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Author Topic: weathering  (Read 3524 times)
bill collins

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« on: February 24, 2013, 04:39:17 PM »

I'm going to weather some box car and a Plasticville barn using Doc O'Brians weathering chalk. Should I use dulcoat before or after using the chalk?
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Doneldon

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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2013, 05:03:46 PM »

bill-

After, to preserve and protect your weathering.

                                                              -- D
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WoundedBear
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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2013, 07:10:47 PM »

Use it before as well....that way the weathering powders have something to hold on to.

They will not stick to most bare plastics very well.

Sid
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NarrowMinded


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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2013, 01:10:26 AM »

I dullkote before and then after, practice on something first to get a feel for how much and or dark you need to weather, when you dulkote some of the weathering colors will almost disappear.


NM-Jeff
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bfelix

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« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2013, 12:52:03 PM »

I have been looking for chalk to weather my buildings as well. Where do you buy them? I have been looking all over ebay and cant seem to find any weathering powder. Maybe I am not searching for the right thing?
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bapguy

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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2013, 01:08:17 PM »

Micro Mark has them. Listed under paint and weathering.  Joe
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ebtnut

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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2013, 01:38:42 PM »

Another option is to use artist's pastels.  You can buy an assortment box at an artist's supply store or at one of the big-box craft stores.  They come in sticks, either square or round.  I use the edge of a modelling knife to scrape along the edge of the stick to create a powder and then apply with soft brushes.  As noted above. practice first to get a feel for how heavy to apply since the Dullcote will knock the colors back quite a bit. 
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ebtbob


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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2013, 03:23:36 PM »

Good Afternoon all,

     I use chalks from a company called Bragdon.   They have a bit of an adhesive mixed in so the final spray of dullcoat is really not necessary.   But,  if you are going to dulcoat after putting on the chalks,  make sure that you weather with a heavier coating because the force of the spray will dislodge some of the chalk.   The advice to practice on an old car body or building you do not care for is GREAT advice.
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Bob Rule, Jr.
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mabloodhound


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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2013, 04:01:11 PM »

I also like the Bragdon powders.   They stick very well unless you handle the item a lot.
I do NOT dullcoat afterwards.  The dullcoat will kill the effect of the powders.   Experiment first on a scrap piece before doing your item.
 Cool
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Dave Mason

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GG1onFordsDTandI
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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2013, 05:13:24 PM »

Another option is to use artist's pastels.  You can buy an assortment box at an artist's supply store or at one of the big-box craft stores.  They come in sticks, either square or round.  I use the edge of a modelling knife to scrape along the edge of the stick to create a powder and then apply with soft brushes.  As noted above. practice first to get a feel for how heavy to apply since the Dullcote will knock the colors back quite a bit. 
You mean the drier chalks, not crayon like oil pastels, right. I would assume the oils would fisheye and shed the wet dull coat leaving them bare, unprotected. Long before dull coats were common, I used hairsprays to keep stuff in place.
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Jerrys HO
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« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2013, 07:44:47 PM »

I'm another Bragdon chalk user. I dullcote on most but like Bob said it will blow the chalk. I usually hold the can far away and let the mist fall.

I found mine on E-bay real cheap and it has enough to last a long time.
Jerry
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ebtnut

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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2013, 01:01:41 PM »

GG1 - In answer to your question - Yes, the dry chalk type pastels, not the oil or crayon pastels. 
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