ONLINE
STORE
"ASK THE BACH MAN"
FORUM
PARTS, SERVICE,
& INFORMATION
CATALOGS AND
BROCHURES

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 17, 2019, 07:05:50 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Check out the photo gallery link above or >click here< to see photos of recently announced products!
+  Bachmann Message Board
|-+  Discussion Boards
| |-+  General Discussion
| | |-+  floquil paint thinner
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: floquil paint thinner  (Read 3960 times)
jud8979

View Profile
« on: September 09, 2012, 07:43:11 PM »

i live nowhere near a hobby shop and you can't mail paint products in my state.....what commercial product will thin floquil paints....mineral spirits will clean up but the paint but the paint particulates out so it's not a thinner......
Logged
Doneldon

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2012, 03:06:35 AM »

jud-

I haven't had luck with anything but Floquil's own thinner. However, give lacquer thinner a try. It's about as close to a universal solvent as there is. Depending on the exact formulation of your laquer thinner, you might want to add some alcohol. But I'd go with straight lacquer thinner for openers. Good luck.
            -- D
Logged
CNE Runner


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 10:37:50 AM »

Jud - I believe Floquil #140001 Thinner & Solvent is methyl ethyl ketone (also known as butanone or MEK. [CH3C(O)CH2CH3] Methyl ethyl ketone has a CAS number of 78-93-3. Please, please notice that I preface my remarks with; "I believe..." Sadly there is no indication, on my can anyway, that indicates anything other than that it is a petroleum distallate.

I would check with Floquil about the actual chemical components of this thinner. Failing that I suppose one could check with ones local hazardous waste department (probably part of your local/county fire department) and get a copy of the MSDS sheet for the product.

IF Floquil thinner is methyl ethyl ketone it can be had from many aircraft supply houses (although shipping would be a problem). You might also check with your local airport's maintenance shop ('thinking general aviation here) as they usually have a supply of MEK on hand for fabric aircraft repairs...and may sell you a small amount - or give you a lead to their supplier.

Having recovered several aircraft over the years, I caution you to treat MEK with the utmost respect. MEK can cause all sorts of nasty problems in the body (#1 being lung damage). Also be careful on what surface you plan on using MEK. MEK is a solvent and a paint remover. That is why Floquil sells a 'barrier' product to protect styrene surfaces (car sides, etc.). [As an aside: Most of the popular styrene cements are MEK based.]

In summary: I am not saying definitely - nor do I know - that Floquil #140001 Thinner & Solvent is methyl ethyl ketone...merely that I believe it is. Floquil is required, by law, to disclose the chemical components of its products...even if they are a Canadian company.

I hope this helps,
Ray
Logged

"Keeping my hand on the throttle...and my eyes on the rail"
mabloodhound


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2012, 10:55:33 AM »

MEK and acetone are both available at Ace Hardware and the big box stores.
Logged

Dave Mason

D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
 “In matters of style, swim with the current;
 in matters of principle, stand like a rock.”   Thos. Jefferson

The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security
Woody Elmore

View Profile
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2012, 12:15:56 PM »

Use caution with Floquil paints and MEK. Mek can be used to assemble plastic kits as well as thin Floquil paints. I believe that Floquil uses Xylene as a thinner. I can't be sure as I haven't bought any lately.

Use a respirator if you spray Floquil or any other paint that is laquer or xylene based as it is not user friendly to internal organs. I believe that Scalecoat is also in the same category.



Logged
ebtnut

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2012, 01:01:28 PM »

Floquil's Dio-Sol is actually the solvent Xylene, not MEK.  Xylene is not quite as nasty as MEK, but should be handled like most any of these petroleum distillate solvents.  I believe one of Xylene's industrial uses is to aid in the setting of concrete in cold weather.  I bought a gallon of the stuff at a chemical supply house about 40 years ago, and still have about 90% of it!  These days, I very little use for it since most all the paints these days have gone to acrylics or other, safer solvent bases. 

Logged
Doneldon

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2012, 01:40:49 PM »

Well supplied hardware stores carry Xylene. I haven't purchased any but I have seen it.
Logged
WoundedBear
A Derailed Drag Racer


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2012, 06:13:06 PM »

Floquil....part of Testors....part of RPM. Click on link for a copy of the MSDS sheet for the airbrush thinner.

http://www.testors.com/media/document/MS.F110001.050911.pdf

Sid
Logged

bmjcook

View Profile
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2012, 06:40:32 PM »



Gidday
            To thin Floquil I have always used 3M car care General Purpose Thinner. Automotive and Industrial thinner. This also cleans the airbrush. I have been using this product for many years and have never had a problem with it. I do not know if you can buy it in the USA.
                                                                                                                 Cookie
Logged
Doneldon

View Profile
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2012, 07:02:11 PM »

WB-

Thank you for the reference on Dio-Sol. It looks like it is mostly Naptha and a Benzene compound with a little Xylene and Toluene. Those are all nasty substances so an exhausting paint booth is necessary for airbrushing. I don't worry too much when brushing Floquil but I wouldn't do that in a confined space, either.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      -- D
« Last Edit: September 12, 2012, 04:44:45 AM by Doneldon » Logged
jud8979

View Profile
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2012, 10:52:15 PM »

Thanks to everyone for the information...
Logged
M1FredQ

View Profile
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2012, 09:40:57 PM »

When I was model airplane building I would thin my paints with acrylic lacquer thinner!!

It is awesome stuff, it bits into plastic to make a permanent bond and on metal it has

a very realistic finish. I clean my airbrush with it and leaves NO residue.

Make sure you paint in a well vented area or outside. Never ever near any source of flames.

Once my paint jobs are done and have dried for a few days I lay a coat of Future floor wax, let it

dry lay down my decals and once dried seal with another coat of Future Floor Wax, then when

that is dry spray some dull coat
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!