Also, consider looking at decals for other scales - That small  Southern on the side of the cab might be found in an N scale set, for instance. 
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napa15

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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2012, 02:13:31 PM »

Once again, I greatly appreciate all the advice and leads you guys are giving. That's why I posted my question here, as I knew this is where I would likely get my most direct answers. (I could have posted in another RR Modeling forum I frequent too, but prefer here). I am on the prowl for what I need and will update this thread with pictures of the locomotive - when i get get to that point.  Grin
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Desertdweller

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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2012, 02:51:42 PM »

I read on another forum that Champ has been out-of-production for several years, but had a supply of decals that could be used to fill orders.  Until the bad flood in Minot, ND last year destroyed their stock.

Champ made an excellent product that was my favorite brand.

Never had much success with dry transfers.  They tend to fall apart when being applied, are difficult to put on straight, and come off when handled.  Maybe it is just me.  A lot of folks like them.

Les       
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rogertra


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« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2012, 03:34:01 PM »

I read on another forum that Champ has been out-of-production for several years, but had a supply of decals that could be used to fill orders.  Until the bad flood in Minot, ND last year destroyed their stock.

Champ made an excellent product that was my favorite brand.

Never had much success with dry transfers.  They tend to fall apart when being applied, are difficult to put on straight, and come off when handled.  Maybe it is just me.  A lot of folks like them.

Les       

I'll agree that dry transfers are harder to apply as there's no second chance like there is with decals.

However, if you don't spray your transfers or decals with a fixative, like Dullcote, then they will eventually come off when handled.  Always spray your decals and transfers with something like Dullcote.
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Doneldon

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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2012, 12:43:41 AM »

I have to disagree some with dry vs. wet being "the same".
ebt-

There are more meanings to use than gluing part A to part B. Think "yuze" versus "yoose." Thus, you can use (yuze) paint to color a wall or consult the internet to learn about the use (yoose) of a paint brush. My post doesn't say that the mechanics of applying wet and dry transfer decals are the same; it says that you can use either kind of decal anywhere you need a decal.
                                                                                                         -- D

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J3a-614

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« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2012, 07:28:29 AM »

Did some looking up of decal numbers to help you find what you may want.  All of these are Champion Decal numbers ("wet" or "water-slide" decals):

EH-32--Steam, freight, all dulux gold, with large numbers, road name, and SR herald--this is the set you would normally want for this job.

EH-232--Steam, passenger, bronze gold, "Crescent Limited," other lettering for green locomotives; for passenger power, you will also need the set below:

EH-232S--Steam, "Crescent Limited" bronze gold, stripes set, to go with the lettering set above.

EH-232D--Steam, passenger, dulux gold, "Crescent Limited," other lettering for green locomotives; for passenger power, you will also need the set below:

EH-232SD--Steam, "Crescent Limited" dulux gold, stripes set, to go with the lettering set above.

"Dulux gold" or "dulux yellow" is a common gold or yellow paint color, used by a lot of railroads for steam locomotives and passenger cars.  "Bronze gold" is as its name suggests, a darker, metallic-looking color, and simulates the gold leaf style paint used before such finishes got too expensive.

A site I think you will like:

http://southern.railfan.net/

Some selected links from above:

http://southern.railfan.net/images/archive/southern/steam_ex/steam_ex.html

This engine was once offered by Bachmann:

http://southern.railfan.net/images/archive/southern/steam/482/sou1452.html

Have fun.
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napa15

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« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2012, 10:49:05 AM »

Thanks a TON J3a-614, that's great stuff and a huge help.

I have visited that site before. I won't stray too far off topic here.. but since you provided the links to "Southern Steam", the #630 is a cool engine to me and I like it because it is a "Southern Steamer".

BUT.. what you hit on that you are unaware of is that the engine that has a VERY SPECIAL place with me is the Southern #4501 (which is also at the same Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum with the #630) that you see on that "Southern Steam" page you linked to. That engine to me is my childhood, my grandfather, and why I love trains today... and why I want to pass that love on to my son. And, the #4501, which is a Light Mikado 2-8-2, is currently well into restoration and due to be back in service later this year (fingers-crossed). I can say that I will be there when she is under steam again, with my son and daughter.

Anyway.. sorry to stray off topic.. BUT YOU STARTED IT.  Grin
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